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Found 26 result(s)
The objective of this Research Coordination Network project is to develop an international network of researchers who use genetic methodologies to study the ecology and evolution of marine organisms in the Indo-Pacific to share data, ideas and methods. The tropical Indian and Pacific Oceans encompass the largest biogeographic region on the planet, the Indo-Pacific
The WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network (WWARN) is a collaborative platform generating innovative resources and reliable evidence to inform the malaria community on the factors affecting the efficacy of antimalarial medicines. Access to data is provided through diverse Tools and Resources: WWARN Explorer, Molecular Surveyor K13 Methodology, Molecular Surveyor pfmdr1 & pfcrt, Molecular Surveyor dhfr & dhps.
Exposome-Explorer is the first database dedicated to biomarkers of exposure to environmental risk factors for diseases. It contains detailed information on the nature of biomarkers, populations and subjects where measured, samples analyzed, methods used for biomarker analyses, concentrations in biospecimens, correlations with external exposure measurements, and biological reproducibility over time.
SSDA Dataverse is one of the archiving opportunities of SSDA, the others are: Data can be archived by SSDA itself (http://dataarchives.ss.ucla.edu/index.html) or by ICPSR or by UCLA Library or by California Digital Library. The Social Science Data Archives serves the UCLA campus as an archive of faculty and graduate student survey research. We provide long term storage of data files and documentation. We ensure that the data are useable in the future by migrating files to new operating systems. We follow government standards and archival best practices. The mission of the Social Science Data Archive has been and continues to be to provide a foundation for social science research with faculty support throughout an entire research project involving original data collection or the reuse of publicly available studies. Data Archive staff and researchers work as partners throughout all stages of the research process, beginning when a hypothesis or area of study is being developed, during grant and funding activities, while data collection and/or analysis is ongoing, and finally in long term preservation of research results. Our role is to provide a collaborative environment where the focus is on understanding the nature and scope of research approach and management of research output throughout the entire life cycle of the project. Instructional support, especially support that links research with instruction is also a mainstay of operations.
Climate4impact: a dedicated interface to ESGF for the climate impact community The portal Climate4impact, part of the ENES Data Infrastructure, provides access to data and quick looks of global and regional climate models and downscaled higher resolution climate data. The portal provides data transformation tooling and mapping & plotting capabilities, guidance, documentation, FAQ and examples.
The Brain Transcriptome Database (BrainTx) project aims to create an integrated platform to visualize and analyze our original transcriptome data and publicly accessible transcriptome data related to the genetics that underlie the development, function, and dysfunction stages and states of the brain.
GeneCards is a searchable, integrative database that provides comprehensive, user-friendly information on all annotated and predicted human genes. It automatically integrates gene-centric data from ~125 web sources, including genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, genetic, clinical and functional information.
The IMPC is a confederation of international mouse phenotyping projects working towards the agreed goals of the consortium: To undertake the phenotyping of 20,000 mouse mutants over a ten year period, providing the first functional annotation of a mammalian genome. Maintain and expand a world-wide consortium of institutions with capacity and expertise to produce germ line transmission of targeted knockout mutations in embryonic stem cells for 20,000 known and predicted mouse genes. Test each mutant mouse line through a broad based primary phenotyping pipeline in all the major adult organ systems and most areas of major human disease. Through this activity and employing data annotation tools, systematically aim to discover and ascribe biological function to each gene, driving new ideas and underpinning future research into biological systems; Maintain and expand collaborative “networks” with specialist phenotyping consortia or laboratories, providing standardized secondary level phenotyping that enriches the primary dataset, and end-user, project specific tertiary level phenotyping that adds value to the mammalian gene functional annotation and fosters hypothesis driven research; and Provide a centralized data centre and portal for free, unrestricted access to primary and secondary data by the scientific community, promoting sharing of data, genotype-phenotype annotation, standard operating protocols, and the development of open source data analysis tools. Members of the IMPC may include research centers, funding organizations and corporations.
Content type(s)
The IDR makes datasets that have never previously been accessible publicly available, allowing the community to search, view, mine and even process and analyze large, complex, multidimensional life sciences image data. Sharing data promotes the validation of experimental methods and scientific conclusions, the comparison with new data obtained by the global scientific community, and enables data reuse by developers of new analysis and processing tools.
PSI is a global health organization dedicated to improving the health of people in the developing world by focusing on serious challenges like a lack of family planning, HIV and AIDS, barriers to maternal health, and the greatest threats to children under five, including malaria, diarrhea, pneumonia and malnutrition. A hallmark of PSI is a commitment to the principle that health services and products are most effective when they are accompanied by robust communications and distribution efforts that help ensure wide acceptance and proper use. PSI works in partnership with local governments, ministries of health and local organizations to create health solutions that are built to last. We use original data to monitor and evaluate our programs, generate consumer insight, estimate the impact of our solutions, and evaluate the health of the markets we work to strengthen.
The Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC) is a coalition of investigators seeking to aggregate and harmonize exome sequencing data from a wide variety of large-scale sequencing projects, and to make summary data available for the wider scientific community. The data set provided on this website spans 60,706 unrelated individuals sequenced as part of various disease-specific and population genetic studies.
The Africa Centre offers longitudinal datasets from a rural demographic in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa where HIV prevalence is extremely high. The data may be filtered by demographics, years, or by individuals questionnaires. The Africa Centre requests notification that anyone contact them when downloading their data. Since January 2000, the Africa Centre For Population Health has built up an extensive longitudinal database of demographic, social, medical and economic information about the members of its Demographic Surveillance Area, which is situated in a rural area of northern KwaZulu-Natal. It has developed from this database, the following suite of datasets which can be used both internally within the organisation, and by other researchers.
!! OFFLINE !! A recent computer security audit has revealed security flaws in the legacy HapMap site that require NCBI to take it down immediately. We regret the inconvenience, but we are required to do this. That said, NCBI was planning to decommission this site in the near future anyway (although not quite so suddenly), as the 1,000 genomes (1KG) project has established itself as a research standard for population genetics and genomics. NCBI has observed a decline in usage of the HapMap dataset and website with its available resources over the past five years and it has come to the end of its useful life. The International HapMap Project is a multi-country effort to identify and catalog genetic similarities and differences in human beings. Using the information in the HapMap, researchers will be able to find genes that affect health, disease, and individual responses to medications and environmental factors. The Project is a collaboration among scientists and funding agencies from Japan, the United Kingdom, Canada, China, Nigeria, and the United States. All of the information generated by the Project will be released into the public domain. The goal of the International HapMap Project is to compare the genetic sequences of different individuals to identify chromosomal regions where genetic variants are shared. By making this information freely available, the Project will help biomedical researchers find genes involved in disease and responses to therapeutic drugs. In the initial phase of the Project, genetic data are being gathered from four populations with African, Asian, and European ancestry. Ongoing interactions with members of these populations are addressing potential ethical issues and providing valuable experience in conducting research with identified populations. Public and private organizations in six countries are participating in the International HapMap Project. Data generated by the Project can be downloaded with minimal constraints. The Project officially started with a meeting in October 2002 (https://www.genome.gov/10005336/) and is expected to take about three years.
PDBj (Protein Data Bank Japan) provides a centralized PDB archive of macromolecular structures, integrated tools for data retrieval, visualization, and functional characterization. PDBj is supported by JST-NBDC and Osaka University.
Homomint is a web available tool extending protein-protein interactions experimentally verified in models organisms, to the orthologous proteins in Homo sapiens. Similar to other approaches, the orthology groups in HomoMINT are obtained by the reciprocal best hit method as implemented in the Inparanoid algorithm.
The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study is one of the largest cohort studies in the world, with more than half a million (521 000) participants recruited across 10 European countries and followed for almost 15 years. EPIC was designed to investigate the relationships between diet, nutritional status, lifestyle and environmental factors, and the incidence of cancer and other chronic diseases. EPIC investigators are active in all fields of epidemiology, and important contributions have been made in nutritional epidemiology using biomarker analysis and questionnaire information, as well as genetic and lifestyle investigations.
InnateDB is a publicly available database of the genes, proteins, experimentally-verified interactions and signaling pathways involved in the innate immune response of humans, mice and bovines to microbial infection. The database captures an improved coverage of the innate immunity interactome by integrating known interactions and pathways from major public databases together with manually-curated data into a centralised resource. The database can be mined as a knowledgebase or used with our integrated bioinformatics and visualization tools for the systems level analysis of the innate immune response.
CTRI is a free, online public record system for registration of clinical trials being conducted in India since 2007. Initiated as a voluntary measure, since 2009 trial registration in the CTRI has been made mandatory by the Drugs Controller General of India (DCGI). While this register is meant primarily for trials conducted in India, the CTRI will also accept registration of trials conducted in other countries in the region, which do not have a Primary Registry of its own. Registered trials on CTRI are freely searchable from the WHO's search portal and the ICTRP, as well as from the CTRI site.
Content type(s)
The Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR) is an online register of clinical trials being undertaken in Australia, New Zealand and elsewhere. The ANZCTR includes trials from the full spectrum of therapeutic areas of pharmaceuticals, surgical procedures, preventive measures, lifestyle, devices, treatment and rehabilitation strategies and complementary therapies.
Knoema is a knowledge platform. The basic idea is to connect data with analytical and presentation tools. As a result, we end with one uniformed platform for users to access, present and share data-driven content. Within Knoema, we capture most aspects of a typical data use cycle: accessing data from multiple sources, bringing relevant indicators into a common space, visualizing figures, applying analytical functions, creating a set of dashboards, and presenting the outcome.
MalaCards is an integrated database of human maladies and their annotations, modeled on the architecture and richness of the popular GeneCards database of human genes. MalaCards mines and merges varied web data sources to generate a computerized web card for each human disease. Each MalaCard contains disease specific prioritized annotative information, as well as links between associated diseases, leveraging the GeneCards relational database, search engine, and GeneDecks set-distillation tool. As proofs of concept of the search/distill/infer pipeline we find expected elucidations, as well as potentially novel ones.
The United Nations Data (UND) site provides access to 33 databases and over 60million records. UN Statistical Databases include datasets on Energy Statistics, International Finances, The State of the World’s Children, and World Contraceptive Use; among many other global social, environmental and economic subjects.
The Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI) is a multi-center, longitudinal, prospective observational study of knee osteoarthritis (OA). The overall aim of the OAI is to develop a public domain research resource to facilitate the scientific evaluation of biomarkers for osteoarthritis as potential surrogate endpoints for disease onset and progression.
The International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) seeks sustainable solutions for ending hunger and poverty. In collaboration with institutions throughout the world, IFPRI is often involved in the collection of primary data and the compilation and processing of secondary data. The resulting datasets provide a wealth of information at the local (household and community), national, and global levels. IFPRI freely distributes as many of these datasets as possible and encourages their use in research and policy analysis. IFPRI Dataverse contains following dataverses: Agricultural Science and Knowledge Indicators - ASTI, HarvestChoice, Statistics on Public Expenditures for Economic Development - SPEED, International Model for Policy Analysis of Agricultural Commodities and Trade - IMPACT, Africa RISING Dataverse and Food Security Portal Dataverse.