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Found 27 result(s)
The IMSR is a searchable online database of mouse strains, stocks, and mutant ES cell lines available worldwide, including inbred, mutant, and genetically engineered strains. The goal of the IMSR is to assist the international scientific community in locating and obtaining mouse resources for research. Note that the data content found in the IMSR is as supplied by strain repository holders. For each strain or cell line listed in the IMSR, users can obtain information about: Where that resource is available (Repository Site); What state(s) the resource is available as (e.g. live, cryopreserved embryo or germplasm, ES cells); Links to descriptive information about a strain or ES cell line; Links to mutant alleles carried by a strain or ES cell line; Links for ordering a strain or ES cell line from a Repository; Links for contacting the Repository to send a query
The Expression Atlas provides information on gene expression patterns under different biological conditions such as a gene knock out, a plant treated with a compound, or in a particular organism part or cell. It includes both microarray and RNA-seq data. The data is re-analysed in-house to detect interesting expression patterns under the conditions of the original experiment. There are two components to the Expression Atlas, the Baseline Atlas and the Differential Atlas. The Baseline Atlas displays information about which gene products are present (and at what abundance) in "normal" conditions (e.g. tissue, cell type). It aims to answer questions such as "which genes are specifically expressed in human kidney?". This component of the Expression Atlas consists of highly-curated and quality-checked RNA-seq experiments from ArrayExpress. It has data for many different animal and plant species. New experiments are added as they become available. The Differential Atlas allows users to identify genes that are up- or down-regulated in a wide variety of different experimental conditions such as yeast mutants, cadmium treated plants, cystic fibrosis or the effect on gene expression of mind-body practice. Both microarray and RNA-seq experiments are included in the Differential Atlas. Experiments are selected from ArrayExpress and groups of samples are manually identified for comparison e.g. those with wild type genotype compared to those with a gene knock out. Each experiment is processed through our in-house differential expression statistical analysis pipeline to identify genes with a high probability of differential expression.
This Animal Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) database (Animal QTLdb) is designed to house all publicly available QTL and trait mapping data (i.e. trait and genome location association data; collectively called "QTL data" on this site) on livestock animal species for easily locating and making comparisons within and between species. New database tools are continuely added to align the QTL and association data to other types of genome information, such as annotated genes, RH / SNP markers, and human genome maps. Besides the QTL data from species listed below, the QTLdb is open to house QTL/association date from other animal species where feasible. Note that the JAS along with other journals, now require that new QTL/association data be entered into a QTL database as part of their publication requirements.
MGI is the international database resource for the laboratory mouse, providing integrated genetic, genomic, and biological data to facilitate the study of human health and disease. The projects contributing to this resource are: Mouse Genome Database (MGD) Project, Gene Expression Database (GXD) Project, Mouse Tumor Biology (MTB) Database Project, Gene Ontology (GO) Project at MGI, MouseMine Project, MouseCyc Project at MGI
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Using serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) and microarrays, we are examining total mRNA populations in all developmental stages, both in whole worms and in specific cells and tissues. In addition, we are building promoter::GFP constructs to monitor gene expression in transgenic worms, focusing on C. elegans genes that have human orthologues. Also available are web-based PCR primer design tools, and access to information about our C. elegans Fosmid library.
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CPLM (Compendium of Protein Lysine Modifications) is an online data resource specifically designed for protein lysine modifications (PLMs). The CPLM database was extended and adapted from our CPLA 1.0 (Compendium of Protein Lysine Acetylation) database and the 2.0 release contains 203,972 modification events on 189,919 modified lysines in 45,748 proteins for 12 types of PLMs, including Nε-lysine acetylation, ubiquitination, methylation, sumoylation, glycation, butyrylation, crotonylation, malonylation, propionylation, succinylation, phosphoglycerylation and prokaryotic Pupylation.
Probe database provides a public registry of nucleic acid reagents as well as information on reagent distributors, sequence similarities and probe effectiveness. Database users have access to applications of gene expression, gene silencing and mapping, as well as reagent variation analysis and projects based on probe-generated data. The Probe database is constantly updated.
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We developed a method, ChIP-sequencing (ChIP-seq), combining chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and massively parallel sequencing to identify mammalian DNA sequences bound by transcription factors in vivo. We used ChIP-seq to map STAT1 targets in interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma)-stimulated and unstimulated human HeLa S3 cells, and compared the method's performance to ChIP-PCR and to ChIP-chip for four chromosomes.For both Chromatin- immunoprecipation Transcription Factors and Histone modifications. Sequence files and the associated probability files are also provided.
The goals of the Drosophila Genome Center are to finish the sequence of the euchromatic genome of Drosophila melanogaster to high quality and to generate and maintain biological annotations of this sequence. In addition to genomic sequencing, the BDGP is 1) producing gene disruptions using P element-mediated mutagenesis on a scale unprecedented in metazoans; 2) characterizing the sequence and expression of cDNAs; and 3) developing informatics tools that support the experimental process, identify features of DNA sequence, and allow us to present up-to-date information about the annotated sequence to the research community.
Xenbase's mission is to provide the international research community with a comprehensive, integrated and easy to use web based resource that gives access the diverse and rich genomic, expression and functional data available from Xenopus research. Xenbase also provides a critical data sharing infrastructure for many other NIH-funded projects, and is a focal point for the Xenopus community. In addition to our primary goal of supporting Xenopus researchers, Xenbase enhances the availability and visibility of Xenopus data to the broader biomedical research community.
The NCI’s Cancer Genome Anatomy Project (CGAP) is an online resource designed to provide the scientific community with detailed characterization of gene expression in biological tissues. By characterizing normal, pre-cancer and cancer cells, CGAP aims to improve detection, diagnosis and treatment for the patient. Moreover, CGAP provides access to cDNA clones to the research community through a variety of distributors. CGAP provides a wide range of genomic data and resources
The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute is a charitably funded genomic research centre located in Hinxton, nine miles south of Cambridge in the UK. We study diseases that have an impact on health globally by investigating genomes. Building on our past achievements and based on priorities that exploit the unique expertise of our Faculty of researchers, we will lead global efforts to understand the biology of genomes. We are convinced of the importance of making this research available and accessible for all audiences. reduce global health burdens.
In early 2010 we updated the site to facilitate more rapid transfer of our data to the public database and focus our efforts on the core mission of providing expression pattern images to the research community. The original database http://www.fruitfly.org/index.html reproduced functions available on FlyBase, complicating our updates by the requirement to re-synchronize with FlyBase updates. Our expression reports on the new site still link to FlyBase gene reports, but we no longer reproduce FlyBase functions and therefore can update expression data on an ongoing basis instead of more infrequent major releases. All the functions relating to the expression patterns remain and we soon will add an option to search expression patterns by image similarity, in addition to annotation term searches. In a transitional phase we will leave both the old and the new sites up, but the newer data (post Release 2) will appear only on the new website. We welcome any feedback or requests for additional features. - The goals of the Drosophila Genome Center are to finish the sequence of the euchromatic genome of Drosophila melanogaster to high quality and to generate and maintain biological annotations of this sequence. In addition to genomic sequencing, the BDGP is 1) producing gene disruptions using P element-mediated mutagenesis on a scale unprecedented in metazoans; 2) characterizing the sequence and expression of cDNAs; and 3) developing informatics tools that support the experimental process, identify features of DNA sequence, and allow us to present up-to-date information about the annotated sequence to the research community.
UniGene collects entries of transcript sequences from transcription loci from genes or expressed pseudogenes. Entries also contain information on the protein similarities, gene expressions, cDNA clone reagents, and genomic locations.
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The Centre for Applied Genomics hosts a variety of databases related to ongoing supported projects. Curation of these databases is performed in-house by TCAG Bioinformatics staff. The Autism Chromosome Rearrangement Database, The Cystic Fibrosis Mutation Database, TThe Lafora Progressive Myoclonus Epilepsy Mutation and Polymorphism Database are included. Large Scale Genomics Research resources include, the Database of Genomic Variants, The Chromosome 7 Annotation Project, The Human Genome Segmental Duplication Database, and the Non-Human Segmental Duplication Database
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GSA is a data repository specialized for archiving raw sequence reads. It supports data generated from a variety of sequencing platforms ranging from Sanger sequencing machines to single-cell sequencing machines and provides data storing and sharing services free of charge for worldwide scientific communities. In addition to raw sequencing data, GSA also accommodates secondary analyzed files in acceptable formats (like BAM, VCF). Its user-friendly web interfaces simplify data entry and submitted data are roughly organized as two parts, viz., Metadata and File, where the former can be further assorted into BioProject, BioSample, Experiment and Run, and the latter contains raw sequence reads.
The Human Ageing Genomic Resources (HAGR) is a collection of databases and tools designed to help researchers study the genetics of human ageing using modern approaches such as functional genomics, network analyses, systems biology and evolutionary analyses.
GermOnline 4.0 is a cross-species database gateway focusing on high-throughput expression data relevant for germline development, the meiotic cell cycle and mitosis in healthy versus malignant cells. The portal provides access to the Saccharomyces Genomics Viewer (SGV) which facilitates online interpretation of complex data from experiments with high-density oligonucleotide tiling microarrays that cover the entire yeast genome.
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The Mouse Atlas of Gene Expression is a quantitative and comprehensive atlas of gene expression in mouse development. Gene expression levels from 198 tissue samples was measured using 202 Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE). Emphasis was on mouse development, samples taken at different stages of mouse development.
The Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) provides DNA barcode data. BOLD's online workbench supports data validation, annotation, and publication for specimen, distributional, and molecular data. The platform consists of four main modules: a data portal, a database of barcode clusters, an educational portal, and a data collection workbench. BOLD is the go-to site for DNA-based identification. As the central informatics platform for DNA barcoding, BOLD plays a crucial role in assimilating and organizing data gathered by the international barcode research community. Two iBOL (International Barcode of Life) Working Groups are supporting the ongoing development of BOLD.
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KEGG is a database resource for understanding high-level functions and utilities of the biological system, such as the cell, the organism and the ecosystem, from molecular-level information, especially large-scale molecular datasets generated by genome sequencing and other high-throughput experimental technologies
It is an interactive website offering access to genome sequence data from a variety of vertebrate and invertebrate species and major model organisms, integrated with a large collection of aligned annotations. The Browser is a graphical viewer optimized to support fast interactive performance and is an open-source, web-based tool suite built on top of a MySQL database for rapid visualization, examination, and querying of the data at many levels.
The NCBI Taxonomy database is a curated set of names and classifications for all of the organisms that are represented in GenBank. The EMBL and DDBJ databases, as well as GenBank, now use the NCBI Taxonomy as the standard classification for nucleotide sequences. Taxonomy Contains the names and phylogenetic lineages of more than 160,000 organisms that have molecular data in the NCBI databases. New taxa are added to the Taxonomy database as data are deposited for them. When new sequences are submitted to GenBank, the submission is checked for new organism names, which are then classified and added to the Taxonomy database.