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Found 19 result(s)
Intrepid Bioinformatics serves as a community for genetic researchers and scientific programmers who need to achieve meaningful use of their genetic research data – but can’t spend tremendous amounts of time or money in the process. The Intrepid Bioinformatics system automates time consuming manual processes, shortens workflow, and eliminates the threat of lost data in a faster, cheaper, and better environment than existing solutions. The system also provides the functionality and community features needed to analyze the large volumes of Next Generation Sequencing and Single Nucleotide Polymorphism data, which is generated for a wide range of purposes from disease tracking and animal breeding to medical diagnosis and treatment.
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The Institute of Ocean Sciences (IOS)/Ocean Sciences Division (OSD) data archive contains the holdings of oceanographic data generated by the IOS and other agencies and laboratories, including the Institute of Oceanography at the University of British Columbia and the Pacific Biological Station. The contents include data from B.C. coastal waters and inlets, B.C. continental shelf waters, open ocean North Pacific waters, Beaufort Sea and the Arctic Archipelago.
State of the Salmon provides data on abundance, diversity, and ecosystem health of wild salmon populations specific to the Pacific Ocean, North Western North America, and Asia. Data downloads are available using two geographic frameworks: Salmon Ecoregions or Hydro 1K.
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The Atlantic Canada Conservation Data Centre (ACCDC) maintains comprehensive lists of plant and animal species. The Atlantic CDC has geo-located records of species occurrences and records of extremely rare to uncommon species in the Atlantic region, including New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, Newfoundland, and Labrador. The Atlantic CDC also maintains biological and other types of data in a variety of linked databases.
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The Australian SuperSite Network Data Portal presents data on vegetation, fauna, soil, water, daily meteorology and daily recorded soundscapes from 10 SuperSites across a diverse range of biomes, including tropical rainforest, grassland and savanna; wet and dry sclerophyll forest and woodland; and semi-arid grassland, woodland and savanna.
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Open Research Data provides quality assessed data and their metadata such as context information on measurement objectives, equipment, methods, testing and investigation areas. The purpose of the repository is to secure quality, integrity and long-term availability of landscape and ecosystem research data as well as to enhance accessibility of free data from ZALF long-term monitoring campaigns, landscape laboratories (Agro-ScapeLabs), field trials and experiments. The Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF) explores ecosystems in agricultural landscapes and the development of ecologically and economically viable land use systems. ZALF combines scientific expertise from agricultural science, geosciences, biosciences and socio-economics.
The KNB Data Repository is an international repository intended to facilitate ecological, environmental and earth science research in the broadest senses. For scientists, the KNB Data Repository is an efficient way to share, discover, access and interpret complex ecological, environmental, earth science, and sociological data and the software used to create and manage those data. Due to rich contextual information provided with data in the KNB, scientists are able to integrate and analyze data with less effort. The data originate from a highly-distributed set of field stations, laboratories, research sites, and individual researchers. The KNB supports rich, detailed metadata to promote data discovery as well as automated and manual integration of data into new projects. The KNB supports a rich set of modern repository services, including the ability to assign Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) so data sets can be confidently referenced in any publication, the ability to track the versions of datasets as they evolve through time, and metadata to establish the provenance relationships between source and derived data.
The USGS Alaska Region has the largest geographic extent of the seven regional units within the USGS and represents a dynamic landscape of great natural wonder. It is a transforming landscape shaped by volcanoes, earthquakes, major rivers, and glaciers and a strategic landscape of yet untapped mineral and energy resources. The Region conducts research to help inform management of the extensive national parks and wildlife refuges of the far north and the international birds, fish, and marine mammals that migrate to these lands and waters; informs national Arctic energy policy through research on the National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska and the U.S. Outer Continental Shelf; and provides science to understand, help respond to and mitigate impacts from natural hazards. This work is accomplished in part by the Region's two Science Centers headquartered in Anchorage, the Alaska Science Center and the Volcano Science Center.
The Andrews Forest is a place of inquiry. Our mission is to support research on forests, streams, and watersheds, and to foster strong collaboration among ecosystem science, education, natural resource management, and the humanities. Our place and our work are administered cooperatively by the USDA Forest Service's Pacific Northwest Research Station, Oregon State University, and the Willamette National Forest. First established in 1948 as an US Forest Service Experimental Forest, the H.J. Andrews is a 16,000-acre ecological research site in Oregon's beautiful western Cascades Mountains. The landscape is home to iconic Pacific Northwest old-growth forests of Cedar and Hemlock, and moss-draped ancient Douglas Firs; steep terrain; and fast, cold-running streams. In 1980 the Andrews became a charter member of the National Science Foundation's Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) Program.
TurtleSAT is a new website where communities are mapping the location of freshwater turtles in waterways and wetlands across the country. Australia's unique freshwater turtles are in crisis - their numbers are declining and your help is needed to record where you see turtles in your local area.
WHOI is the world's leading non-profit oceanographic research organization. WHOI maintains unparalleled depth and breadth of expertise across a range of oceanographic research areas. Institution scientists and engineers work collaboratively within and across six research departments to advance knowledge of the global ocean and its fundamental importance to other planetary systems. At the same time, they also train future generations of ocean scientists and address problems that have a direct impact in efforts to understand and manage critical marine resources.
The Biodiversity Research Program (PPBio) was created in 2004 with the aims of furthering biodiversity studies in Brazil, decentralizing scientific production from already-developed academic centers, integrating research activities and disseminating results across a variety of purposes, including environmental management and education.
The BBS is a cooperative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey's Patuxent Wildlife Research Center and Environment Canada's Canadian Wildlife Service to monitor the status and trends of North American bird populations. Following a rigorous protocol, BBS data are collected by thousands of dedicated participants along thousands of randomly established roadside routes throughout the continent. Professional BBS coordinators and data managers work closely with researchers and statisticians to compile and deliver these population data and population trend analyses on more than 400 bird species, for use by conservation managers, scientists, and the general public.
Earthdata powered by EOSDIS (Earth Observing System Data and Information System) is a key core capability in NASA’s Earth Science Data Systems Program. It provides end-to-end capabilities for managing NASA’s Earth science data from various sources – satellites, aircraft, field measurements, and various other programs. For the EOS satellite missions, EOSDIS provides capabilities for command and control, scheduling, data capture and initial (Level 0) processing. These capabilities, constituting the EOSDIS Mission Operations, are managed by the Earth Science Mission Operations (ESMO) Project. NASA network capabilities transport the data to the science operations facilities. EOSDIS uses the metadata and service discovery tool Earthdata Search https://search.earthdata.nasa.gov/ (formerly: REVERB).
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Australian Waterbird Surveys (AWS) is an information source of waterbird communities around Australia, based on surveys of their diversity and numbers. It relies on rigorous data collection protocols and includes more than 50 waterbird species and up to 30 years of survey data. This open source also includes the extent of flooding of thousands of wetlands observed during our surveys. As a group, waterbirds can be sentinels of the ecological health of our wetlands and rivers. We hope this free information system will help track long-term changes in the environment, provide an assessment tool for individual species, report on our national and international responsibilities and help improve the way we manage our rivers and wetlands. It has been developed with the support of research and government partners.
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Environment and Climate Change Canada collects biological samples from a number of lakes and rivers across Canada in support of federally mandated programs. Environment and Climate Change Canada has collected fish and invertebrates from the Great Lakes since 1977 in support of the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement (GLWQA). More recently, samples have been collected nationally to support Canada's Chemicals Management Plan and the Clean Air Regulatory Agenda. Environment and Climate Change Canada also maintains a specimen bank of frozen tissues which is a requirement of the GLWQA and is an integral part of departmental monitoring and research programs. The National Aquatic Biological Specimen Bank (NABSB) is located in a dedicated facility at the Canada Centre for Inland Waters in Burlington, Ontario. The NABSB holds more than 37,000 samples of fish and invertebrates collected over the last 30+ years of environmental monitoring in Canada. Research conducted using samples from the NABSB has produced more than 60 scientific publications, reports and book chapters
The sequencing of several bird genomes and the anticipated sequencing of many more provided the impetus to develop a model organism database devoted to the taxonomic class: Aves. Birds provide model organisms important to the study of neurobiology, immunology, genetics, development, oncology, virology, cardiovascular biology, evolution and a variety of other life sciences. Many bird species are also important to agriculture, providing an enormous worldwide food source worldwide. Genomic approaches are proving invaluable to studying traits that affect meat yield, disease resistance, behavior, and bone development along with many other factors affecting productivity. In this context, BirdBase will serve both biomedical and agricultural researchers.