Filter
Reset all

Subjects

Content Types

Countries

AID systems

API

Data access

Data access restrictions

Database access

Database access restrictions

Database licenses

Data licenses

Data upload

Data upload restrictions

Enhanced publication

Institution responsibility type

Institution type

Keywords

Metadata standards

PID systems

Provider types

Quality management

Repository languages

Software

Syndications

Repository types

Versioning

  • * at the end of a keyword allows wildcard searches
  • " quotes can be used for searching phrases
  • + represents an AND search (default)
  • | represents an OR search
  • - represents a NOT operation
  • ( and ) implies priority
  • ~N after a word specifies the desired edit distance (fuzziness)
  • ~N after a phrase specifies the desired slop amount
  • 1 (current)
Found 18 result(s)
The Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative Information and Data Cooperative (GRIIDC) is a team of researchers, data specialists and computer system developers who are supporting the development of a data management system to store scientific data generated by Gulf of Mexico researchers. The Master Research Agreement between BP and the Gulf of Mexico Alliance that established the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (GoMRI) included provisions that all data collected or generated through the agreement must be made available to the public. The Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative Information and Data Cooperative (GRIIDC) is the vehicle through which GoMRI is fulfilling this requirement. The mission of GRIIDC is to ensure a data and information legacy that promotes continual scientific discovery and public awareness of the Gulf of Mexico Ecosystem.
The NCAA Student-Athlete Experiences Data Archive provides access to data about student athletes and will grow to include a handful of user-friendly data collections related to graduation rates; team-level Academic Progress Rates in Division I; and individual-level data on the experiences of current and former student-athletes from the NCAA's Growth, Opportunities, Aspirations and Learning of Students in college study (GOALS), and the Study of College Outcomes and Recent Experiences (SCORE). In the long run, the NCAA expects to follow this initial release with the publication of as much data as possible from its archives. The data is used by college presidents, athletic personnel, faculty, student-athlete groups, media members, and researchers in looking at issues related to intercollegiate athletics and higher education.
This interface provides access to several types of data related to the Chesapeake Bay. Bay Program databases can be queried based upon user-defined inputs such as geographic region and date range. Each query results in a downloadable, tab- or comma-delimited text file that can be imported to any program (e.g., SAS, Excel, Access) for further analysis. Comments regarding the interface are encouraged. Questions in reference to the data should be addressed to the contact provided on subsequent pages.
CPES provides access to information that relates to mental disorders among the general population. Its primary goal is to collect data about the prevalence of mental disorders and their treatments in adult populations in the United States. It also allows for research related to cultural and ethnic influences on mental health. CPES combines the data collected in three different nationally representative surveys (National Comorbidity Survey Replication, National Survey of American Life, National Latino and Asian American Study).
A premier source for United States cancer statistics, SEER gathers information related to incidence, prevalence, and survival from specific geographic areas that represent 28 percent of the population, as well as compiles related reports and reports on the national cancer mortality rates. Their aim is to provide information related to cancer statistics and decrease the burden of cancer in the national population. SEER has been collecting data from cancer cases since 1973.
PhysioNet is an on-line forum for the dissemination and exchange of recorded biomedical signals and open-source software for analyzing them. It provides facilities for the cooperative analysis of data and the evaluation of proposed new algorithms. In addition to providing free electronic access to PhysioBank data and PhysioToolkit software via the World Wide Web. PhysioNet offers services and training via on-line tutorials to assist users with varying levels of expertise. PhysioNet is a resource for biomedical research and development. It has three closely interdependent components: PhysioBank is a large and growing archive of well-characterized digital recordings of physiologic signals, time series, and related data for use by the biomedical research community. PhysioBank currently includes more than 60 collections of cardiopulmonary, neural, and other biomedical signals from healthy subjects and patients with a variety of conditions with major public health implications, including sudden cardiac death, congestive heart failure, epilepsy, gait disorders, sleep apnea, and aging. PhysioToolkit is a large and growing library of software for physiologic signal processing and analysis, detection of physiologically significant events using both classical techniques and novel methods based on statistical physics and nonlinear dynamics, interactive display and characterization of signals, creation of new databases, simulation of physiologic and other signals, quantitative evaluation and comparison of analysis methods, and analysis of nonequilibrium and nonstationary processes. PhysioNetWorks is a virtual laboratory where you can work together with us and with colleagues anywhere in the world to create, evaluate, improve, document, and prepare new data and software "works" for publication on PhysioNet. Unlike all other parts of the PhysioNet web site, access to PhysioNetWorks is password-protected. (Accounts are free and a password can be obtained in a minute or two.)
The Evidence-based Practice Center (EPC) at Tufts Medical Center, with support from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), has developed the Systematic Review Data Repository (SRDR), which is a Web-based tool for data extraction and storage of systematic review data. Potential users include patients, policy makers/stakeholders, independent researchers, research centers, and funders of research.
The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) is the world's largest, on-going telephone health survey system. As a result, surveys were developed and conducted to monitor state-level prevalence of the major behavioral risks among adults associated with premature morbidity and mortality. The basic philosophy was to collect data on actual behaviors, rather than on attitudes or knowledge, that would be especially useful for planning, initiating, supporting, and evaluating health promotion and disease prevention programs. Currently data are collected monthly in all 50 states.
The CPTAC Data Portal is the centralized repository for the dissemination of proteomic data collected by the Proteome Characterization Centers (PCCs) for the CPTAC program. The portal also hosts analyses of the mass spectrometry data (mapping of spectra to peptide sequences and protein identification) from the PCCs and from a CPTAC-sponsored common data analysis pipeline (CDAP).
The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Data Archive (SAMHDA) is an initiative funded under contract HHSS283201500001C with the Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality (CBHSQ), Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). CBHSQ has primary responsibility for the collection, analysis, and dissemination of SAMHSA's behavioral health data. Public use files and restricted use files are provided. CBHSQ promotes the access and use of the nation's substance abuse and mental health data through SAMHDA. SAMHDA provides public-use data files, file documentation, and access to restricted-use data files to support a better understanding of this critical area of public health.
PhysioBank is a large and growing archive of well-characterized digital recordings of physiologic signals and related data for use by the biomedical research community. PhysioBank currently includes databases of multi-parameter cardiopulmonary, neural, and other biomedical signals from healthy subjects and patients with a variety of conditions with major public health implications, including sudden cardiac death, congestive heart failure, epilepsy, gait disorders, sleep apnea, and aging.
Knoema is a knowledge platform. The basic idea is to connect data with analytical and presentation tools. As a result, we end with one uniformed platform for users to access, present and share data-driven content. Within Knoema, we capture most aspects of a typical data use cycle: accessing data from multiple sources, bringing relevant indicators into a common space, visualizing figures, applying analytical functions, creating a set of dashboards, and presenting the outcome.
The United States Census Bureau (officially the Bureau of the Census, as defined in Title 13 U.S.C. ยง 11) is the government agency that is responsible for the United States Census. It also gathers other national demographic and economic data. As a part of the United States Department of Commerce, the Census Bureau serves as a leading source of data about America's people and economy. The most visible role of the Census Bureau is to perform the official decennial (every 10 years) count of people living in the U.S. The most important result is the reallocation of the number of seats each state is allowed in the House of Representatives, but the results also affect a range of government programs received by each state. The agency director is a political appointee selected by the President of the United States.