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Found 14 result(s)
The tree of life links all biodiversity through a shared evolutionary history. This project will produce the first online, comprehensive first-draft tree of all 1.8 million named species, accessible to both the public and scientific communities. Assembly of the tree will incorporate previously-published results, with strong collaborations between computational and empirical biologists to develop, test and improve methods of data synthesis. This initial tree of life will not be static; instead, we will develop tools for scientists to update and revise the tree as new data come in. Early release of the tree and tools will motivate data sharing and facilitate ongoing synthesis of knowledge.
IntAct provides a freely available, open source database system and analysis tools for molecular interaction data. All interactions are derived from literature curation or direct user submissions and are freely available.
The Bremen Core Repository - BCR, for International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP), Integrated Ocean Discovery Program (IODP), Ocean Drilling Program (ODP), and Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) cores from the Atlantic Ocean, Mediterranean and Black Seas and Arctic Ocean is operated at University of Bremen within the framework of the German participation in IODP. It is one of three IODP repositories (beside Gulf Coast Repository (GCR) in College Station, TX, and Kochi Core Center (KCC), Japan). One of the scientific goals of IODP is to research the deep biosphere and the subseafloor ocean. IODP has deep-frozen microbiological samples from the subseafloor available for interested researchers and will continue to collect and preserve geomicrobiology samples for future research.
Open access to macromolecular X-ray diffraction and MicroED datasets. The repository complements the Worldwide Protein Data Bank. SBDG also hosts reference collection of biomedical datasets contributed by members of SBGrid, Harvard and pilot communities.
Antarctic marine and terrestrial biodiversity data is widely scattered, patchy and often not readily accessible. In many cases the data is in danger of being irretrievably lost. Biodiversity.aq establishes and supports a distributed system of interoperable databases, giving easy access through a single internet portal to a set of resources relevant to research, conservation and management pertaining to Antarctic biodiversity. biodiversity.aq provides access to both marine and terrestrial Antarctic biodiversity data.
IntEnz contains the recommendation of the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology on the nomenclature and classification of enzyme-catalyzed reactions. Users can browse by enzyme classification or use advanced search options to search enzymes by class, subclass and sub-subclass information.
The KNB Data Repository is an international repository intended to facilitate ecological, environmental and earth science research in the broadest senses. For scientists, the KNB Data Repository is an efficient way to share, discover, access and interpret complex ecological, environmental, earth science, and sociological data and the software used to create and manage those data. Due to rich contextual information provided with data in the KNB, scientists are able to integrate and analyze data with less effort. The data originate from a highly-distributed set of field stations, laboratories, research sites, and individual researchers. The KNB supports rich, detailed metadata to promote data discovery as well as automated and manual integration of data into new projects. The KNB supports a rich set of modern repository services, including the ability to assign Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) so data sets can be confidently referenced in any publication, the ability to track the versions of datasets as they evolve through time, and metadata to establish the provenance relationships between source and derived data.
The European Nucleotide Archive (ENA) captures and presents information relating to experimental workflows that are based around nucleotide sequencing. A typical workflow includes the isolation and preparation of material for sequencing, a run of a sequencing machine in which sequencing data are produced and a subsequent bioinformatic analysis pipeline. ENA records this information in a data model that covers input information (sample, experimental setup, machine configuration), output machine data (sequence traces, reads and quality scores) and interpreted information (assembly, mapping, functional annotation). Data arrive at ENA from a variety of sources. These include submissions of raw data, assembled sequences and annotation from small-scale sequencing efforts, data provision from the major European sequencing centres and routine and comprehensive exchange with our partners in the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration (INSDC). Provision of nucleotide sequence data to ENA or its INSDC partners has become a central and mandatory step in the dissemination of research findings to the scientific community. ENA works with publishers of scientific literature and funding bodies to ensure compliance with these principles and to provide optimal submission systems and data access tools that work seamlessly with the published literature.
The Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC) is a coalition of investigators seeking to aggregate and harmonize exome sequencing data from a wide variety of large-scale sequencing projects, and to make summary data available for the wider scientific community. The data set provided on this website spans 60,706 unrelated individuals sequenced as part of various disease-specific and population genetic studies.
The Africa Centre offers longitudinal datasets from a rural demographic in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa where HIV prevalence is extremely high. The data may be filtered by demographics, years, or by individuals questionnaires. The Africa Centre requests notification that anyone contact them when downloading their data. Since January 2000, the Africa Centre For Population Health has built up an extensive longitudinal database of demographic, social, medical and economic information about the members of its Demographic Surveillance Area, which is situated in a rural area of northern KwaZulu-Natal. It has developed from this database, the following suite of datasets which can be used both internally within the organisation, and by other researchers.
Homomint is a web available tool extending protein-protein interactions experimentally verified in models organisms, to the orthologous proteins in Homo sapiens. Similar to other approaches, the orthology groups in HomoMINT are obtained by the reciprocal best hit method as implemented in the Inparanoid algorithm.
PDBe is the European resource for the collection, organisation and dissemination of data on biological macromolecular structures. In collaboration with the other worldwide Protein Data Bank (wwPDB) partners - the Research Collaboratory for Structural Bioinformatics (RCSB) and BioMagResBank (BMRB) in the USA and the Protein Data Bank of Japan (PDBj) - we work to collate, maintain and provide access to the global repository of macromolecular structure data. We develop tools, services and resources to make structure-related data more accessible to the biomedical community.
InnateDB is a publicly available database of the genes, proteins, experimentally-verified interactions and signaling pathways involved in the innate immune response of humans, mice and bovines to microbial infection. The database captures an improved coverage of the innate immunity interactome by integrating known interactions and pathways from major public databases together with manually-curated data into a centralised resource. The database can be mined as a knowledgebase or used with our integrated bioinformatics and visualization tools for the systems level analysis of the innate immune response.