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Found 6 result(s)
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MyTardis began at Monash University to solve the problem of users needing to store large datasets and share them with collaborators online. Its particular focus is on integration with scientific instruments, instrument facilities and research lab file storage. Our belief is that the less effort a researcher has to expend safely storing data, the more likely they are to do so. This approach has flourished with MyTardis capturing data from areas such as protein crystallography, electron microscopy, medical imaging and proteomics and with deployments at Australian institutions such as University of Queensland, RMIT, University of Sydney and the Australian Synchrotron. Data access via https://mytardis.massive.org.au/ and http://vera183.its.monash.edu.au/public_data/ and see 'remarks'.
ViPR, the Virus Pathogen Resource, is a publicly available, NIAID-sponsored one-stop database and analysis resource that supports the research of viral pathogens in the NIAID Category A-C Priority Pathogen lists and those causing (re)emerging infectious diseases. ViPR integrates data from external sources (GenBank, UniProt, Immune Epitope Database, Protein Data Bank, etc.), direct submissions, and internal curation and analysis pipelines, and provides a suite of bioinformatics analysis and visualization tools to expedite virology research.
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The GISAID Initiative promotes the international sharing of all influenza virus sequences, related clinical and epidemiological data associated with human viruses, and geographical as well as species-specific data associated with avian and other animal viruses, to help researchers understand how the viruses evolve, spread and potentially become pandemics. *** GISAID does so by overcoming disincentives/hurdles or restrictions, which discourage or prevented sharing of influenza data prior to formal publication. *** The Initiative ensures that open access to data in GISAID is provided free-of-charge and to everyone, provided individuals identify themselves and agree to uphold the GISAID sharing mechanism governed through its Database Access Agreement. GISAID calls on all users to agree to the basic premise of upholding scientific etiquette, by acknowledging the originating laboratories providing the specimen and the submitting laboratories who generate the sequence data, ensuring fair exploitation of results derived from the data, and that all users agree that no restrictions shall be attached to data submitted to GISAID, to promote collaboration among researchers on the basis of open sharing of data and respect for all rights and interests.
The Electron Microscopy Data Bank (EMDB) is a public repository for electron microscopy density maps of macromolecular complexes and subcellular structures. It covers a variety of techniques, including single-particle analysis, electron tomography, and electron (2D) crystallography.
Homomint is a web available tool extending protein-protein interactions experimentally verified in models organisms, to the orthologous proteins in Homo sapiens. Similar to other approaches, the orthology groups in HomoMINT are obtained by the reciprocal best hit method as implemented in the Inparanoid algorithm.