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Found 13 result(s)
INDEPTH is a global network of research centres that conduct longitudinal health and demographic evaluation of populations in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). INDEPTH aims to strengthen global capacity for Health and Demographic Surveillance Systems (HDSSs), and to mount multi-site research to guide health priorities and policies in LMICs, based on up-to-date scientific evidence. The data collected by the INDEPTH Network members constitute a valuable resource of population and health data for LMIC countries. This repository aims to make well documented anonymised longitudinal microdata from these Centres available to data users.
The data in the U of M’s Clinical Data Repository comes from the electronic health records (EHRs) of more than 2 million patients seen at 8 hospitals and more than 40 clinics. For each patient, data is available regarding the patient's demographics (age, gender, language, etc.), medical history, problem list, allergies, immunizations, outpatient vitals, diagnoses, procedures, medications, lab tests, visit locations, providers, provider specialties, and more.
The GHDx is our user-friendly and searchable data catalog for global health, demographic, and other health-related datasets. It provides detailed information about datasets ranging from censuses and surveys to health records and vital statistics, globally. It also serves as a platform for data owners to share their data with the public. The GDB Compare visualization, which allows the user to see rate of change in disease incidence, globally or by country, by age or across all ages, is especially powerful as a tool. Be sure to try adding a bottom chart, like the map, to augment the treemap that loads by default in the top chart.
This interface provides access to several types of data related to the Chesapeake Bay. Bay Program databases can be queried based upon user-defined inputs such as geographic region and date range. Each query results in a downloadable, tab- or comma-delimited text file that can be imported to any program (e.g., SAS, Excel, Access) for further analysis. Comments regarding the interface are encouraged. Questions in reference to the data should be addressed to the contact provided on subsequent pages.
The Growing Up Today Study is a collaborative study between clinicians, researchers, and thousands of participants across the US and beyond. The aim of this study is to gain a deeper understanding of the factors that affect health throughout life. Together we are working to building one of the most powerful resources for fighting cancer, obesity, heart disease, depression, and so much more.
PhysioNet is an on-line forum for the dissemination and exchange of recorded biomedical signals and open-source software for analyzing them. It provides facilities for the cooperative analysis of data and the evaluation of proposed new algorithms. In addition to providing free electronic access to PhysioBank data and PhysioToolkit software via the World Wide Web. PhysioNet offers services and training via on-line tutorials to assist users with varying levels of expertise. PhysioNet is a resource for biomedical research and development. It has three closely interdependent components: PhysioBank is a large and growing archive of well-characterized digital recordings of physiologic signals, time series, and related data for use by the biomedical research community. PhysioBank currently includes more than 60 collections of cardiopulmonary, neural, and other biomedical signals from healthy subjects and patients with a variety of conditions with major public health implications, including sudden cardiac death, congestive heart failure, epilepsy, gait disorders, sleep apnea, and aging. PhysioToolkit is a large and growing library of software for physiologic signal processing and analysis, detection of physiologically significant events using both classical techniques and novel methods based on statistical physics and nonlinear dynamics, interactive display and characterization of signals, creation of new databases, simulation of physiologic and other signals, quantitative evaluation and comparison of analysis methods, and analysis of nonequilibrium and nonstationary processes. PhysioNetWorks is a virtual laboratory where you can work together with us and with colleagues anywhere in the world to create, evaluate, improve, document, and prepare new data and software "works" for publication on PhysioNet. Unlike all other parts of the PhysioNet web site, access to PhysioNetWorks is password-protected. (Accounts are free and a password can be obtained in a minute or two.)
PhysioBank is a large and growing archive of well-characterized digital recordings of physiologic signals and related data for use by the biomedical research community. PhysioBank currently includes databases of multi-parameter cardiopulmonary, neural, and other biomedical signals from healthy subjects and patients with a variety of conditions with major public health implications, including sudden cardiac death, congestive heart failure, epilepsy, gait disorders, sleep apnea, and aging.
The United States Health Information Knowledgebase (USHIK) is an on-line, publicly accessible registry and repository of healthcare related data, metadata, and standards.
The National Collaborative on Childhood Obesity Research (NCCOR) brings together four of the nation's leading research funders — the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) — to address the problem of childhood obesity in America. The Tools of the NCCOR are: Catalogue of Surveillance Systems, Measures Registry and Registry of Studies.
Knoema is a knowledge platform. The basic idea is to connect data with analytical and presentation tools. As a result, we end with one uniformed platform for users to access, present and share data-driven content. Within Knoema, we capture most aspects of a typical data use cycle: accessing data from multiple sources, bringing relevant indicators into a common space, visualizing figures, applying analytical functions, creating a set of dashboards, and presenting the outcome.