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Found 11 result(s)
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CPLM (Compendium of Protein Lysine Modifications) is an online data resource specifically designed for protein lysine modifications (PLMs). The CPLM database was extended and adapted from our CPLA 1.0 (Compendium of Protein Lysine Acetylation) database and the 2.0 release contains 203,972 modification events on 189,919 modified lysines in 45,748 proteins for 12 types of PLMs, including Nε-lysine acetylation, ubiquitination, methylation, sumoylation, glycation, butyrylation, crotonylation, malonylation, propionylation, succinylation, phosphoglycerylation and prokaryotic Pupylation.
This site offers an enormous collection of photographs of wild species and natural history objects. It covers most groups of organisms with the exception of birds and other vertebrates. The photographs are presented to illustrate biodiversity and as an aid to identification. The criterion for inclusion of a species is that it must have been, or might be expected to be, found in Britain or Ireland. BioImages follows the biological classification. This is a hierarchical system with species grouped in genera, genera in families, families in orders and so on up to kingdoms and superkingdoms. Biota takes you to the top of the classification tree.
This library is a public and easily accessible resource database of images, videos, and animations of cells, capturing a wide diversity of organisms, cell types, and cellular processes. The purpose of this database is to advance research on cellular activity, with the ultimate goal of improving human health.
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We developed a method, ChIP-sequencing (ChIP-seq), combining chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and massively parallel sequencing to identify mammalian DNA sequences bound by transcription factors in vivo. We used ChIP-seq to map STAT1 targets in interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma)-stimulated and unstimulated human HeLa S3 cells, and compared the method's performance to ChIP-PCR and to ChIP-chip for four chromosomes.For both Chromatin- immunoprecipation Transcription Factors and Histone modifications. Sequence files and the associated probability files are also provided.
CODEX is a database of NGS mouse and human experiments. Although, the main focus of CODEX is Haematopoiesis and Embryonic systems, the database includes a large variety of cell types. In addition to the publically available data, CODEX also includes a private site hosting non-published data. CODEX provides access to processed and curated NGS experiments. To use CODEX: (i) select a specialized repository (HAEMCODE or ESCODE) or choose the whole compendium (CODEX), then (ii) filter by organism and (iii) choose how to explore the database.
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During cell cycle, numerous proteins temporally and spatially localized in distinct sub-cellular regions including centrosome (spindle pole in budding yeast), kinetochore/centromere, cleavage furrow/midbody (related or homolog structures in plants and budding yeast called as phragmoplast and bud neck, respectively), telomere and spindle spatially and temporally. These sub-cellular regions play important roles in various biological processes. In this work, we have collected all proteins identified to be localized on kinetochore, centrosome, midbody, telomere and spindle from two fungi (S. cerevisiae and S. pombe) and five animals, including C. elegans, D. melanogaster, X. laevis, M. musculus and H. sapiens based on the rationale of "Seeing is believing" (Bloom K et al., 2005). Through ortholog searches, the proteins potentially localized at these sub-cellular regions were detected in 144 eukaryotes. Then the integrated and searchable database MiCroKiTS - Midbody, Centrosome, Kinetochore, Telomere and Spindle has been established.
The Intermediate Filament Database will function as a continuously updated review of the intermediate filament field and it is hoped that users will contribute to the development and expansion of the database on a regular basis. Contributions may include novel variants, new patients with previously discovered sequence and allelic variants. Suggestions on ways to improve the database are also welcome.
The EZRC at KIT houses the largest experimental fish facility in Europe with a capacity of more than 300,000 fish. Zebrafish stocks are maintained mostly as frozen sperm. Frequently requested lines are also kept alive as well as a selection of wildtype strains. Several thousand mutations in protein coding genes generated by TILLING in the Stemple lab of the Sanger Centre, Hinxton, UK and lines generated by ENU mutagenesis by the Nüsslein-Volhard lab in addition to transgenic lines and mutants generated by KIT groups or brought in through collaborations. We also accept submissions on an individual basis and ship fish upon request to PIs in Europe and elsewhere. EZRC also provides screening services and technologies such as imaging and high-throughput sequencing. Key areas include automation of embryo handling and automated image acquisition and processing. Our platform also involves the development of novel microscopy techniques (e.g. SPIM, DSLM, robotic macroscope) to permit high-resolution, real-time imaging in 4D. By association with the ComPlat platform, we can support also chemical screens and offer libraries with up to 20,000 compounds in total for external users. As another service to the community the EZRC provides plasmids (cDNAs, transgenes, Talen, Crispr/cas9) maintained by the Helmholtz repository of Bioparts (HERBI) to the scientific community. In addition the fish facility keeps a range of medaka stocks, maintained by the Loosli group.
!!!Sprry.we are no longer in operation!!! The Beta Cell Biology Consortium (BCBC) was a team science initiative that was established by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK). It was initially funded in 2001 (RFA DK-01-014), and competitively continued both in 2005 (RFAs DK-01-17, DK-01-18) and in 2009 (RFA DK-09-011). Funding for the BCBC came to an end on August 1, 2015, and with it so did our ability to maintain active websites.!!! One of the many goals of the BCBC was to develop and maintain databases of useful research resources. A total of 813 different scientific resources were generated and submitted by BCBC investigators over the 14 years it existed. Information pertaining to 495 selected resources, judged to be the most scientifically-useful, has been converted into a static catalog, as shown below. In addition, the metadata for these 495 resources have been transferred to dkNET in the form of RDF descriptors, and all genomics data have been deposited to either ArrayExpress or GEO. Please direct questions or comments to the NIDDK Division of Diabetes, Endocrinology & Metabolic Diseases (DEM).