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TEAM is devoted to monitoring long-term trends in biodiversity, land cover change, climate and ecosystem services in tropical forests. Tropical forests received first billing because of their overwhelming significance to the global biosphere (e.g., their disproportionately large role in global carbon and energy cycles) and because of the extraordinary threats they face. About 50 percent of the species described on Earth, and an even larger proportion of species not yet described, occur in tropical forests. TEAM aims to measure and compare plants, terrestrial mammals, ground-dwelling birds and climate using a standard methodology in a range of tropical forests, from relatively pristine places to those most affected by people. TEAM currently operates in sixteen tropical forest sites across Africa, Asia and Latin America supporting a network of scientists committed to standardized methods of data collection to quantify how plants and animals respond to pressures such as climate change and human encroachment.
The Digital Morphology library, part of the National Science Foundation Digital Libraries Initiative, is a dynamic archive of information on digital morphology and high-resolution X-ray computed tomography of biological specimens. Digital Morphology, part of the National Science Foundation Digital Libraries Initiative, develops and serves unique 2D and 3D visualizations of the internal and external structure of living and extinct vertebrates, and a growing number of 'invertebrates.' The Digital Morphology library contains nearly a terabyte of imagery of natural history specimens that are important to education and central to ongoing cutting-edge research efforts.
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Welcome to the digital flora of Panama. You may access the taxonomic list of lianas, common trees, shrubs and palms by species name, family, or by their common names in Panama. There are for each species: a botanical description, photos, scans, drawings, and a distribution map showing its presence or absence in a series of floristic inventories and plots established by the Center for Tropical Forest Science in the Panama Canal watershed. A map of its distribution in the countries of Panama and its neighbor Costa Rica includes data from the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF) network (http://www.gbif.org/). Some families include descriptions.