Filter
Reset all

Subjects

Content Types

Countries

AID systems

API

Certificates

Data access

Data access restrictions

Database access

Database access restrictions

Database licenses

Data licenses

Data upload

Data upload restrictions

Enhanced publication

Institution responsibility type

Institution type

Keywords

Metadata standards

PID systems

Provider types

Quality management

Repository languages

Software

Syndications

Repository types

Versioning

  • * at the end of a keyword allows wildcard searches
  • " quotes can be used for searching phrases
  • + represents an AND search (default)
  • | represents an OR search
  • - represents a NOT operation
  • ( and ) implies priority
  • ~N after a word specifies the desired edit distance (fuzziness)
  • ~N after a phrase specifies the desired slop amount
Found 158 result(s)
AceView provides a curated, comprehensive and non-redundant sequence representation of all public mRNA sequences (mRNAs from GenBank or RefSeq, and single pass cDNA sequences from dbEST and Trace). These experimental cDNA sequences are first co-aligned on the genome then clustered into a minimal number of alternative transcript variants and grouped into genes. Using exhaustively and with high quality standards the available cDNA sequences evidences the beauty and complexity of mammals’ transcriptome, and the relative simplicity of the nematode and plant transcriptomes. Genes are classified according to their inferred coding potential; many presumably non-coding genes are discovered. Genes are named by Entrez Gene names when available, else by AceView gene names, stable from release to release. Alternative features (promoters, introns and exons, polyadenylation signals) and coding potential, including motifs, domains, and homologies are annotated in depth; tissues where expression has been observed are listed in order of representation; diseases, phenotypes, pathways, functions, localization or interactions are annotated by mining selected sources, in particular PubMed, GAD and Entrez Gene, and also by performing manual annotation, especially in the worm. In this way, both the anatomy and physiology of the experimentally cDNA supported human, mouse and nematode genes are thoroughly annotated.
Country
TERN's AEKOS data portal is the original gateway to Australian ecology data. It is a ‘data and research methods’ data portal for Australia’s land-dwelling plants, animals and their environments. The primary focus of data content is raw co-located ‘species and environment’ ecological survey data that has been collected at the ‘plot’ level to describe biodiversity, its patterns and ecological processes. It is openly accessible with standard discovery metadata and user-oriented, contextual metadata critical for data reuse. Our services support the ecosystem science community, land managers and governments seeking to publish under COPE publishing ethics and the FAIR data publishing principles. AEKOS is registered with Thomson & Reuters Data Citation Index and is a recommended repository of Nature Publishing’s Scientific Data. There are currently 97,037 sites covering mostly plant biodiversity and co-located environmental data of Australia. The AEKOS initiative is supported by TERN (tern.org.au), hosted by The University of Adelaide and funded by the Australian Government’s National Research Infrastructure for Australia.
Ag Data Commons (ADC) provides access to a wide variety of open data relevant to agricultural research. We are a centralized repository for data already on the web, as well as for new data being published for the first time. While compliance with the U.S. Federal public access and open data directives is important, we aim to surpass them. Our goal is that ADC will foster innovative data re-use, integration, and visualization to support bigger, better science and policy.
The USGS Alaska Region has the largest geographic extent of the seven regional units within the USGS and represents a dynamic landscape of great natural wonder. It is a transforming landscape shaped by volcanoes, earthquakes, major rivers, and glaciers and a strategic landscape of yet untapped mineral and energy resources. The Region conducts research to help inform management of the extensive national parks and wildlife refuges of the far north and the international birds, fish, and marine mammals that migrate to these lands and waters; informs national Arctic energy policy through research on the National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska and the U.S. Outer Continental Shelf; and provides science to understand, help respond to and mitigate impacts from natural hazards. This work is accomplished in part by the Region's two Science Centers headquartered in Anchorage, the Alaska Science Center and the Volcano Science Center.
ArrayExpress is one of the major international repositories for high-throughput functional genomics data from both microarray and high-throughput sequencing studies, many of which are supported by peer-reviewed publications. Data sets are either submitted directly to ArrayExpress and curated by a team of specialist biological curators, or are imported systematically from the NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus database on a weekly basis. Data is collected to MIAME and MINSEQE standards.
Country
The Atlantic Canada Conservation Data Centre (ACCDC) maintains comprehensive lists of plant and animal species. The Atlantic CDC has geo-located records of species occurrences and records of extremely rare to uncommon species in the Atlantic region, including New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, Newfoundland, and Labrador. The Atlantic CDC also maintains biological and other types of data in a variety of linked databases.
Country
The Atlas of Living Australia (ALA) combines and provides scientifically collected data from a wide range of sources such as museums, herbaria, community groups, government departments, individuals and universities. Data records consist of images, literature, molecular DNA data, identification keys, species interaction data, species profile data, nomenclature, source data, conservation indicators, and spatial data.
Country
The Australian SuperSite Network Data Portal presents data on vegetation, fauna, soil, water, daily meteorology and daily recorded soundscapes from 10 SuperSites across a diverse range of biomes, including tropical rainforest, grassland and savanna; wet and dry sclerophyll forest and woodland; and semi-arid grassland, woodland and savanna.
The British Columbia Conservation Data Centre (CDC) collects and disseminates information on plants, animals and ecosystems at risk in British Columbia. The " BC Species and Ecosystems Explorer" is a source for authoritative conservation information on approximately 7400 plants and animals, and over 600 ecological communities (ecosystems)in British Columbia. Information includes conservation status, legal designation, and ecosection values for ecological communities.
The Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) provides DNA barcode data. BOLD's online workbench supports data validation, annotation, and publication for specimen, distributional, and molecular data. The platform consists of four main modules: a data portal, a database of barcode clusters, an educational portal, and a data collection workbench. BOLD is the go-to site for DNA-based identification. As the central informatics platform for DNA barcoding, BOLD plays a crucial role in assimilating and organizing data gathered by the international barcode research community. Two iBOL (International Barcode of Life) Working Groups are supporting the ongoing development of BOLD.
BioDare stands for Biological Data Repository, its main focus is data from circadian experiments. BioDare is an online facility to share, store, analyse and disseminate timeseries data, focussing on circadian clock data, with browser and web service interfaces. Toolbox features include an improved, speedier FFT-NLLs routine and ROBuST’s Spectrum Resampling tool that will analyse rhythmic time series data.
Country
In the framework of an initiative to advance biodiversity research in Germany, we established three exemplary large-scale and long-term research sites (funded by the German Research Foundation). They are termed Biodiversity Exploratories, in contrast to mainly descriptive observatories. The exploratories sustain the scientific infrastructure to develop the intellectual framework needed to address critical questions about changes in biodiversity and to evaluate the impacts of those changes for ecosystem processes. Thus, in the exploratories biodiversity and ecosystem research will be merged at a large scale and with a long-term perspective. In the first phase 2006-09 the exploratories addressed the relationship between land-use intensity, biodiversity change, and ecosystem functioning for selected taxa. In 2008 the exploratories integrated further contributing projects proposed by the German research community. Thus, the biodiversity exploratories serve as a stimulating research platform for the whole German biodiversity research community. Comprehensive data are collected for about ten years: In the Hainich, in the Swabian Alb and in the Schorfheide scientist examining from all over Germany Biodiversity and analyze ecosystem processes. Computer scientists from the University of Jena now publish first data from the Biodiversity exploratories on internet, to make it so for further research available.
Antarctic marine and terrestrial biodiversity data is widely scattered, patchy and often not readily accessible. In many cases the data is in danger of being irretrievably lost. Biodiversity.aq establishes and supports a distributed system of interoperable databases, giving easy access through a single internet portal to a set of resources relevant to research, conservation and management pertaining to Antarctic biodiversity. biodiversity.aq provides access to both marine and terrestrial Antarctic biodiversity data.
BIOS is a system designed to enable the management, visualization, and analysis of biogeographic data collected by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife and its partner organizations. BIOS integrates GIS, relational database management, and ESRI's ArcGIS Server technology to create a statewide, integrated information management tool that can be used on any computer with access to the Internet.
This site offers an enormous collection of photographs of wild species and natural history objects. It covers most groups of organisms with the exception of birds and other vertebrates. The photographs are presented to illustrate biodiversity and as an aid to identification. The criterion for inclusion of a species is that it must have been, or might be expected to be, found in Britain or Ireland. BioImages follows the biological classification. This is a hierarchical system with species grouped in genera, genera in families, families in orders and so on up to kingdoms and superkingdoms. Biota takes you to the top of the classification tree.
Biological collections are replete with taxonomic, geographic, temporal, numerical, and historical information. This information is crucial for understanding and properly managing biodiversity and ecosystems, but is often difficult to access. Canadensys, operated from the Université de Montréal Biodiversity Centre, is a Canada-wide effort to unlock the biodiversity information held in biological collections.
The CBIF provides primary data on biological species of interest to Canadians. CBIF supports a wide range of social and economic decisions including efforts to conserve our biodiversity in healthy ecosystems, use our biological resources in sustainable ways, and monitor and control pests and diseases. Tools provided by the CBIF include the Integrated Taxonomic Information System (ITIS), Species Access Network, Online Mapping, and the SpeciesBank, including Butterflies of Canada. The CBIF is a member of the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF).
Country
The Canadian Environmental Sustainability Indicators (CESI) program provides data and information to track Canada’s performance on key environmental sustainability issues including climate change and air quality, water quality and availability, and protected nature. The CESI website ensures that national, regional, local and international trends are readily accessible and transparently presented to all Canadians through the use of graphics, explanatory text, interactive maps and downloadable data.
Country
The Canadian Poisonous Plants Information System presents data on plants that cause poisoning in livestock, pets, and humans. The plants include native, introduced, and cultivated outdoor plants as well as indoor plants that are found in Canada. Some food and herbal plants that may cause potential poisoning problems are also included.
Country
The Large Fire Database (LFDB) is a compilation of forest fire data from all Canadian agencies, including provinces, territories, and Parks Canada. The data set includes only fires greater than 200 hectares in final size; these represent only a few percent of all fires but account for most of the area burned (usually more than 97%). Therefore, the LFDB can be used for spatial and temporal analyses of landscape-scale fire impacts. For information on smaller fires (up to 200 ha in final size), please contact individual fire agencies. Links to other agencies can be found through the Canadian Interagency Forest Fire Centre (CIFFC).
The Catalogue of Life is the most comprehensive and authoritative global index of species currently available. It consists of a single integrated species checklist and taxonomic hierarchy. The Catalogue holds essential information on the names, relationships and distributions of over 1.6 million species. This figure continues to rise as information is compiled from diverse sources around the world.
The CGIAR Research Program No. 6 (CRP6): Forests, Trees and Agroforestry: Livelihoods, Landscapes and Governance aims to enhance the management and use of forests, agroforestry and tree genetic resources across the landscape, from farms to forests.