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Found 29 result(s)
The UniProt Knowledgebase (UniProtKB) is the central hub for the collection of functional information on proteins, with accurate, consistent and rich annotation. In addition to capturing the core data mandatory for each UniProtKB entry (mainly, the amino acid sequence, protein name or description, taxonomic data and citation information), as much annotation information as possible is added. This includes widely accepted biological ontologies, classifications and cross-references, and clear indications of the quality of annotation in the form of evidence attribution of experimental and computational data. The Universal Protein Resource (UniProt) is a comprehensive resource for protein sequence and annotation data. The UniProt databases are the UniProt Knowledgebase (UniProtKB), the UniProt Reference Clusters (UniRef), and the UniProt Archive (UniParc). The UniProt Metagenomic and Environmental Sequences (UniMES) database is a repository specifically developed for metagenomic and environmental data. The UniProt Knowledgebase,is an expertly and richly curated protein database, consisting of two sections called UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot and UniProtKB/TrEMBL.
Intrepid Bioinformatics serves as a community for genetic researchers and scientific programmers who need to achieve meaningful use of their genetic research data – but can’t spend tremendous amounts of time or money in the process. The Intrepid Bioinformatics system automates time consuming manual processes, shortens workflow, and eliminates the threat of lost data in a faster, cheaper, and better environment than existing solutions. The system also provides the functionality and community features needed to analyze the large volumes of Next Generation Sequencing and Single Nucleotide Polymorphism data, which is generated for a wide range of purposes from disease tracking and animal breeding to medical diagnosis and treatment.
The CARMEN pilot project seeks to create a virtual laboratory for experimental neurophysiology, enabling the sharing and collaborative exploitation of data, analysis code and expertise. This study by the DCC contributes to an understanding of the data curation requirements of the eScience community, through its extended observation of the CARMEN neurophysiology community’s specification and selection of solutions for the organisation, access and curation of digital research output.
MGI is the international database resource for the laboratory mouse, providing integrated genetic, genomic, and biological data to facilitate the study of human health and disease. The projects contributing to this resource are: Mouse Genome Database (MGD) Project, Gene Expression Database (GXD) Project, Mouse Tumor Biology (MTB) Database Project, Gene Ontology (GO) Project at MGI, MouseMine Project, MouseCyc Project at MGI
OMIM is a comprehensive, authoritative compendium of human genes and genetic phenotypes that is freely available and updated daily. OMIM is authored and edited at the McKusick-Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, under the direction of Dr. Ada Hamosh. Its official home is omim.org.
VIPERdb is a database for icosahedral virus capsid structures . The emphasis of the resource is on providing data from structural and computational analyses on these systems, as well as high quality renderings for visual exploration. In addition, all virus capsids are placed in a single icosahedral orientation convention, facilitating comparison between different structures. The web site includes powerful search utilities , links to other relevant databases, background information on virus capsid structure, and useful database interface tools.
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MyTardis began at Monash University to solve the problem of users needing to store large datasets and share them with collaborators online. Its particular focus is on integration with scientific instruments, instrument facilities and research lab file storage. Our belief is that the less effort a researcher has to expend safely storing data, the more likely they are to do so. This approach has flourished with MyTardis capturing data from areas such as protein crystallography, electron microscopy, medical imaging and proteomics and with deployments at Australian institutions such as University of Queensland, RMIT, University of Sydney and the Australian Synchrotron. Data access via https://mytardis.massive.org.au/ and http://vera183.its.monash.edu.au/public_data/ and see 'remarks'.
GENCODE is a scientific project in genome research and part of the ENCODE (ENCyclopedia Of DNA Elements) scale-up project. The GENCODE consortium was initially formed as part of the pilot phase of the ENCODE project to identify and map all protein-coding genes within the ENCODE regions (approx. 1% of Human genome). Given the initial success of the project, GENCODE now aims to build an “Encyclopedia of genes and genes variants” by identifying all gene features in the human and mouse genome using a combination of computational analysis, manual annotation, and experimental validation, and annotating all evidence-based gene features in the entire human genome at a high accuracy.
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The IDR makes datasets that have never previously been accessible publicly available, allowing the community to search, view, mine and even process and analyze large, complex, multidimensional life sciences image data. Sharing data promotes the validation of experimental methods and scientific conclusions, the comparison with new data obtained by the global scientific community, and enables data reuse by developers of new analysis and processing tools.
This site is dedicated to making high value health data more accessible to entrepreneurs, researchers, and policy makers in the hopes of better health outcomes for all. In a recent article, Todd Park, United States Chief Technology Officer, captured the essence of what the Health Data Initiative is all about and why our efforts here are so important.
The CDHA assists researchers to create, document, and distribute public use microdata on health and aging for secondary analysis. Major research themes include: midlife development and aging; economics of population aging; inequalities in health and aging; international comparative studies of health and aging; and the investigation of linkages between social-demographic and biomedical research in population aging. The CDHA is one of fourteen demography centers on aging sponsored by the National Institute on Aging.
The National Practitioner Data Bank (NPDB), or "the Data Bank," is a confidential information clearinghouse created by Congress with the primary goals of improving health care quality, protecting the public, and reducing health care fraud and abuse in the U.S.
The Evidence-based Practice Center (EPC) at Tufts Medical Center, with support from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), has developed the Systematic Review Data Repository (SRDR), which is a Web-based tool for data extraction and storage of systematic review data. Potential users include patients, policy makers/stakeholders, independent researchers, research centers, and funders of research.
The Protein Data Bank (PDB) is an archive of experimentally determined three-dimensional structures of biological macromolecules that serves a global community of researchers, educators, and students. The data contained in the archive include atomic coordinates, crystallographic structure factors and NMR experimental data. Aside from coordinates, each deposition also includes the names of molecules, primary and secondary structure information, sequence database references, where appropriate, and ligand and biological assembly information, details about data collection and structure solution, and bibliographic citations. The Worldwide Protein Data Bank (wwPDB) consists of organizations that act as deposition, data processing and distribution centers for PDB data. Members are: RCSB PDB (USA), PDBe (Europe) and PDBj (Japan), and BMRB (USA). The wwPDB's mission is to maintain a single PDB archive of macromolecular structural data that is freely and publicly available to the global community.
MEASURE DHS is advancing global understanding of health and population trends in developing countries through nationally-representative household surveys that provide data for a wide range of monitoring and impact evaluation indicators in the areas of population, health, HIV, and nutrition. The database collects, analyzes, and disseminates data from more than 300 surveys in over 90 countries. MEASURE DHS distributes, at no cost, survey data files for legitimate academic research.
The CPTAC Data Portal is the centralized repository for the dissemination of proteomic data collected by the Proteome Characterization Centers (PCCs) for the CPTAC program. The portal also hosts analyses of the mass spectrometry data (mapping of spectra to peptide sequences and protein identification) from the PCCs and from a CPTAC-sponsored common data analysis pipeline (CDAP).
The Open PHACTS project will develop an open source, open standards and open access innovation platform, Open Pharmacological Space (OPS), via a semantic web approach. OPS will comprise data, vocabularies and infrastructure needed to accelerate drugoriented research. This semantic integration hub will address key bottlenecks in small molecule drug discovery: disparate information sources, lack of standards and shared concept identifiers, guided by well defined research questions assembled from participating drug discovery teams. Open PHACTS draws together multiple sources of publicly-available pharmacological and physicochemical data, accessible via the Open PHACTS Explorer, an intuitive interface, and the powerful Open PHACTS API.
The United States Health Information Knowledgebase (USHIK) is an on-line, publicly accessible registry and repository of healthcare related data, metadata, and standards.
The Conserved Domain Database is a resource for the annotation of functional units in proteins. Its collection of domain models includes a set curated by NCBI, which utilizes 3D structure to provide insights into sequence/structure/function relationships
The GHO data repository provides access to over 50 datasets on priority health topics including mortality and burden of diseases, the Millennium Development Goals (child nutrition, child health, maternal and reproductive health, immunization, HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria, neglected diseases, water and sanitation), non communicable diseases and risk factors, epidemic-prone diseases, health systems, environmental health, violence and injuries, equity among others. In addition, the GHO provides on-line access to WHO's annual summary of health-related data for its Member states: the World Health Statistics.
Knoema is a knowledge platform. The basic idea is to connect data with analytical and presentation tools. As a result, we end with one uniformed platform for users to access, present and share data-driven content. Within Knoema, we capture most aspects of a typical data use cycle: accessing data from multiple sources, bringing relevant indicators into a common space, visualizing figures, applying analytical functions, creating a set of dashboards, and presenting the outcome.
The Ensembl project produces genome databases for vertebrates and other eukaryotic species. Ensembl is a joint project between the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute (WTSI) to develop a software system that produces and maintains automatic annotation on selected genomes.The Ensembl project was started in 1999, some years before the draft human genome was completed. Even at that early stage it was clear that manual annotation of 3 billion base pairs of sequence would not be able to offer researchers timely access to the latest data. The goal of Ensembl was therefore to automatically annotate the genome, integrate this annotation with other available biological data and make all this publicly available via the web. Since the website's launch in July 2000, many more genomes have been added to Ensembl and the range of available data has also expanded to include comparative genomics, variation and regulatory data. Ensembl is a joint project between European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI), an outstation of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute (WTSI). Both institutes are located on the Wellcome Trust Genome Campus in Hinxton, south of the city of Cambridge, United Kingdom.