Reset all


Content Types


AID systems



Data access

Data access restrictions

Database access

Database access restrictions

Database licenses

Data licenses

Data upload

Data upload restrictions

Enhanced publication

Institution responsibility type

Institution type


Metadata standards

PID systems

Provider types

Quality management

Repository languages



Repository types


  • * at the end of a keyword allows wildcard searches
  • " quotes can be used for searching phrases
  • + represents an AND search (default)
  • | represents an OR search
  • - represents a NOT operation
  • ( and ) implies priority
  • ~N after a word specifies the desired edit distance (fuzziness)
  • ~N after a phrase specifies the desired slop amount
Found 54 result(s)
INDEPTH is a global network of research centres that conduct longitudinal health and demographic evaluation of populations in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). INDEPTH aims to strengthen global capacity for Health and Demographic Surveillance Systems (HDSSs), and to mount multi-site research to guide health priorities and policies in LMICs, based on up-to-date scientific evidence. The data collected by the INDEPTH Network members constitute a valuable resource of population and health data for LMIC countries. This repository aims to make well documented anonymised longitudinal microdata from these Centres available to data users.
The FREEBIRD website aims to facilitate data sharing in the area of injury and emergency research in a timely and responsible manner. It has been launched by providing open access to anonymised data on over 30,000 injured patients (the CRASH-1 and CRASH-2 trials).
The CARMEN pilot project seeks to create a virtual laboratory for experimental neurophysiology, enabling the sharing and collaborative exploitation of data, analysis code and expertise. This study by the DCC contributes to an understanding of the data curation requirements of the eScience community, through its extended observation of the CARMEN neurophysiology community’s specification and selection of solutions for the organisation, access and curation of digital research output.
Reactome is a manually curated, peer-reviewed pathway database, annotated by expert biologists and cross-referenced to bioinformatics databases. Its aim is to share information in the visual representations of biological pathways in a computationally accessible format. Pathway annotations are authored by expert biologists, in collaboration with Reactome editorial staff and cross-referenced to many bioinformatics databases. These include NCBI Gene, Ensembl and UniProt databases, the UCSC and HapMap Genome Browsers, the KEGG Compound and ChEBI small molecule databases, PubMed, and Gene Ontology.
Edinburgh DataShare is an online digital repository of multi-disciplinary research datasets produced at the University of Edinburgh, hosted by the Data Library in Information Services. Edinburgh University researchers who have produced research data associated with an existing or forthcoming publication, or which has potential use for other researchers, are invited to upload their dataset for sharing and safekeeping. A persistent identifier and suggested citation will be provided.
The UniProt Knowledgebase (UniProtKB) is the central hub for the collection of functional information on proteins, with accurate, consistent and rich annotation. In addition to capturing the core data mandatory for each UniProtKB entry (mainly, the amino acid sequence, protein name or description, taxonomic data and citation information), as much annotation information as possible is added. This includes widely accepted biological ontologies, classifications and cross-references, and clear indications of the quality of annotation in the form of evidence attribution of experimental and computational data. The Universal Protein Resource (UniProt) is a comprehensive resource for protein sequence and annotation data. The UniProt databases are the UniProt Knowledgebase (UniProtKB), the UniProt Reference Clusters (UniRef), and the UniProt Archive (UniParc). The UniProt Metagenomic and Environmental Sequences (UniMES) database is a repository specifically developed for metagenomic and environmental data. The UniProt Knowledgebase,is an expertly and richly curated protein database, consisting of two sections called UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot and UniProtKB/TrEMBL.
The Cognitive Function and Ageing Studies (CFAS) are population based studies of individuals aged 65 years and over living in the community, including institutions, which is the only large multi-centred population-based study in the UK that has reached sufficient maturity. There are three main studies within the CFAS group. MRC CFAS, the original study began in 1989, with three of its sites providing a parent subset for the comparison two decades later with CFAS II (2008 onwards). Subsequently another CFAS study, CFAS Wales began in 2011.
The WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network (WWARN) is a collaborative platform generating innovative resources and reliable evidence to inform the malaria community on the factors affecting the efficacy of antimalarial medicines. Access to data is provided through diverse Tools and Resources: WWARN Explorer, Molecular Surveyor K13 Methodology, Molecular Surveyor pfmdr1 & pfcrt, Molecular Surveyor dhfr & dhps.
THIN has created a medical research database of anonymised patient records from information entered by general practices in their ViSion systems. THIN will supply anonymised data (with the identities of patients and practices fully protected) to approved researchers for drug safety and epidemiological studies. Such research will be approved by the appropriate ethics/scientific committee. The anonymised patient data will be collected from the practice's Vision clinical system, with the help of In Practice Systems, on a regular basis without interruption to the running of the system. CSD Medical Research UK can supply non-interventional, anonymised, longitudinal patient data for UK, France, Italy, Germany, Spain, Belgium and Australia. Data for the USA will be available in the near future.
The IMPC is a confederation of international mouse phenotyping projects working towards the agreed goals of the consortium: To undertake the phenotyping of 20,000 mouse mutants over a ten year period, providing the first functional annotation of a mammalian genome. Maintain and expand a world-wide consortium of institutions with capacity and expertise to produce germ line transmission of targeted knockout mutations in embryonic stem cells for 20,000 known and predicted mouse genes. Test each mutant mouse line through a broad based primary phenotyping pipeline in all the major adult organ systems and most areas of major human disease. Through this activity and employing data annotation tools, systematically aim to discover and ascribe biological function to each gene, driving new ideas and underpinning future research into biological systems; Maintain and expand collaborative “networks” with specialist phenotyping consortia or laboratories, providing standardized secondary level phenotyping that enriches the primary dataset, and end-user, project specific tertiary level phenotyping that adds value to the mammalian gene functional annotation and fosters hypothesis driven research; and Provide a centralized data centre and portal for free, unrestricted access to primary and secondary data by the scientific community, promoting sharing of data, genotype-phenotype annotation, standard operating protocols, and the development of open source data analysis tools. Members of the IMPC may include research centers, funding organizations and corporations.
GOBASE is a taxonomically broad organelle genome database that organizes and integrates diverse data related to mitochondria and chloroplasts. GOBASE is currently expanding to include information on representative bacteria that are thought to be specifically related to the bacterial ancestors of mitochondria and chloroplasts
GENCODE is a scientific project in genome research and part of the ENCODE (ENCyclopedia Of DNA Elements) scale-up project. The GENCODE consortium was initially formed as part of the pilot phase of the ENCODE project to identify and map all protein-coding genes within the ENCODE regions (approx. 1% of Human genome). Given the initial success of the project, GENCODE now aims to build an “Encyclopedia of genes and genes variants” by identifying all gene features in the human and mouse genome using a combination of computational analysis, manual annotation, and experimental validation, and annotating all evidence-based gene features in the entire human genome at a high accuracy.
CODEX is a database of NGS mouse and human experiments. Although, the main focus of CODEX is Haematopoiesis and Embryonic systems, the database includes a large variety of cell types. In addition to the publically available data, CODEX also includes a private site hosting non-published data. CODEX provides access to processed and curated NGS experiments. To use CODEX: (i) select a specialized repository (HAEMCODE or ESCODE) or choose the whole compendium (CODEX), then (ii) filter by organism and (iii) choose how to explore the database.
Content type(s)
The IDR makes datasets that have never previously been accessible publicly available, allowing the community to search, view, mine and even process and analyze large, complex, multidimensional life sciences image data. Sharing data promotes the validation of experimental methods and scientific conclusions, the comparison with new data obtained by the global scientific community, and enables data reuse by developers of new analysis and processing tools.
The Twenty-07 Study was set up in 1986 in order to investigate the reasons for differences in health by socio-economic circumstances, gender, area of residence, age, ethnic group, and family type. 4510 people are being followed for 20 years. The initial wave of data collection took place in 1987/8, when respondents were aged 15, 35 and 55. The final wave of data collection took place in 2007/08 when respondents were aged 35, 55 and 75. In this way the Twenty-07 Study provides us with unique opportunities to investigate both the changes in people's lives over 20 years and how they affect their health, and the differences in people's experiences at the same ages 20 years apart, and how these have different effects on their health.
DDBJ; DNA Data Bank of Japan is the sole nucleotide sequence data bank in Asia, which is officially certified to collect nucleotide sequences from researchers and to issue the internationally recognized accession number to data submitters.Since we exchange the collected data with EMBL-Bank/EBI; European Bioinformatics Institute and GenBank/NCBI; National Center for Biotechnology Information on a daily basis, the three data banks share virtually the same data at any given time. The virtually unified database is called "INSD; International Nucleotide Sequence Database DDBJ collects sequence data mainly from Japanese researchers, but of course accepts data and issue the accession number to researchers in any other countries.
Content type(s)
MIRAGE is developing a warehouse of medical images to facilitate effective online retrieval tools in the institutional web site to complement the existing online e-leaning and teaching system OASISplus, also known as Blackboard Vista , that is currently in operation at Middlesex University (MU); Follow-up project MIRAGE 2011:
STOREDB is a platform for the archiving and sharing of primary data and outputs of all kinds, including epidemiological and experimental data, from research on the effects of radiation. It also provides a directory of bioresources and databases containing information and materials that investigators are willing to share. STORE supports the creation of a radiation research commons.
Content type(s)
Wellcome Images is one of the Wellcome Library's major visual collections and also forms part of Wellcome Collection. Wellcome Images is one of the world's richest and most unique collections, with themes ranging from medical and social history to contemporary healthcare and biomedical science. This unrivalled collection contains historical images from the Wellcome Library collections, Tibetan Buddhist paintings, ancient Sanskrit manuscripts written on palm leaves, beautifully illuminated Persian books and much more.
The Africa Centre offers longitudinal datasets from a rural demographic in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa where HIV prevalence is extremely high. The data may be filtered by demographics, years, or by individuals questionnaires. The Africa Centre requests notification that anyone contact them when downloading their data. Since January 2000, the Africa Centre For Population Health has built up an extensive longitudinal database of demographic, social, medical and economic information about the members of its Demographic Surveillance Area, which is situated in a rural area of northern KwaZulu-Natal. It has developed from this database, the following suite of datasets which can be used both internally within the organisation, and by other researchers.
!! OFFLINE !! A recent computer security audit has revealed security flaws in the legacy HapMap site that require NCBI to take it down immediately. We regret the inconvenience, but we are required to do this. That said, NCBI was planning to decommission this site in the near future anyway (although not quite so suddenly), as the 1,000 genomes (1KG) project has established itself as a research standard for population genetics and genomics. NCBI has observed a decline in usage of the HapMap dataset and website with its available resources over the past five years and it has come to the end of its useful life. The International HapMap Project is a multi-country effort to identify and catalog genetic similarities and differences in human beings. Using the information in the HapMap, researchers will be able to find genes that affect health, disease, and individual responses to medications and environmental factors. The Project is a collaboration among scientists and funding agencies from Japan, the United Kingdom, Canada, China, Nigeria, and the United States. All of the information generated by the Project will be released into the public domain. The goal of the International HapMap Project is to compare the genetic sequences of different individuals to identify chromosomal regions where genetic variants are shared. By making this information freely available, the Project will help biomedical researchers find genes involved in disease and responses to therapeutic drugs. In the initial phase of the Project, genetic data are being gathered from four populations with African, Asian, and European ancestry. Ongoing interactions with members of these populations are addressing potential ethical issues and providing valuable experience in conducting research with identified populations. Public and private organizations in six countries are participating in the International HapMap Project. Data generated by the Project can be downloaded with minimal constraints. The Project officially started with a meeting in October 2002 ( and is expected to take about three years.