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Found 97 result(s)
The Structure database provides three-dimensional structures of macromolecules for a variety of research purposes and allows the user to retrieve structures for specific molecule types as well as structures for genes and proteins of interest. Three main databases comprise Structure-The Molecular Modeling Database; Conserved Domains and Protein Classification; and the BioSystems Database. Structure also links to the PubChem databases to connect biological activity data to the macromolecular structures. Users can locate structural templates for proteins and interactively view structures and sequence data to closely examine sequence-structure relationships.
The Fish Database of Taiwan is a complex of research data for about 25 years to the Lab of Fish Ecology and Evolution, which is situated in Biodiversity Research Center of Academia Sinica.
Content type(s)
This database host for fungi data related to new classification with morphology, molecular and other important data. This fungal database allows deposition of taxonomic data, phenotypic details and other useful data, which will enhance our current taxonomic understanding and ultimately enable mycologists to gain better and updated insights into the current fungal classification system. In addition, the database will also allow access to comprehensive metadata including descriptions of voucher and type specimens.
VegBank is the vegetation plot database of the Ecological Society of America's Panel on Vegetation Classification. VegBank consists of three linked databases that contain the actual plot records, vegetation types recognized in the U.S. National Vegetation Classification and other vegetation types submitted by users, and all plant taxa recognized by ITIS/USDA as well as all other plant taxa recorded in plot records. Vegetation records, community types and plant taxa may be submitted to VegBank and may be subsequently searched, viewed, annotated, revised, interpreted, downloaded, and cited. VegBank receives its data from the VegBank community of users.
The Expression Atlas provides information on gene expression patterns under different biological conditions such as a gene knock out, a plant treated with a compound, or in a particular organism part or cell. It includes both microarray and RNA-seq data. The data is re-analysed in-house to detect interesting expression patterns under the conditions of the original experiment. There are two components to the Expression Atlas, the Baseline Atlas and the Differential Atlas. The Baseline Atlas displays information about which gene products are present (and at what abundance) in "normal" conditions (e.g. tissue, cell type). It aims to answer questions such as "which genes are specifically expressed in human kidney?". This component of the Expression Atlas consists of highly-curated and quality-checked RNA-seq experiments from ArrayExpress. It has data for many different animal and plant species. New experiments are added as they become available. The Differential Atlas allows users to identify genes that are up- or down-regulated in a wide variety of different experimental conditions such as yeast mutants, cadmium treated plants, cystic fibrosis or the effect on gene expression of mind-body practice. Both microarray and RNA-seq experiments are included in the Differential Atlas. Experiments are selected from ArrayExpress and groups of samples are manually identified for comparison e.g. those with wild type genotype compared to those with a gene knock out. Each experiment is processed through our in-house differential expression statistical analysis pipeline to identify genes with a high probability of differential expression.
The Plant Metabolic Network (PMN) provides a broad network of plant metabolic pathway databases that contain curated information from the literature and computational analyses about the genes, enzymes, compounds, reactions, and pathways involved in primary and secondary metabolism in plants. The PMN currently houses one multi-species reference database called PlantCyc and 22 species/taxon-specific databases.
CPLM (Compendium of Protein Lysine Modifications) is an online data resource specifically designed for protein lysine modifications (PLMs). The CPLM database was extended and adapted from our CPLA 1.0 (Compendium of Protein Lysine Acetylation) database and the 2.0 release contains 203,972 modification events on 189,919 modified lysines in 45,748 proteins for 12 types of PLMs, including Nε-lysine acetylation, ubiquitination, methylation, sumoylation, glycation, butyrylation, crotonylation, malonylation, propionylation, succinylation, phosphoglycerylation and prokaryotic Pupylation.
dbEST is a division of GenBank that contains sequence data and other information on "single-pass" cDNA sequences, or "Expressed Sequence Tags", from a number of organisms. Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) are short (usually about 300-500 bp), single-pass sequence reads from mRNA (cDNA). Typically they are produced in large batches. They represent a snapshot of genes expressed in a given tissue and/or at a given developmental stage. They are tags (some coding, others not) of expression for a given cDNA library. Most EST projects develop large numbers of sequences. These are commonly submitted to GenBank and dbEST as batches of dozens to thousands of entries, with a great deal of redundancy in the citation, submitter and library information. To improve the efficiency of the submission process for this type of data, we have designed a special streamlined submission process and data format. dbEST also includes sequences that are longer than the traditional ESTs, or are produced as single sequences or in small batches. Among these sequences are products of differential display experiments and RACE experiments. The thing that these sequences have in common with traditional ESTs, regardless of length, quality, or quantity, is that there is little information that can be annotated in the record. If a sequence is later characterized and annotated with biological features such as a coding region, 5'UTR, or 3'UTR, it should be submitted through the regular GenBank submissions procedure (via BankIt or Sequin), even if part of the sequence is already in dbEST. dbEST is reserved for single-pass reads. Assembled sequences should not be submitted to dbEST. GenBank will accept assembled EST submissions for the forthcoming TSA (Transcriptome Shotgun Assembly) division. The individual reads which make up the assembly should be submitted to dbEST, the Trace archive or the Short Read Archive (SRA) prior to the submission of the assemblies.
The Atlantic Canada Conservation Data Centre (ACCDC) maintains comprehensive lists of plant and animal species. The Atlantic CDC has geo-located records of species occurrences and records of extremely rare to uncommon species in the Atlantic region, including New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, Newfoundland, and Labrador. The Atlantic CDC also maintains biological and other types of data in a variety of linked databases.
Xanthobase provides information on Xanthomonas oryzae pv oryzae (Xoo), the rice (Oryza sativa) pathogenic bacterium in which genome sequencing has revealed very extensive race differentiation. The whole genome sequence of its native host has also been completed, and analysis of the host parasite interaction on the basis of the two genomes can be expected to be useful.
Species included in PlantTFDB 4.0 covers the main lineages of green plants. Therefore, PlantTFDB provides genomic TF repertoires across Viridiplantae. To provide comprehensive information for the TF family, a brief introduction and key references are presented for each family. Comprehensive annotations are made for each identified TF, including functional domains, 3D structures, gene ontology (GO), plant ontology (PO), expression information, expert-curated functional description, regulation information, interaction, conserved elements, references, and annotations in various databases such as UniProt, RefSeq, TransFac, STRING, and VISTA. By inferring orthologous groups and constructing phylogenetic trees, evolutionary relationships among identified TFs were inferred. In addition, PlantTFDB has a simple and user-friendly interface to allow users to query based on combined conditions or make sequence similarity search using BLAST.
Chinese Crop Germplasm Resources Information System provides germplasm resources and genetic information for crops including grains, fruits, vegetables, oilseeds, and fibers. The data includes crop fingerprint and DNA sequence data.
Antarctic marine and terrestrial biodiversity data is widely scattered, patchy and often not readily accessible. In many cases the data is in danger of being irretrievably lost. establishes and supports a distributed system of interoperable databases, giving easy access through a single internet portal to a set of resources relevant to research, conservation and management pertaining to Antarctic biodiversity. provides access to both marine and terrestrial Antarctic biodiversity data.
The Canadian Environmental Sustainability Indicators (CESI) program provides data and information to track Canada’s performance on key environmental sustainability issues including climate change and air quality, water quality and availability, and protected nature. The CESI website ensures that national, regional, local and international trends are readily accessible and transparently presented to all Canadians through the use of graphics, explanatory text, interactive maps and downloadable data.
The database MORPHYLL contains quantitative and qualitative morphometric data of fossil angiosperm leaves from the Paleogene. The data are compiled from different fossil sites housed in various European Natural History Museums.
MetaCrop is a database that summarizes diverse information about metabolic pathways in crop plants and allows automatic export of information for the creation of detailed metabolic models. MetaCrop is a database that contains manually curated, highly detailed information about metabolic pathways in crop plants, including location information, transport processes and reaction kinetics.
SeSam is an outstanding international collection of recent and fossil animals and plants from all over the world. It also holds an important specialized library. The really substantial data of this collection constitute the basis of every taxonomic-systematical, ecological, biogeographical or biostratigraphical fundamental research as well as every practical environmental research. Because of its historical referencings this collection is also a precious cultural treasure that generates the often expensive heavy mission of its conservation.
This is a database for vegetation data from West Africa, i.e. phytosociological and dendrometric relevés as well as floristic inventories. The West African Vegetation Database has been developed in the framework of the projects “Sustainable Use of Natural Vegetation in West Africa” (SUN, and “Biodiversity Transect Analysis in Africa” (BIOTA,
The Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD) provides comprehensive integrated biological information for the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae along with search and analysis tools to explore these data, enabling the discovery of functional relationships between sequence and gene products in fungi and higher organisms.
Content type(s)
Since the first discovery of RNA pseudoknots more and many more pseudoknots have been found. However, not all of those pseudoknot data are easy to trace. Sometimes the information is hidden in a publication where the title gives no hint that pseudoknot information is there. This was the first reason that we thought that a general accessible information source for pseudoknots would be handy.
AceView provides a curated, comprehensive and non-redundant sequence representation of all public mRNA sequences (mRNAs from GenBank or RefSeq, and single pass cDNA sequences from dbEST and Trace). These experimental cDNA sequences are first co-aligned on the genome then clustered into a minimal number of alternative transcript variants and grouped into genes. Using exhaustively and with high quality standards the available cDNA sequences evidences the beauty and complexity of mammals’ transcriptome, and the relative simplicity of the nematode and plant transcriptomes. Genes are classified according to their inferred coding potential; many presumably non-coding genes are discovered. Genes are named by Entrez Gene names when available, else by AceView gene names, stable from release to release. Alternative features (promoters, introns and exons, polyadenylation signals) and coding potential, including motifs, domains, and homologies are annotated in depth; tissues where expression has been observed are listed in order of representation; diseases, phenotypes, pathways, functions, localization or interactions are annotated by mining selected sources, in particular PubMed, GAD and Entrez Gene, and also by performing manual annotation, especially in the worm. In this way, both the anatomy and physiology of the experimentally cDNA supported human, mouse and nematode genes are thoroughly annotated.