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Found 13 result(s)
The data in the U of M’s Clinical Data Repository comes from the electronic health records (EHRs) of more than 2 million patients seen at 8 hospitals and more than 40 clinics. For each patient, data is available regarding the patient's demographics (age, gender, language, etc.), medical history, problem list, allergies, immunizations, outpatient vitals, diagnoses, procedures, medications, lab tests, visit locations, providers, provider specialties, and more.
The FREEBIRD website aims to facilitate data sharing in the area of injury and emergency research in a timely and responsible manner. It has been launched by providing open access to anonymised data on over 30,000 injured patients (the CRASH-1 and CRASH-2 trials).
Project Tycho® is a project at the University of Pittsburgh to advance the availability and use of public health data for science and policy making. Currently, the Project Tycho® database includes data from all weekly notifiable disease reports for the United States dating back to 1888. These data are freely available to anybody interested. Additional U.S. and international data will be released twice yearly.
The Growing Up Today Study is a collaborative study between clinicians, researchers, and thousands of participants across the US and beyond. The aim of this study is to gain a deeper understanding of the factors that affect health throughout life. Together we are working to building one of the most powerful resources for fighting cancer, obesity, heart disease, depression, and so much more.
The ROAR Isolate Database is a searchable collection of commensal and complimentary pathogen isolate datasets. ROAR allows investigators to identify datasets of interest, submit datasets, or download datasets. ROAR datasets include data depositors' contact information and links to their articles in ROAR Literature Database.
Born in Bradford is one of the biggest and most important medical research studies undertaken in the UK. The project started in 2007 and is looking to answer questions about our health by tracking the lives of 13,500 babies and their families and will provide information for studies across the UK and around the world. The aim of Born in Bradford is to find out more about the causes of childhood illness by studying children from all cultures and backgrounds as their lives unfold.
The Twenty-07 Study was set up in 1986 in order to investigate the reasons for differences in health by socio-economic circumstances, gender, area of residence, age, ethnic group, and family type. 4510 people are being followed for 20 years. The initial wave of data collection took place in 1987/8, when respondents were aged 15, 35 and 55. The final wave of data collection took place in 2007/08 when respondents were aged 35, 55 and 75. In this way the Twenty-07 Study provides us with unique opportunities to investigate both the changes in people's lives over 20 years and how they affect their health, and the differences in people's experiences at the same ages 20 years apart, and how these have different effects on their health.
The Africa Centre offers longitudinal datasets from a rural demographic in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa where HIV prevalence is extremely high. The data may be filtered by demographics, years, or by individuals questionnaires. The Africa Centre requests notification that anyone contact them when downloading their data. Since January 2000, the Africa Centre For Population Health has built up an extensive longitudinal database of demographic, social, medical and economic information about the members of its Demographic Surveillance Area, which is situated in a rural area of northern KwaZulu-Natal. It has developed from this database, the following suite of datasets which can be used both internally within the organisation, and by other researchers.
The Swiss HIV Cohort Study (SHCS), established in 1988, is a systematic longitudinal study enrolling HIV-infected individuals in Switzerland. It is a collaboration of all Swiss University Hospital infectious disease outpatient clinics, two large cantonal hospitals, all with affiliated laboratories, and with affiliated smaller hospitals and private physicians carrying for HIV patients. The Swiss Mother and Child HIV Cohort Study (MoCHiV) is integrated into the SHCS. It aims at preventing mother to child transmission and enrolls HIV-infected pregnant women and their children. The SHCS involves practically all researchers being active in patient-oriented HIV research in Switzerland. The clinics can delegate recruitment of participants and follow-up visits to other outpatient clinics or to specialized private physicians, provided that the requirements of the protocol can be entirely fulfilled and controlled. The laboratories can contract other laboratories for some of the analyses.
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The Population Health Research Data Repository housed at MCHP is a comprehensive collection of administrative, registry, survey, and other data primarily relating to residents of Manitoba. It was developed to describe and explain patterns of health care and profiles of health and illness, facilitating inter-sectoral research in areas such as health care, education, and social services.