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Found 124 result(s)
The IMSR is a searchable online database of mouse strains, stocks, and mutant ES cell lines available worldwide, including inbred, mutant, and genetically engineered strains. The goal of the IMSR is to assist the international scientific community in locating and obtaining mouse resources for research. Note that the data content found in the IMSR is as supplied by strain repository holders. For each strain or cell line listed in the IMSR, users can obtain information about: Where that resource is available (Repository Site); What state(s) the resource is available as (e.g. live, cryopreserved embryo or germplasm, ES cells); Links to descriptive information about a strain or ES cell line; Links to mutant alleles carried by a strain or ES cell line; Links for ordering a strain or ES cell line from a Repository; Links for contacting the Repository to send a query
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With ARS - Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance in Germany - the infrastructure for a nationwide surveillance of antimicrobial resistance has been established, which covers both the inpatient medical care and the ambulatory care sector. This is intended to reliable data on the epidemiology of antimicrobial resistance in Germany and differential statements provided by structural features of the health care and by region are possible. ARS is designed as a laboratory-based surveillance system for continuous collection of resistance data from routine for the full range of clinically relevant bacterial pathogens. Project participants and thus data suppliers are laboratories that analyze samples of medical facilities and doctors' offices microbiologically.
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Indian Genetic Disease Database (IGDD) is an initiative of CSIR Indian Institute of Chemical Biology. It is supported by Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) and Department of Biotechnology (DBT) of India. The Indian people represent one-sixth of the world population and consists of a ethnically, geographically, and genetically diverse population. In some communities the ratio of genetic disorder is relatively high due to consanguineous marriage practiced in the community. This database has been created to keep track of mutations in the causal genes for genetic diseases common in India and help the physicians, geneticists, and other professionals retrieve and use the information for the benefit of the public. The database includes scientific information about these genetic diseases and disabilities, but also statistical information about these diseases in today's society. Data is categorized by body part affected and then by title of the disease.
Clone DB contains information about genomic clones and cDNA and cell-based libraries for eukaryotic organisms. The database integrates this information with sequence data, map positions, and distributor information. At this time, Clone DB contains records for genomic clones and libraries, the collection of MICER mouse gene targeting clones and cell-based gene trap and gene targeting libraries from the International Knockout Mouse Consortium, Lexicon and the International Gene Trap Consortium. A planned expansion for Clone DB will add records for additional gene targeting and gene trap clones, as well as cDNA clones.
The UniProt Knowledgebase (UniProtKB) is the central hub for the collection of functional information on proteins, with accurate, consistent and rich annotation. In addition to capturing the core data mandatory for each UniProtKB entry (mainly, the amino acid sequence, protein name or description, taxonomic data and citation information), as much annotation information as possible is added. This includes widely accepted biological ontologies, classifications and cross-references, and clear indications of the quality of annotation in the form of evidence attribution of experimental and computational data. The Universal Protein Resource (UniProt) is a comprehensive resource for protein sequence and annotation data. The UniProt databases are the UniProt Knowledgebase (UniProtKB), the UniProt Reference Clusters (UniRef), and the UniProt Archive (UniParc). The UniProt Metagenomic and Environmental Sequences (UniMES) database is a repository specifically developed for metagenomic and environmental data. The UniProt Knowledgebase,is an expertly and richly curated protein database, consisting of two sections called UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot and UniProtKB/TrEMBL.
The Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative Information and Data Cooperative (GRIIDC) is a team of researchers, data specialists and computer system developers who are supporting the development of a data management system to store scientific data generated by Gulf of Mexico researchers. The Master Research Agreement between BP and the Gulf of Mexico Alliance that established the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (GoMRI) included provisions that all data collected or generated through the agreement must be made available to the public. The Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative Information and Data Cooperative (GRIIDC) is the vehicle through which GoMRI is fulfilling this requirement. The mission of GRIIDC is to ensure a data and information legacy that promotes continual scientific discovery and public awareness of the Gulf of Mexico Ecosystem.
The Cognitive Function and Ageing Studies (CFAS) are population based studies of individuals aged 65 years and over living in the community, including institutions, which is the only large multi-centred population-based study in the UK that has reached sufficient maturity. There are three main studies within the CFAS group. MRC CFAS, the original study began in 1989, with three of its sites providing a parent subset for the comparison two decades later with CFAS II (2008 onwards). Subsequently another CFAS study, CFAS Wales began in 2011.
The National Sleep Research Resource (NSRR) offers free web access to large collections of de-identified physiological signals and clinical data elements collected in well-characterized research cohorts and clinical trials.
BindingDB is a public, web-accessible database of measured binding affinities, focusing chiefly on the interactions of proteins considered to be candidate drug-targets with ligands that are small, drug-like molecules. BindingDB supports medicinal chemistry and drug discovery via literature awareness and development of structure-activity relations (SAR and QSAR); validation of computational chemistry and molecular modeling approaches such as docking, scoring and free energy methods; chemical biology and chemical genomics; and basic studies of the physical chemistry of molecular recognition. BindingDB also includes a small collection of host-guest binding data of interest to chemists studying supramolecular systems. The data collection derives from a variety of measurement techniques, including enzyme inhibition and kinetics, isothermal titration calorimetry, NMR, and radioligand and competition assays. BindingDB includes data extracted from the literature by the BindingDB project, selected PubChem confirmatory BioAssays, and ChEMBL entries for which a well defined protein target ("TARGET_TYPE='PROTEIN'") is provided. Data extracted by BindingDB typically includes more details regarding experimental conditions, etc
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The taxonomically broad EST database TBestDB serves as a repository for EST data from a wide range of eukaryotes, many of which have previously not been thoroughly investigated. Most of the data contained in TBestDB has been generated by the labs of the Protist EST Program located in six universities across Canada. PEP is a large interdisciplinaryresearch project, involving six Canadian universities. PEP aims at the exploration of the diversity of eukaryotic genomes in a systematic, comprehensive and integrated way. The focus is on unicellular microbial eukaryotes, known as protists. Protistan eukaryotes comprise more than a dozen major lineages that, together, encompass more evolutionary, ecological and probably biochemical diversity than the multicellular kingdoms of animals, plants and fungi combined. PEP is a unique endeavor in that it is the first phylogenetically-broad genomic investigation of protists.
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The Autism Chromosome Rearrangement Database is a collection of hand curated breakpoints and other genomic features, related to autism, taken from publicly available literature: databases and unpublished data. The database is continuously updated with information from in-house experimental data as well as data from published research studies.
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The RAMEDIS system is a platform independent, web-based information system for rare metabolic diseases based on filed case reports. It was developed in close cooperation with clinical partners to allow them to collect information on rare metabolic diseases with extensive details, e.g. about occurring symptoms, laboratory findings, therapy and molecular data.
Edinburgh DataShare is an online digital repository of multi-disciplinary research datasets produced at the University of Edinburgh, hosted by the Data Library in Information Services. Edinburgh University researchers who have produced research data associated with an existing or forthcoming publication, or which has potential use for other researchers, are invited to upload their dataset for sharing and safekeeping. A persistent identifier and suggested citation will be provided.
SSDA Dataverse is one of the archiving opportunities of SSDA, the others are: Data can be archived by SSDA itself (http://dataarchives.ss.ucla.edu/index.html) or by ICPSR or by UCLA Library or by California Digital Library. The Social Science Data Archives serves the UCLA campus as an archive of faculty and graduate student survey research. We provide long term storage of data files and documentation. We ensure that the data are useable in the future by migrating files to new operating systems. We follow government standards and archival best practices. The mission of the Social Science Data Archive has been and continues to be to provide a foundation for social science research with faculty support throughout an entire research project involving original data collection or the reuse of publicly available studies. Data Archive staff and researchers work as partners throughout all stages of the research process, beginning when a hypothesis or area of study is being developed, during grant and funding activities, while data collection and/or analysis is ongoing, and finally in long term preservation of research results. Our role is to provide a collaborative environment where the focus is on understanding the nature and scope of research approach and management of research output throughout the entire life cycle of the project. Instructional support, especially support that links research with instruction is also a mainstay of operations.
METLIN represents the largest MS/MS collection of data with the database generated at multiple collision energies and in positive and negative ionization modes. The data is generated on multiple instrument types including SCIEX, Agilent, Bruker and Waters QTOF mass spectrometers.
The GHDx is our user-friendly and searchable data catalog for global health, demographic, and other health-related datasets. It provides detailed information about datasets ranging from censuses and surveys to health records and vital statistics, globally. It also serves as a platform for data owners to share their data with the public. The GDB Compare visualization, which allows the user to see rate of change in disease incidence, globally or by country, by age or across all ages, is especially powerful as a tool. Be sure to try adding a bottom chart, like the map, to augment the treemap that loads by default in the top chart.
The Health and Medical Care Archive (HMCA) is the data archive of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), the largest philanthropy devoted exclusively to health and health care in the United States. Operated by the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR) at the University of Michigan, HMCA preserves and disseminates data collected by selected research projects funded by the Foundation and facilitates secondary analyses of the data. Our goal is to increase understanding of health and health care in the United States through secondary analysis of RWJF-supported data collections
OMIM is a comprehensive, authoritative compendium of human genes and genetic phenotypes that is freely available and updated daily. OMIM is authored and edited at the McKusick-Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, under the direction of Dr. Ada Hamosh. Its official home is omim.org.
Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (SIB) coordinates research and education in bioinformatics throughout Switzerland and provides bioinformatics services to the national and international research community. ExPASy gives access to numerous repositories and databases of SIB. For example: array map, MetaNetX, SWISS-MODEL and World-2DPAGE, and many others see a list here http://www.expasy.org/resources
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The Human Genetic Variation Database (HGVD) aims to provide a central resource to archive and display Japanese genetic variation and association between the variation and transcription level of genes. The database currently contains genetic variations determined by exome sequencing of 1,208 individuals and genotyping data of common variations obtained from a cohort of 3,248 individuals.
The Cancer Imaging Archive is a freely accessible repository containing medical images and supporting data from cancer patients. Images are stored in DICOM file format. The images are organized as “Collections”, typically patients related by a common disease (e.g. lung cancer), image modality (MRI, CT, etc) or research focus. Search functionality allows users to query across Collections or within them to filter out only the data they are most interested in.
dbEST is a division of GenBank that contains sequence data and other information on "single-pass" cDNA sequences, or "Expressed Sequence Tags", from a number of organisms. Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) are short (usually about 300-500 bp), single-pass sequence reads from mRNA (cDNA). Typically they are produced in large batches. They represent a snapshot of genes expressed in a given tissue and/or at a given developmental stage. They are tags (some coding, others not) of expression for a given cDNA library. Most EST projects develop large numbers of sequences. These are commonly submitted to GenBank and dbEST as batches of dozens to thousands of entries, with a great deal of redundancy in the citation, submitter and library information. To improve the efficiency of the submission process for this type of data, we have designed a special streamlined submission process and data format. dbEST also includes sequences that are longer than the traditional ESTs, or are produced as single sequences or in small batches. Among these sequences are products of differential display experiments and RACE experiments. The thing that these sequences have in common with traditional ESTs, regardless of length, quality, or quantity, is that there is little information that can be annotated in the record. If a sequence is later characterized and annotated with biological features such as a coding region, 5'UTR, or 3'UTR, it should be submitted through the regular GenBank submissions procedure (via BankIt or Sequin), even if part of the sequence is already in dbEST. dbEST is reserved for single-pass reads. Assembled sequences should not be submitted to dbEST. GenBank will accept assembled EST submissions for the forthcoming TSA (Transcriptome Shotgun Assembly) division. The individual reads which make up the assembly should be submitted to dbEST, the Trace archive or the Short Read Archive (SRA) prior to the submission of the assemblies.
The Gene database provides detailed information for known and predicted genes defined by nucleotide sequence or map position. Gene supplies gene-specific connections in the nexus of map, sequence, expression, structure, function, citation, and homology data. Unique identifiers are assigned to genes with defining sequences, genes with known map positions, and genes inferred from phenotypic information. These gene identifiers are used throughout NCBI's databases and tracked through updates of annotation. Gene includes genomes represented by NCBI Reference Sequences (or RefSeqs) and is integrated for indexing and query and retrieval from NCBI's Entrez and E-Utilities systems.