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Found 27 result(s)
The Entrez Protein Clusters database contains annotation information, publications, structures and analysis tools for related protein sequences encoded by complete genomes. The data available in the Protein Clusters Database is generated from prokaryotic genomic studies and is intended to assist researchers studying micro-organism evolution as well as other biological sciences. Available genomes include plants and viruses as well as organelles and microbial genomes.
The tree of life links all biodiversity through a shared evolutionary history. This project will produce the first online, comprehensive first-draft tree of all 1.8 million named species, accessible to both the public and scientific communities. Assembly of the tree will incorporate previously-published results, with strong collaborations between computational and empirical biologists to develop, test and improve methods of data synthesis. This initial tree of life will not be static; instead, we will develop tools for scientists to update and revise the tree as new data come in. Early release of the tree and tools will motivate data sharing and facilitate ongoing synthesis of knowledge.
The Expression Atlas provides information on gene expression patterns under different biological conditions such as a gene knock out, a plant treated with a compound, or in a particular organism part or cell. It includes both microarray and RNA-seq data. The data is re-analysed in-house to detect interesting expression patterns under the conditions of the original experiment. There are two components to the Expression Atlas, the Baseline Atlas and the Differential Atlas. The Baseline Atlas displays information about which gene products are present (and at what abundance) in "normal" conditions (e.g. tissue, cell type). It aims to answer questions such as "which genes are specifically expressed in human kidney?". This component of the Expression Atlas consists of highly-curated and quality-checked RNA-seq experiments from ArrayExpress. It has data for many different animal and plant species. New experiments are added as they become available. The Differential Atlas allows users to identify genes that are up- or down-regulated in a wide variety of different experimental conditions such as yeast mutants, cadmium treated plants, cystic fibrosis or the effect on gene expression of mind-body practice. Both microarray and RNA-seq experiments are included in the Differential Atlas. Experiments are selected from ArrayExpress and groups of samples are manually identified for comparison e.g. those with wild type genotype compared to those with a gene knock out. Each experiment is processed through our in-house differential expression statistical analysis pipeline to identify genes with a high probability of differential expression.
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Morph·D·Base has been developed to serve scientific research and education. It provides a platform for storing the detailed documentation of all material, methods, procedures, and concepts applied, together with the specific parameters, values, techniques, and instruments used during morphological data production. In other words, it's purpose is to provide a publicly available resource for recording and documenting morphological metadata. Moreover, it is also a repository for different types of media files that can be uploaded in order to serve as support and empirical substantiation of the results of morphological investigations. Our long-term perspective with Morph·D·Base is to provide an instrument that will enable a highly formalized and standardized way of generating morphological descriptions using a morphological ontology that will be based on the web ontology language (OWL - http://www.w3.org/TR/owl-features/). This, however, represents a project that is still in development.
MycoCosm, the DOE JGI’s web-based fungal genomics resource, which integrates fungal genomics data and analytical tools for fungal biologists. It provides navigation through sequenced genomes, genome analysis in context of comparative genomics and genome-centric view. MycoCosm promotes user community participation in data submission, annotation and analysis.
Antarctic marine and terrestrial biodiversity data is widely scattered, patchy and often not readily accessible. In many cases the data is in danger of being irretrievably lost. Biodiversity.aq establishes and supports a distributed system of interoperable databases, giving easy access through a single internet portal to a set of resources relevant to research, conservation and management pertaining to Antarctic biodiversity. biodiversity.aq provides access to both marine and terrestrial Antarctic biodiversity data.
The Genome database contains annotations and analysis of eukaryotic and prokaryotic genomes, as well as tools that allow users to compare genomes and gene sequences from humans, microbes, plants, viruses and organelles. Users can browse by organism, and view genome maps and protein clusters.
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Since the first discovery of RNA pseudoknots more and many more pseudoknots have been found. However, not all of those pseudoknot data are easy to trace. Sometimes the information is hidden in a publication where the title gives no hint that pseudoknot information is there. This was the first reason that we thought that a general accessible information source for pseudoknots would be handy.
iHUB is a collaborative environment that supports research that relate to the genes and gene networks that control the ionomes, mineral nutrient, and trace element compositions of tissues and organisms. It provides tools to share data, literature, and coordinating collection efforts, among others. It contains ionomic data on more than 200.000 samples.
The Environmental Data Initiative Repository concentrates on studies of ecological processes that play out at time scales spanning decades to centuries including those of the NSF Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) program, the NSF Macrosystems Biology Program, the NSF Long Term Research in Environmental Biology (LTREB) program, the Organization of Biological Field Stations, and others. The repository hosts data that provide a context to evaluate the nature and pace of ecological change, to interpret its effects, and to forecast the range of future biological responses to change.
The KNB Data Repository is an international repository intended to facilitate ecological, environmental and earth science research in the broadest senses. For scientists, the KNB Data Repository is an efficient way to share, discover, access and interpret complex ecological, environmental, earth science, and sociological data and the software used to create and manage those data. Due to rich contextual information provided with data in the KNB, scientists are able to integrate and analyze data with less effort. The data originate from a highly-distributed set of field stations, laboratories, research sites, and individual researchers. The KNB supports rich, detailed metadata to promote data discovery as well as automated and manual integration of data into new projects. The KNB supports a rich set of modern repository services, including the ability to assign Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) so data sets can be confidently referenced in any publication, the ability to track the versions of datasets as they evolve through time, and metadata to establish the provenance relationships between source and derived data.
PhytoPath is a new bioinformatics resource that integrates genome-scale data from important plant pathogen species with literature-curated information about the phenotypes of host infection. Using the Ensembl Genomes browser, it provides access to complete genome assembly and gene models of priority crop and model-fungal, oomycete and bacterial phytopathogens. PhytoPath also links genes to disease progression using data from the curated PHI-base resource. PhytoPath portal is a joint project bringing together Ensembl Genomes with PHI-base, a community-curated resource describing the role of genes in pathogenic infection. PhytoPath provides access to genomic and phentoypic data from fungal and oomycete plant pathogens, and has enabled a considerable increase in the coverage of phytopathogen genomes in Ensembl Fungi and Ensembl Protists. PhytoPath also provides enhanced searching of the PHI-base resource as well as the fungi and protists in Ensembl Genomes.
The Fungal Genetics Stock Center has preserved and distributed strains of genetically characterized fungi since 1960. The collection includes over 20,000 accessioned strains of classical and genetically engineered mutants of key model, human, and plant pathogenic fungi. These materials are distributed as living stocks to researchers around the world.
A database for plant breeders and researchers to combine, visualize, and interrogate the wealth of phenotype and genotype data generated by the Triticeae Coordinated Agricultural Project (TCAP).
PHI-base is a web-accessible database that catalogues experimentally verified pathogenicity, virulence and effector genes from fungal, Oomycete and bacterial pathogens, which infect animal, plant, fungal and insect hosts. PHI-base is therfore an invaluable resource in the discovery of genes in medically and agronomically important pathogens, which may be potential targets for chemical intervention. In collaboration with the FRAC team, PHI-base also includes antifungal compounds and their target genes.
PDBe is the European resource for the collection, organisation and dissemination of data on biological macromolecular structures. In collaboration with the other worldwide Protein Data Bank (wwPDB) partners - the Research Collaboratory for Structural Bioinformatics (RCSB) and BioMagResBank (BMRB) in the USA and the Protein Data Bank of Japan (PDBj) - we work to collate, maintain and provide access to the global repository of macromolecular structure data. We develop tools, services and resources to make structure-related data more accessible to the biomedical community.
The DNA Bank Network is a node of GGBN and hosts the GGBN Data Portal, Library, and Registry. The main focus of the DNA Bank Network is to enhance taxonomic, systematic, genetic, conservation and evolutionary studies by providing: • high quality, long-term storage of DNA material on which molecular studies have been performed, so that results can be verified, extended, and complemented, • complete on-line documentation of each sample, including the provenance of the original material, the place of voucher deposit, information about DNA quality and extraction methodology, digital images of vouchers and links to published molecular data if available.
Here you will find authoritative taxonomic information on plants, animals, fungi, and microbes of North America and the world.
ArrayExpress is one of the major international repositories for high-throughput functional genomics data from both microarray and high-throughput sequencing studies, many of which are supported by peer-reviewed publications. Data sets are either submitted directly to ArrayExpress and curated by a team of specialist biological curators, or are imported systematically from the NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus database on a weekly basis. Data is collected to MIAME and MINSEQE standards.