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Found 11 result(s)
Online Mendelian Inheritance in Animals (OMIA) is a catalogue/compendium of inherited disorders, other (single-locus) traits, and genes in 218 animal species (other than human and mouse and rats, which have their own resources) authored by Professor Frank Nicholas of the University of Sydney, Australia, with help from many people over the years. OMIA information is stored in a database that contains textual information and references, as well as links to relevant PubMed and Gene records at the NCBI, and to OMIM and Ensembl.
dbEST is a division of GenBank that contains sequence data and other information on "single-pass" cDNA sequences, or "Expressed Sequence Tags", from a number of organisms. Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) are short (usually about 300-500 bp), single-pass sequence reads from mRNA (cDNA). Typically they are produced in large batches. They represent a snapshot of genes expressed in a given tissue and/or at a given developmental stage. They are tags (some coding, others not) of expression for a given cDNA library. Most EST projects develop large numbers of sequences. These are commonly submitted to GenBank and dbEST as batches of dozens to thousands of entries, with a great deal of redundancy in the citation, submitter and library information. To improve the efficiency of the submission process for this type of data, we have designed a special streamlined submission process and data format. dbEST also includes sequences that are longer than the traditional ESTs, or are produced as single sequences or in small batches. Among these sequences are products of differential display experiments and RACE experiments. The thing that these sequences have in common with traditional ESTs, regardless of length, quality, or quantity, is that there is little information that can be annotated in the record. If a sequence is later characterized and annotated with biological features such as a coding region, 5'UTR, or 3'UTR, it should be submitted through the regular GenBank submissions procedure (via BankIt or Sequin), even if part of the sequence is already in dbEST. dbEST is reserved for single-pass reads. Assembled sequences should not be submitted to dbEST. GenBank will accept assembled EST submissions for the forthcoming TSA (Transcriptome Shotgun Assembly) division. The individual reads which make up the assembly should be submitted to dbEST, the Trace archive or the Short Read Archive (SRA) prior to the submission of the assemblies.
The Gene database provides detailed information for known and predicted genes defined by nucleotide sequence or map position. Gene supplies gene-specific connections in the nexus of map, sequence, expression, structure, function, citation, and homology data. Unique identifiers are assigned to genes with defining sequences, genes with known map positions, and genes inferred from phenotypic information. These gene identifiers are used throughout NCBI's databases and tracked through updates of annotation. Gene includes genomes represented by NCBI Reference Sequences (or RefSeqs) and is integrated for indexing and query and retrieval from NCBI's Entrez and E-Utilities systems.
The Brain Transcriptome Database (BrainTx) project aims to create an integrated platform to visualize and analyze our original transcriptome data and publicly accessible transcriptome data related to the genetics that underlie the development, function, and dysfunction stages and states of the brain.
This library is a public and easily accessible resource database of images, videos, and animations of cells, capturing a wide diversity of organisms, cell types, and cellular processes. The purpose of this database is to advance research on cellular activity, with the ultimate goal of improving human health.
UniGene collects entries of transcript sequences from transcription loci from genes or expressed pseudogenes. Entries also contain information on the protein similarities, gene expressions, cDNA clone reagents, and genomic locations.
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GSA is a data repository specialized for archiving raw sequence reads. It supports data generated from a variety of sequencing platforms ranging from Sanger sequencing machines to single-cell sequencing machines and provides data storing and sharing services free of charge for worldwide scientific communities. In addition to raw sequencing data, GSA also accommodates secondary analyzed files in acceptable formats (like BAM, VCF). Its user-friendly web interfaces simplify data entry and submitted data are roughly organized as two parts, viz., Metadata and File, where the former can be further assorted into BioProject, BioSample, Experiment and Run, and the latter contains raw sequence reads.
The Sequence Read Archive stores the raw sequencing data from such sequencing platforms as the Roche 454 GS System, the Illumina Genome Analyzer, the Applied Biosystems SOLiD System, the Helicos Heliscope, and the Complete Genomics. It archives the sequencing data associated with RNA-Seq, ChIP-Seq, Genomic and Transcriptomic assemblies, and 16S ribosomal RNA data.
The Protein database is a collection of sequences from several sources, including translations from annotated coding regions in GenBank, RefSeq and TPA, as well as records from SwissProt, PIR, PRF, and PDB. Protein sequences are the fundamental determinants of biological structure and function.
The Ensembl project produces genome databases for vertebrates and other eukaryotic species. Ensembl is a joint project between the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute (WTSI) to develop a software system that produces and maintains automatic annotation on selected genomes.The Ensembl project was started in 1999, some years before the draft human genome was completed. Even at that early stage it was clear that manual annotation of 3 billion base pairs of sequence would not be able to offer researchers timely access to the latest data. The goal of Ensembl was therefore to automatically annotate the genome, integrate this annotation with other available biological data and make all this publicly available via the web. Since the website's launch in July 2000, many more genomes have been added to Ensembl and the range of available data has also expanded to include comparative genomics, variation and regulatory data. Ensembl is a joint project between European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI), an outstation of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute (WTSI). Both institutes are located on the Wellcome Trust Genome Campus in Hinxton, south of the city of Cambridge, United Kingdom.