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Found 87 result(s)
The Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative Information and Data Cooperative (GRIIDC) is a team of researchers, data specialists and computer system developers who are supporting the development of a data management system to store scientific data generated by Gulf of Mexico researchers. The Master Research Agreement between BP and the Gulf of Mexico Alliance that established the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (GoMRI) included provisions that all data collected or generated through the agreement must be made available to the public. The Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative Information and Data Cooperative (GRIIDC) is the vehicle through which GoMRI is fulfilling this requirement. The mission of GRIIDC is to ensure a data and information legacy that promotes continual scientific discovery and public awareness of the Gulf of Mexico Ecosystem.
The PLANKTON*NET data provider at the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research is an open access repository for plankton-related information. It covers all types of phytoplankton and zooplankton from marine and freshwater areas. PLANKTON*NET's greatest strength is its comprehensiveness as for the different taxa image information as well as taxonomic descriptions can be archived. PLANKTON*NET also contains a glossary with accompanying images to illustrate the term definitions. PLANKTON*NET therefore presents a vital tool for the preservation of historic data sets as well as the archival of current research results. Because interoperability with international biodiversity data providers (e.g. GBIF) is one of our aims, the architecture behind the new planktonnet@awi repository is observation centric and allows for mulitple assignment of assets (images, references, animations, etc) to any given observation. In addition, images can be grouped in sets and/or assigned tags to satisfy user-specific needs . Sets (and respective images) of relevance to the scientific community and/or general public have been assigned a persistant digital object identifier (DOI) for the purpose of long-term preservation (e.g. set ""Plankton*Net celebrates 50 years of Roman Treaties"", handle: 10013/de.awi.planktonnet.set.495)"
The tree of life links all biodiversity through a shared evolutionary history. This project will produce the first online, comprehensive first-draft tree of all 1.8 million named species, accessible to both the public and scientific communities. Assembly of the tree will incorporate previously-published results, with strong collaborations between computational and empirical biologists to develop, test and improve methods of data synthesis. This initial tree of life will not be static; instead, we will develop tools for scientists to update and revise the tree as new data come in. Early release of the tree and tools will motivate data sharing and facilitate ongoing synthesis of knowledge.
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Silkworm Pathogen Database (SilkPathDB) is a comprehensive resource for studying on pathogens of silkworm, including microsporidia, fungi, bacteria and virus. SilkPathDB provides access to not only genomic data including functional annotation of genes and gene products, but also extensive biological information for gene expression data and corresponding researches. SilkPathDB will be help with researches on pathogens of silkworm as well as other Lepidoptera insects.
caNanoLab is a data sharing portal designed to facilitate information sharing in the biomedical nanotechnology research community to expedite and validate the use of nanotechnology in biomedicine. caNanoLab provides support for the annotation of nanomaterials with characterizations resulting from physico-chemical and in vitro assays and the sharing of these characterizations and associated nanotechnology protocols in a secure fashion.
The IMEx consortium is an international collaboration between a group of major public interaction data providers who have agreed to share curation effort and develop and work to a single set of curation rules when capturing data from both directly deposited interaction data or from publications in peer-reviewed journals, capture full details of an interaction in a “deep” curation model, perform a complete curation of all protein-protein interactions experimentally demonstrated within a publication, make these interaction available in a single search interface on a common website, provide the data in standards compliant download formats, make all IMEx records freely accessible under the Creative Commons Attribution License
IntAct provides a freely available, open source database system and analysis tools for molecular interaction data. All interactions are derived from literature curation or direct user submissions and are freely available.
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CBS offers Comprehensive public databases of DNA- and protein sequences, macromolecular structure, g ene and protein expression levels, pathway organization and cell signalling, have been established to optimise scientific exploitation of the explosion of data within biology. Unlike many other groups in the field of biomolecular informatics, Center for Biological Sequence Analysis directs its research primarily towards topics related to the elucidation of the functional aspects of complex biological mechanisms. Among contemporary bioinformatics concerns are reliable computational interpretation of a wide range of experimental data, and the detailed understanding of the molecular apparatus behind cellular mechanisms of sequence information. By exploiting available experimental data and evidence in the design of algorithms, sequence correlations and other features of biological significance can be inferred. In addition to the computational research the center also has experimental efforts in gene expression analysis using DNA chips and data generation in relation to the physical and structural properties of DNA. In the last decade, the Center for Biological Sequence Analysis has produced a large number of computational methods, which are offered to others via WWW servers.
The Gene database provides detailed information for known and predicted genes defined by nucleotide sequence or map position. Gene supplies gene-specific connections in the nexus of map, sequence, expression, structure, function, citation, and homology data. Unique identifiers are assigned to genes with defining sequences, genes with known map positions, and genes inferred from phenotypic information. These gene identifiers are used throughout NCBI's databases and tracked through updates of annotation. Gene includes genomes represented by NCBI Reference Sequences (or RefSeqs) and is integrated for indexing and query and retrieval from NCBI's Entrez and E-Utilities systems.
EMPIAR, the Electron Microscopy Public Image Archive, is a public resource for raw, 2D electron microscopy images. Here, you can browse, upload, download and reprocess the thousands of raw, 2D images used to build a 3D structure. The purpose of EMPIAR is to provide an easy access to the state-of-the-art raw data to facilitate methods development and validation, which will lead to better 3D structures. It complements the Electron Microscopy Data Bank (EMDB), where 3D images are stored, and uses the fault-tolerant Aspera platform for data transfers
Project Tycho® is a project at the University of Pittsburgh to advance the availability and use of public health data for science and policy making. Currently, the Project Tycho® database includes data from all weekly notifiable disease reports for the United States dating back to 1888. These data are freely available to anybody interested. Additional U.S. and international data will be released twice yearly.
The UC San Diego Library Digital Collections website gathers two categories of content managed by the Library: library collections (including digitized versions of selected collections covering topics such as art, film, music, history and anthropology) and research data collections (including research data generated by UC San Diego researchers).
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Morph·D·Base has been developed to serve scientific research and education. It provides a platform for storing the detailed documentation of all material, methods, procedures, and concepts applied, together with the specific parameters, values, techniques, and instruments used during morphological data production. In other words, it's purpose is to provide a publicly available resource for recording and documenting morphological metadata. Moreover, it is also a repository for different types of media files that can be uploaded in order to serve as support and empirical substantiation of the results of morphological investigations. Our long-term perspective with Morph·D·Base is to provide an instrument that will enable a highly formalized and standardized way of generating morphological descriptions using a morphological ontology that will be based on the web ontology language (OWL - http://www.w3.org/TR/owl-features/). This, however, represents a project that is still in development.
MycoCosm, the DOE JGI’s web-based fungal genomics resource, which integrates fungal genomics data and analytical tools for fungal biologists. It provides navigation through sequenced genomes, genome analysis in context of comparative genomics and genome-centric view. MycoCosm promotes user community participation in data submission, annotation and analysis.
The Bremen Core Repository - BCR, for International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP), Integrated Ocean Discovery Program (IODP), Ocean Drilling Program (ODP), and Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) cores from the Atlantic Ocean, Mediterranean and Black Seas and Arctic Ocean is operated at University of Bremen within the framework of the German participation in IODP. It is one of three IODP repositories (beside Gulf Coast Repository (GCR) in College Station, TX, and Kochi Core Center (KCC), Japan). One of the scientific goals of IODP is to research the deep biosphere and the subseafloor ocean. IODP has deep-frozen microbiological samples from the subseafloor available for interested researchers and will continue to collect and preserve geomicrobiology samples for future research.
BiGG is a knowledgebase of Biochemically, Genetically and Genomically structured genome-scale metabolic network reconstructions. BiGG integrates several published genome-scale metabolic networks into one resource with standard nomenclature which allows components to be compared across different organisms. BiGG can be used to browse model content, visualize metabolic pathway maps, and export SBML files of the models for further analysis by external software packages. Users may follow links from BiGG to several external databases to obtain additional information on genes, proteins, reactions, metabolites and citations of interest.
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Research Data Online (RDO) provides access to research datasets held at the University of Western Australia. RDO is managed by the University Library. The information about each dataset has been provided by UWA research groups. Information about the datasets in this service is automatically harvested into Research Data Australia (RDA: https://researchdata.ands.org.au/). Language: The user interface language of the research data repository.
Antarctic marine and terrestrial biodiversity data is widely scattered, patchy and often not readily accessible. In many cases the data is in danger of being irretrievably lost. Biodiversity.aq establishes and supports a distributed system of interoperable databases, giving easy access through a single internet portal to a set of resources relevant to research, conservation and management pertaining to Antarctic biodiversity. biodiversity.aq provides access to both marine and terrestrial Antarctic biodiversity data.
This Web resource provides data and information relevant to SARS coronavirus. It includes links to the most recent sequence data and publications, to other SARS related resources, and a pre-computed alignment of genome sequences from various isolates. The genome of SARS-CoV consists of a single, positive-strand RNA that is approximately 29,700 nucleotides long. The overall genome organization of SARS-CoV is similar to that of other coronaviruses. The reference genome includes 13 genes, which encode at least 14 proteins. Two large overlapping reading frames (ORFs) encompass 71% of the genome. The remainder has 12 potential ORFs, including genes for structural proteins S (spike), E (small envelope), M (membrane), and N (nucleocapsid). Other potential ORFs code for unique putative SARS-CoV-specific polypeptides that lack obvious sequence similarity to known proteins.
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MyTardis began at Monash University to solve the problem of users needing to store large datasets and share them with collaborators online. Its particular focus is on integration with scientific instruments, instrument facilities and research lab file storage. Our belief is that the less effort a researcher has to expend safely storing data, the more likely they are to do so. This approach has flourished with MyTardis capturing data from areas such as protein crystallography, electron microscopy, medical imaging and proteomics and with deployments at Australian institutions such as University of Queensland, RMIT, University of Sydney and the Australian Synchrotron. Data access via https://mytardis.massive.org.au/ and http://vera183.its.monash.edu.au/public_data/ and see 'remarks'.