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Found 86 result(s)
Peptidome was a public repository that archived tandem mass spectrometry peptide and protein identification data generated by the scientific community. This repository is now offline and is in archival mode. All data may be obtained from the Peptidome FTP site. Due to budgetary constraints NCBI has discontinued the Peptidome Repository. All existing data and metadata files will continue to be made available from our ftp server a ftp://ftp.ncbi.nih.gov/pub/peptidome/ indefinitely. Those files are named according to their Peptidome accession number, allowing cited data to be identified and downloaded. All of the Peptidome studies have been made publicly available at the PRoteomics IDEntifications (PRIDE) database. A map of Peptidome to Pride accessions may be found at ftp://ftp.ncbi.nih.gov/pub/peptidome/peptidome-pride_map.txt. If you have any specific questions, please feel free to contact us at info@ncbi.nlm.nih.gov.
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The taxonomically broad EST database TBestDB serves as a repository for EST data from a wide range of eukaryotes, many of which have previously not been thoroughly investigated. Most of the data contained in TBestDB has been generated by the labs of the Protist EST Program located in six universities across Canada. PEP is a large interdisciplinaryresearch project, involving six Canadian universities. PEP aims at the exploration of the diversity of eukaryotic genomes in a systematic, comprehensive and integrated way. The focus is on unicellular microbial eukaryotes, known as protists. Protistan eukaryotes comprise more than a dozen major lineages that, together, encompass more evolutionary, ecological and probably biochemical diversity than the multicellular kingdoms of animals, plants and fungi combined. PEP is a unique endeavor in that it is the first phylogenetically-broad genomic investigation of protists.
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The JenAge Ageing Factor Database AgeFactDB is aimed at the collection and integration of ageing phenotype and lifespan data. Ageing factors are genes, chemical compounds or other factors such as dietary restriction, for example. In a first step ageing-related data are primarily taken from existing databases. In addition, new ageing-related information is included both by manual and automatic information extraction from the scientific literature. Based on a homology analysis, AgeFactDB also includes genes that are homologous to known ageing-related genes. These homologs are considered as candidate or putative ageing-related genes.
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Silkworm Pathogen Database (SilkPathDB) is a comprehensive resource for studying on pathogens of silkworm, including microsporidia, fungi, bacteria and virus. SilkPathDB provides access to not only genomic data including functional annotation of genes and gene products, but also extensive biological information for gene expression data and corresponding researches. SilkPathDB will be help with researches on pathogens of silkworm as well as other Lepidoptera insects.
The FREEBIRD website aims to facilitate data sharing in the area of injury and emergency research in a timely and responsible manner. It has been launched by providing open access to anonymised data on over 30,000 injured patients (the CRASH-1 and CRASH-2 trials).
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The RAMEDIS system is a platform independent, web-based information system for rare metabolic diseases based on filed case reports. It was developed in close cooperation with clinical partners to allow them to collect information on rare metabolic diseases with extensive details, e.g. about occurring symptoms, laboratory findings, therapy and molecular data.
SSDA Dataverse is one of the archiving opportunities of SSDA, the others are: Data can be archived by SSDA itself (http://dataarchives.ss.ucla.edu/index.html) or by ICPSR or by UCLA Library or by California Digital Library. The Social Science Data Archives serves the UCLA campus as an archive of faculty and graduate student survey research. We provide long term storage of data files and documentation. We ensure that the data are useable in the future by migrating files to new operating systems. We follow government standards and archival best practices. The mission of the Social Science Data Archive has been and continues to be to provide a foundation for social science research with faculty support throughout an entire research project involving original data collection or the reuse of publicly available studies. Data Archive staff and researchers work as partners throughout all stages of the research process, beginning when a hypothesis or area of study is being developed, during grant and funding activities, while data collection and/or analysis is ongoing, and finally in long term preservation of research results. Our role is to provide a collaborative environment where the focus is on understanding the nature and scope of research approach and management of research output throughout the entire life cycle of the project. Instructional support, especially support that links research with instruction is also a mainstay of operations.
METLIN represents the largest MS/MS collection of data with the database generated at multiple collision energies and in positive and negative ionization modes. The data is generated on multiple instrument types including SCIEX, Agilent, Bruker and Waters QTOF mass spectrometers.
The Brain Biodiversity Bank refers to the repository of images of and information about brain specimens contained in the collections associated with the National Museum of Health and Medicine at the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology in Washington, DC. These collections include, besides the Michigan State University Collection, the Welker Collection from the University of Wisconsin, the Yakovlev-Haleem Collection from Harvard University, the Meyer Collection from the Johns Hopkins University, and the Huber-Crosby and Crosby-Lauer Collections from the University of Michigan and the C.U. Ariëns Kappers brain collection from Amsterdam Netherlands.Introducing online atlases of the brains of humans, sheep, dolphins, and other animals. A world resource for illustrations of whole brains and stained sections from a great variety of mammals
TOXMAP® is a Geographic Information System (GIS) from the Division of Specialized Information Services of the US National Library of Medicine® (NLM) that uses maps of the United States and Canada to help users visually explore data primarily from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)'s Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) and Superfund Program.
Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (SIB) coordinates research and education in bioinformatics throughout Switzerland and provides bioinformatics services to the national and international research community. ExPASy gives access to numerous repositories and databases of SIB. For example: array map, MetaNetX, SWISS-MODEL and World-2DPAGE, and many others see a list here http://www.expasy.org/resources
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The Human Genetic Variation Database (HGVD) aims to provide a central resource to archive and display Japanese genetic variation and association between the variation and transcription level of genes. The database currently contains genetic variations determined by exome sequencing of 1,208 individuals and genotyping data of common variations obtained from a cohort of 3,248 individuals.
Climate4impact: a dedicated interface to ESGF for the climate impact community The portal Climate4impact, part of the ENES Data Infrastructure, provides access to data and quick looks of global and regional climate models and downscaled higher resolution climate data. The portal provides data transformation tooling and mapping & plotting capabilities, guidance, documentation, FAQ and examples.
OHSU Digital Commons is a repository for the scholarly and creative work of Oregon Health & Science University. Developed by the OHSU Library, Digital Commons provides the university community with a platform for publishing and accessing content produced by students, faculty, and staff. OHSU Digital Commons documents the history and growth of the university, as well as current progress in education, research, and health care.
HCUPnet is a free, on-line query system based on data from the healthcare cost and utilization project (HCUP). It provides access to health statistics and information on hospital inpatient and emergency departments. HCUP is used to identify, track, analyze, and compare hospital statistics at the national, regional, and state levels.
This interface provides access to several types of data related to the Chesapeake Bay. Bay Program databases can be queried based upon user-defined inputs such as geographic region and date range. Each query results in a downloadable, tab- or comma-delimited text file that can be imported to any program (e.g., SAS, Excel, Access) for further analysis. Comments regarding the interface are encouraged. Questions in reference to the data should be addressed to the contact provided on subsequent pages.
The Cancer Immunome Database (TCIA) provides results of comprehensive immunogenomic analyses of next generation sequencing data (NGS) data for 19 solid cancers from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and other datasource. The Cancer Immunome Atlas (TCIA) was developed and is maintained at the Division of Bioinformatics (ICBI). The database can be queried for the gene expression of specific immune-related gene sets, cellular composition of immune infiltrates (characterized using gene set enrichment analyses and deconvolution), neoantigens and cancer-germline antigens, HLA types, and tumor heterogeneity (estimated from cancer cell fractions). Moreover it provides survival analyses for different types immunological parameters. TCIA will be constantly updated with new data and results.
The Erythron Database is a resource dedicated to facilitating better understanding of the cellular and molecular underpinnings of mammalian erythropoiesis. The resource is built upon a searchable database of gene expression in murine primitive and definitive erythroid cells at progressive stages of maturation.
The Genome database contains annotations and analysis of eukaryotic and prokaryotic genomes, as well as tools that allow users to compare genomes and gene sequences from humans, microbes, plants, viruses and organelles. Users can browse by organism, and view genome maps and protein clusters.
VIPERdb is a database for icosahedral virus capsid structures . The emphasis of the resource is on providing data from structural and computational analyses on these systems, as well as high quality renderings for visual exploration. In addition, all virus capsids are placed in a single icosahedral orientation convention, facilitating comparison between different structures. The web site includes powerful search utilities , links to other relevant databases, background information on virus capsid structure, and useful database interface tools.
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MyTardis began at Monash University to solve the problem of users needing to store large datasets and share them with collaborators online. Its particular focus is on integration with scientific instruments, instrument facilities and research lab file storage. Our belief is that the less effort a researcher has to expend safely storing data, the more likely they are to do so. This approach has flourished with MyTardis capturing data from areas such as protein crystallography, electron microscopy, medical imaging and proteomics and with deployments at Australian institutions such as University of Queensland, RMIT, University of Sydney and the Australian Synchrotron. Data access via https://mytardis.massive.org.au/ and http://vera183.its.monash.edu.au/public_data/ and see 'remarks'.
AceView provides a curated, comprehensive and non-redundant sequence representation of all public mRNA sequences (mRNAs from GenBank or RefSeq, and single pass cDNA sequences from dbEST and Trace). These experimental cDNA sequences are first co-aligned on the genome then clustered into a minimal number of alternative transcript variants and grouped into genes. Using exhaustively and with high quality standards the available cDNA sequences evidences the beauty and complexity of mammals’ transcriptome, and the relative simplicity of the nematode and plant transcriptomes. Genes are classified according to their inferred coding potential; many presumably non-coding genes are discovered. Genes are named by Entrez Gene names when available, else by AceView gene names, stable from release to release. Alternative features (promoters, introns and exons, polyadenylation signals) and coding potential, including motifs, domains, and homologies are annotated in depth; tissues where expression has been observed are listed in order of representation; diseases, phenotypes, pathways, functions, localization or interactions are annotated by mining selected sources, in particular PubMed, GAD and Entrez Gene, and also by performing manual annotation, especially in the worm. In this way, both the anatomy and physiology of the experimentally cDNA supported human, mouse and nematode genes are thoroughly annotated.
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The Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) is a set of publicly available databases containing information on releases of specific toxic chemicals and their management as waste, as reported annually by U.S. industrial and federal facilities.
GENCODE is a scientific project in genome research and part of the ENCODE (ENCyclopedia Of DNA Elements) scale-up project. The GENCODE consortium was initially formed as part of the pilot phase of the ENCODE project to identify and map all protein-coding genes within the ENCODE regions (approx. 1% of Human genome). Given the initial success of the project, GENCODE now aims to build an “Encyclopedia of genes and genes variants” by identifying all gene features in the human and mouse genome using a combination of computational analysis, manual annotation, and experimental validation, and annotating all evidence-based gene features in the entire human genome at a high accuracy.