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Found 6 result(s)
In the framework of the Collaborative Research Centre/Transregio 32 ‘Patterns in Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Systems: Monitoring, Modelling, and Data Assimilation’ (CRC/TR32,, funded by the German Research Foundation from 2007 to 2018, a RDM system was self-designed and implemented. The so-called CRC/TR32 project database (TR32DB, is operating online since early 2008. The TR32DB handles all data including metadata, which are created by the involved project participants from several institutions (e.g. Universities of Cologne, Bonn, Aachen, and the Research Centre Jülich) and research fields (e.g. soil and plant sciences, hydrology, geography, geophysics, meteorology, remote sensing). The data is resulting from several field measurement campaigns, meteorological monitoring, remote sensing, laboratory studies and modelling approaches. Furthermore, outcomes of the scientists such as publications, conference contributions, PhD reports and corresponding images are collected in the TR32DB.
The Arctic Data Center is the primary data and software repository for the Arctic section of NSF Polar Programs. The Center helps the research community to reproducibly preserve and discover all products of NSF-funded research in the Arctic, including data, metadata, software, documents, and provenance that links these together. The repository is open to contributions from NSF Arctic investigators, and data are released under an open license (CC-BY, CC0, depending on the choice of the contributor). All science, engineering, and education research supported by the NSF Arctic research program are included, such as Natural Sciences (Geoscience, Earth Science, Oceanography, Ecology, Atmospheric Science, Biology, etc.) and Social Sciences (Archeology, Anthropology, Social Science, etc.). Key to the initiative is the partnership between NCEAS at UC Santa Barbara, DataONE, and NOAA’s NCEI, each of which bring critical capabilities to the Center. Infrastructure from the successful NSF-sponsored DataONE federation of data repositories enables data replication to NCEI, providing both offsite and institutional diversity that are critical to long term preservation.
TemperateReefBase is a resource for temperate reef researchers worldwide to use and contribute data. Unique in its role as a one-stop-shop for global temperate reef data, TemperateReefBase was initially established by IMAS in collaboration with the Kelp Ecology Ecosystem Network (KEEN). KEEN was instigated through a National Centre for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) working group which assembled experts from around the world to examine the impacts of global change on kelp-bed ecosystem worldwide. The group has assembled significant global data for kelps, other seaweeds and associated species including fishes, and has embarked on unprecedented global experiments and surveys in which identical experiments and surveys are being conducted at sites in kelp beds around the world to determine global trends and examine the capacity of kelps to respond to disturbance in the face of climate change and other anthropogenic stressors. The TemperateReefBase Data Portal is an online discovery interface showcasing temperate reef data collected from around the globe. The portal aims to make this data freely and openly available for the benefit of marine and environmental science as a whole. The TemperateReefBase Data Portal is hosted and maintained by the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies at the University of Tasmania, Australia.
The Andrews Forest is a place of inquiry. Our mission is to support research on forests, streams, and watersheds, and to foster strong collaboration among ecosystem science, education, natural resource management, and the humanities. Our place and our work are administered cooperatively by the USDA Forest Service's Pacific Northwest Research Station, Oregon State University, and the Willamette National Forest. First established in 1948 as an US Forest Service Experimental Forest, the H.J. Andrews is a 16,000-acre ecological research site in Oregon's beautiful western Cascades Mountains. The landscape is home to iconic Pacific Northwest old-growth forests of Cedar and Hemlock, and moss-draped ancient Douglas Firs; steep terrain; and fast, cold-running streams. In 1980 the Andrews became a charter member of the National Science Foundation's Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) Program.
BIOS is a system designed to enable the management, visualization, and analysis of biogeographic data collected by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife and its partner organizations. BIOS integrates GIS, relational database management, and ESRI's ArcGIS Server technology to create a statewide, integrated information management tool that can be used on any computer with access to the Internet.