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Found 8 result(s)
The tree of life links all biodiversity through a shared evolutionary history. This project will produce the first online, comprehensive first-draft tree of all 1.8 million named species, accessible to both the public and scientific communities. Assembly of the tree will incorporate previously-published results, with strong collaborations between computational and empirical biologists to develop, test and improve methods of data synthesis. This initial tree of life will not be static; instead, we will develop tools for scientists to update and revise the tree as new data come in. Early release of the tree and tools will motivate data sharing and facilitate ongoing synthesis of knowledge.
Neotoma is a multiproxy paleoecological database that covers the Pliocene-Quaternary, including modern microfossil samples. The database is an international collaborative effort among individuals from 19 institutions, representing multiple constituent databases. There are over 20 data-types within the Neotoma Paleoecological Database, including pollen microfossils, plant macrofossils, vertebrate fauna, diatoms, charcoal, biomarkers, ostracodes, physical sedimentology and water chemistry. Neotoma provides an underlying cyberinfrastructure that enables the development of common software tools for data ingest, discovery, display, analysis, and distribution, while giving domain scientists control over critical taxonomic and other data quality issues.
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The database contains photographs of plants from West Africa in a broad geographical sense, mainly from the savanna regions.
EuPathDB (formerly ApiDB) is an integrated database covering the eukaryotic pathogens in the genera Acanthamoeba, Annacaliia, Babesia, Crithidia, Cryptosporidium, Edhazardia, Eimeria, Encephalitozoon, Endotrypanum, Entamoeba, Enterocytozoon, Giardia, Gregarina, Hamiltosporidium, Leishmania, Nematocida, Neospora, Nosema, Plasmodium, Theileria, Toxoplasma, Trichomonas, Trypanosoma and Vavraia, Vittaforma). While each of these groups is supported by a taxon-specific database built upon the same infrastructure, the EuPathDB portal offers an entry point to all of these resources, and the opportunity to leverage orthology for searches across genera.
NBN is the National Biodiversity Network's Gateway. Use it to explore UK biodiversity data, as contributed by participating data providers
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The Center for Tropical Forest Science (CTFS) is a global network of forest research plots committed to the study of tropical and temperate forest function and diversity. The multi-institutional network comprises more than forty forest research plots across the Americas, Africa, Asia, and Europe, with a strong focus on tropical regions. CTFS monitors the growth and survival of about 6 million trees of approximately 10,000 species.
The NCBI Taxonomy database is a curated set of names and classifications for all of the organisms that are represented in GenBank. The EMBL and DDBJ databases, as well as GenBank, now use the NCBI Taxonomy as the standard classification for nucleotide sequences. Taxonomy Contains the names and phylogenetic lineages of more than 160,000 organisms that have molecular data in the NCBI databases. New taxa are added to the Taxonomy database as data are deposited for them. When new sequences are submitted to GenBank, the submission is checked for new organism names, which are then classified and added to the Taxonomy database.