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Found 24 result(s)
The data in the U of M’s Clinical Data Repository comes from the electronic health records (EHRs) of more than 2 million patients seen at 8 hospitals and more than 40 clinics. For each patient, data is available regarding the patient's demographics (age, gender, language, etc.), medical history, problem list, allergies, immunizations, outpatient vitals, diagnoses, procedures, medications, lab tests, visit locations, providers, provider specialties, and more.
Country
The FDZ-DZA (Forschungsdatenzentrum DZA) is a facility of the German Centre of Gerontology (Deutsches Zentrum für Altersfragen, DZA) and has received accreditation as research data center DZA by the German Data Forum (RatSWD). Its main task is to make data of the German Ageing Survey DEAS and the German Survey on Volunteering (FWS) accessible to researchers by providing user-friendly Scientific Use Files (SUF), documentation of the contents and instruments as well support for scholars using the data.
OHSU Digital Commons is a repository for the scholarly and creative work of Oregon Health & Science University. Developed by the OHSU Library, Digital Commons provides the university community with a platform for publishing and accessing content produced by students, faculty, and staff. OHSU Digital Commons documents the history and growth of the university, as well as current progress in education, research, and health care.
NACDA acquires and preserves data relevant to gerontological research, processing as needed to promote effective research use, disseminates them to researchers, and facilitates their use. By preserving and making available the largest library of electronic data on aging in the United States, NACDA offers opportunities for secondary analysis on major issues of scientific and policy relevance
The Health and Retirement Study (HRS) is a longitudinal panel study that surveys a representative sample of more than 26,000 Americans over the age of 50 every two years. The study has collected information about income, work, assets, pension plans, health insurance, disability, physical health and functioning, cognitive functioning, genetic information and health care expenditures.
The Growing Up Today Study is a collaborative study between clinicians, researchers, and thousands of participants across the US and beyond. The aim of this study is to gain a deeper understanding of the factors that affect health throughout life. Together we are working to building one of the most powerful resources for fighting cancer, obesity, heart disease, depression, and so much more.
The CDHA assists researchers to create, document, and distribute public use microdata on health and aging for secondary analysis. Major research themes include: midlife development and aging; economics of population aging; inequalities in health and aging; international comparative studies of health and aging; and the investigation of linkages between social-demographic and biomedical research in population aging. The CDHA is one of fourteen demography centers on aging sponsored by the National Institute on Aging.
Country
Curtin University has 222 data records in Research Data Australia, which cover 199 subjects areas including Applied research, EARTH SCIENCES and GEOLOGY and involve 32 group(s)
CDC.gov is the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention primary online communication channel. CDC.gov provides users with credible, reliable health information on Data and Statistics, Diseases and Conditions, Emergencies and Disasters, Environmental Health, Healthy Living, Injury, Violence and Safety,Life Stages and Populations, Travelers' Health, Workplace Safety and Health
The Africa Centre offers longitudinal datasets from a rural demographic in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa where HIV prevalence is extremely high. The data may be filtered by demographics, years, or by individuals questionnaires. The Africa Centre requests notification that anyone contact them when downloading their data. Since January 2000, the Africa Centre For Population Health has built up an extensive longitudinal database of demographic, social, medical and economic information about the members of its Demographic Surveillance Area, which is situated in a rural area of northern KwaZulu-Natal. It has developed from this database, the following suite of datasets which can be used both internally within the organisation, and by other researchers.
MEASURE DHS is advancing global understanding of health and population trends in developing countries through nationally-representative household surveys that provide data for a wide range of monitoring and impact evaluation indicators in the areas of population, health, HIV, and nutrition. The database collects, analyzes, and disseminates data from more than 300 surveys in over 90 countries. MEASURE DHS distributes, at no cost, survey data files for legitimate academic research.
Country
More than a quarter of a million people — one in 10 NSW men and women aged over 45 — have been recruited to our 45 and Up Study, the largest ongoing study of healthy ageing in the Southern Hemisphere. The baseline information collected from all of our participants is available in the Study’s Data Book. This information, which researchers use as the basis for their analyses, contains information on key variables such as height, weight, smoking status, family history of disease and levels of physical activity. By following such a large group of people over the long term, we are developing a world-class research resource that can be used to boost our understanding of how Australians are ageing. This will answer important health and quality-of-life questions and help manage and prevent illness through improved knowledge of conditions such as cancer, heart disease, depression, obesity and diabetes.
The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Data Archive (SAMHDA) is an initiative funded under contract HHSS283201500001C with the Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality (CBHSQ), Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). CBHSQ has primary responsibility for the collection, analysis, and dissemination of SAMHSA's behavioral health data. Public use files and restricted use files are provided. CBHSQ promotes the access and use of the nation's substance abuse and mental health data through SAMHDA. SAMHDA provides public-use data files, file documentation, and access to restricted-use data files to support a better understanding of this critical area of public health.
diversitydata.org is an online tool for exploring quality of life data across metropolitan areas for people of different racial/ethnic groups in the United States. It provides values and rankings for the largest U.S. metropolitan areas on different indicators in 8 areas of life (domains), including demographics, education, economic opportunity, housing, neighborhoods, and health. It also provides a simple mapping utility, showing the range of indicator values for metros across the U.S. Data from 1999 indicators is archives in the companion Diversity Data Archive (http://diversitydata-archive.org). For a wider selection of data on child wellbeing, visit our partner site, diversitydatakids.org (http://www.diversitydatakids.org/).
International Research Institute for Climate and Society (IRI) research focuses on climate, environmental monitoring, agriculture, health, water, and economic sectors in Africa, Asia and Pacific, and Latin America and Caribbean. The IRI data library is a freely accessible data repository and analysis tool. IRI allows users to view, manipulate, and download climate-related data sets through a standard web browser.
The Mexican Health and Aging Study (MHAS) started as a prospective panel study of health and aging in Mexico. MHAS is nationally representative of the 13 million Mexicans born prior to 1951. The survey has national and urban/rural representation. The baseline survey, in 2001, included a nationally representative sample of Mexicans aged 50 and over and their spouse/partners regardless of their age. A direct interview was sought with each individual and proxy interviews were obtained when poor health or temporary absence precluded a direct interview. The sample was distributed in all 32 states of the country in urban and rural areas. Households in the six states which account for 40% of all migrants to the U.S. were over-sampled. A sub-sample was selected to obtain anthropometric measures.
The GHO data repository provides access to over 50 datasets on priority health topics including mortality and burden of diseases, the Millennium Development Goals (child nutrition, child health, maternal and reproductive health, immunization, HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria, neglected diseases, water and sanitation), non communicable diseases and risk factors, epidemic-prone diseases, health systems, environmental health, violence and injuries, equity among others. In addition, the GHO provides on-line access to WHO's annual summary of health-related data for its Member states: the World Health Statistics.
The Whitehall II study was established to explore the relationship between socio-economic status, stress and cardiovascular disease. A cohort of 10,308 participants aged 35-55, of whom 3,413 were women and 6,895 men, was recruited from the British Civil Service in 1985. Since this first wave of data collection, self-completion questionnaires and clinical data have been collected from the cohort every two to five years with a high level of participation. Data collection is intended to continue until 2030.
Knoema is a knowledge platform. The basic idea is to connect data with analytical and presentation tools. As a result, we end with one uniformed platform for users to access, present and share data-driven content. Within Knoema, we capture most aspects of a typical data use cycle: accessing data from multiple sources, bringing relevant indicators into a common space, visualizing figures, applying analytical functions, creating a set of dashboards, and presenting the outcome.