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Found 5 result(s)
IntAct provides a freely available, open source database system and analysis tools for molecular interaction data. All interactions are derived from literature curation or direct user submissions and are freely available.
The European Nucleotide Archive (ENA) captures and presents information relating to experimental workflows that are based around nucleotide sequencing. A typical workflow includes the isolation and preparation of material for sequencing, a run of a sequencing machine in which sequencing data are produced and a subsequent bioinformatic analysis pipeline. ENA records this information in a data model that covers input information (sample, experimental setup, machine configuration), output machine data (sequence traces, reads and quality scores) and interpreted information (assembly, mapping, functional annotation). Data arrive at ENA from a variety of sources. These include submissions of raw data, assembled sequences and annotation from small-scale sequencing efforts, data provision from the major European sequencing centres and routine and comprehensive exchange with our partners in the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration (INSDC). Provision of nucleotide sequence data to ENA or its INSDC partners has become a central and mandatory step in the dissemination of research findings to the scientific community. ENA works with publishers of scientific literature and funding bodies to ensure compliance with these principles and to provide optimal submission systems and data access tools that work seamlessly with the published literature.
A database for plant breeders and researchers to combine, visualize, and interrogate the wealth of phenotype and genotype data generated by the Triticeae Coordinated Agricultural Project (TCAP).
Rhea is a freely available and comprehensive resource of expert-curated biochemical reactions. It has been designed to provide a non-redundant set of chemical transformations for applications such as the functional annotation of enzymes, pathway inference and metabolic network reconstruction. There are three types of reaction participants (reactants and products): Small molecules, Rhea polymers, Generic compounds. All three types of reaction participants are linked to the ChEBI database (Chemical Entities of Biological Interest) which provides detailed information about structure, formula and charge. Rhea provides built-in validations that ensure both mass and charge balance of the reactions. We have populated the database with the reactions found in the enzyme classification (i.e. in the IntEnz and ENZYME databases), extending it with additional known reactions of biological interest. While the main focus of Rhea is enzyme-catalysed reactions, other biochemical reactions (including those that are often termed "spontaneous") also are included.
The Open Science Framework (OSF) is part network of research materials, part version control system, and part collaboration software. The purpose of the software is to support the scientist's workflow and help increase the alignment between scientific values and scientific practices. Document and archive studies. Move the organization and management of study materials from the desktop into the cloud. Labs can organize, share, and archive study materials among team members. Web-based project management reduces the likelihood of losing study materials due to computer malfunction, changing personnel, or just forgetting where you put the damn thing. Share and find materials. With a click, make study materials public so that other researchers can find, use and cite them. Find materials by other researchers to avoid reinventing something that already exists. Detail individual contribution. Assign citable, contributor credit to any research material - tools, analysis scripts, methods, measures, data. Increase transparency. Make as much of the scientific workflow public as desired - as it is developed or after publication of reports. Find public projects here. Registration. Registering materials can certify what was done in advance of data analysis, or confirm the exact state of the project at important points of the lifecycle such as manuscript submission or at the onset of data collection. Discover public registrations here. Manage scientific workflow. A structured, flexible system can provide efficiency gain to workflow and clarity to project objectives, as pictured.