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Found 69 result(s)
The Structure database provides three-dimensional structures of macromolecules for a variety of research purposes and allows the user to retrieve structures for specific molecule types as well as structures for genes and proteins of interest. Three main databases comprise Structure-The Molecular Modeling Database; Conserved Domains and Protein Classification; and the BioSystems Database. Structure also links to the PubChem databases to connect biological activity data to the macromolecular structures. Users can locate structural templates for proteins and interactively view structures and sequence data to closely examine sequence-structure relationships.
The tree of life links all biodiversity through a shared evolutionary history. This project will produce the first online, comprehensive first-draft tree of all 1.8 million named species, accessible to both the public and scientific communities. Assembly of the tree will incorporate previously-published results, with strong collaborations between computational and empirical biologists to develop, test and improve methods of data synthesis. This initial tree of life will not be static; instead, we will develop tools for scientists to update and revise the tree as new data come in. Early release of the tree and tools will motivate data sharing and facilitate ongoing synthesis of knowledge.
The Bavarian Natural History Collections (Staatliche Naturwissenschaftliche Sammlungen Bayerns, SNSB) are a research institution for natural history in Bavaria. They encompass five State Collections (zoology, botany, paleontology and geology, mineralogy, anthropology and paleoanatomy), the Botanical Garden Munich-Nymphenburg and eight museums with public exhibitions in Munich, Bamberg, Bayreuth, Eichstätt and Nördlingen. Our research focuses mainly on the past and present bio- and geodiversity and the evolution of animals and plants. To achieve this we have large scientific collections (almost 35,000,000 specimens). Collections and museums also play an instrumental role in public and academic education.
The Fish Database of Taiwan is a complex of research data for about 25 years to the Lab of Fish Ecology and Evolution, which is situated in Biodiversity Research Center of Academia Sinica.
Content type(s)
This database host for fungi data related to new classification with morphology, molecular and other important data. This fungal database allows deposition of taxonomic data, phenotypic details and other useful data, which will enhance our current taxonomic understanding and ultimately enable mycologists to gain better and updated insights into the current fungal classification system. In addition, the database will also allow access to comprehensive metadata including descriptions of voucher and type specimens.
ICRISAT performs crop improvement research, using conventional as well as methods derived from biotechnology, on the following crops: Chickpea, Pigeonpea, Groundnut, Pearl millet,Sorghum and Small millets. ICRISAT's data repository collects, preserves and facilitates access to the datasets produced by ICRISAT researchers to all users who are interested in. Data includes Phenotypic, Genotypic, Social Science, and Spatial data, Soil and Weather.
dbEST is a division of GenBank that contains sequence data and other information on "single-pass" cDNA sequences, or "Expressed Sequence Tags", from a number of organisms. Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) are short (usually about 300-500 bp), single-pass sequence reads from mRNA (cDNA). Typically they are produced in large batches. They represent a snapshot of genes expressed in a given tissue and/or at a given developmental stage. They are tags (some coding, others not) of expression for a given cDNA library. Most EST projects develop large numbers of sequences. These are commonly submitted to GenBank and dbEST as batches of dozens to thousands of entries, with a great deal of redundancy in the citation, submitter and library information. To improve the efficiency of the submission process for this type of data, we have designed a special streamlined submission process and data format. dbEST also includes sequences that are longer than the traditional ESTs, or are produced as single sequences or in small batches. Among these sequences are products of differential display experiments and RACE experiments. The thing that these sequences have in common with traditional ESTs, regardless of length, quality, or quantity, is that there is little information that can be annotated in the record. If a sequence is later characterized and annotated with biological features such as a coding region, 5'UTR, or 3'UTR, it should be submitted through the regular GenBank submissions procedure (via BankIt or Sequin), even if part of the sequence is already in dbEST. dbEST is reserved for single-pass reads. Assembled sequences should not be submitted to dbEST. GenBank will accept assembled EST submissions for the forthcoming TSA (Transcriptome Shotgun Assembly) division. The individual reads which make up the assembly should be submitted to dbEST, the Trace archive or the Short Read Archive (SRA) prior to the submission of the assemblies.
The Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research (IPK) and the German Plant Phenotyping Network (DPPN) has jointly initiated the Plant Genomics and Phenomics Research Data Repository (PGP) as infrastructure to comprehensively publish plant research data []. This covers in particular these cross-domain data sets that are not being published in central repositories because of its huge volume, unsupported data domain or scope, like image collections from plant phenotyping and microscopy, unassembled sequences, genotyping data, visualizations of complex morphological plant models, movies plant 3-D models, raw data from mass spectrometry, software, and documents. Accepted data is published as citable DOIs and core set of technical metadata is registered at DataCite. The used e!DAL-embedded Web frontend generates for each data set a landing page and supports an interactive exploration of available datasets. This long-term stable access to plant genomic and phenomic primary data records across domains and laboratories in one repository can empower researchers to reproduce already published analysis results as well as performing subsequent, advanced studies.
The objective of this Research Coordination Network project is to develop an international network of researchers who use genetic methodologies to study the ecology and evolution of marine organisms in the Indo-Pacific to share data, ideas and methods. DIPnet was created to advance genetic diversity research in the Indo-Pacific by aggregating population genetic metadata into a searchable database (GeOME).
The Maize Genetics and Genomics Database focuses on collecting data related to the crop plant and model organism Zea mays. The project's goals are to synthesize, display, and provide access to maize genomics and genetics data, prioritizing mutant and phenotype data and tools, structural and genetic map sets, and gene models. MaizeGDB also aims to make the Maize Newsletter available, and provide support services to the community of maize researchers. MaizeGDB is working with the Schnable lab, the Panzea project, The Genome Reference Consortium, and iPlant Collaborative to create a plan for archiving, dessiminating, visualizing, and analyzing diversity data. MMaizeGDB is short for Maize Genetics/Genomics Database. It is a USDA/ARS funded project to integrate the data found in MaizeDB and ZmDB into a single schema, develop an effective interface to access this data, and develop additional tools to make data analysis easier. Our goal in the long term is a true next-generation online maize database.aize genetics and genomics database.
Morph·D·Base has been developed to serve scientific research and education. It provides a platform for storing the detailed documentation of all material, methods, procedures, and concepts applied, together with the specific parameters, values, techniques, and instruments used during morphological data production. In other words, it's purpose is to provide a publicly available resource for recording and documenting morphological metadata. Moreover, it is also a repository for different types of media files that can be uploaded in order to serve as support and empirical substantiation of the results of morphological investigations. Our long-term perspective with Morph·D·Base is to provide an instrument that will enable a highly formalized and standardized way of generating morphological descriptions using a morphological ontology that will be based on the web ontology language (OWL - This, however, represents a project that is still in development.
MycoCosm, the DOE JGI’s web-based fungal genomics resource, which integrates fungal genomics data and analytical tools for fungal biologists. It provides navigation through sequenced genomes, genome analysis in context of comparative genomics and genome-centric view. MycoCosm promotes user community participation in data submission, annotation and analysis.
Ag Data Commons (ADC) provides access to a wide variety of open data relevant to agricultural research. We are a centralized repository for data already on the web, as well as for new data being published for the first time. While compliance with the U.S. Federal public access and open data directives is important, we aim to surpass them. Our goal is that ADC will foster innovative data re-use, integration, and visualization to support bigger, better science and policy.
Antarctic marine and terrestrial biodiversity data is widely scattered, patchy and often not readily accessible. In many cases the data is in danger of being irretrievably lost. establishes and supports a distributed system of interoperable databases, giving easy access through a single internet portal to a set of resources relevant to research, conservation and management pertaining to Antarctic biodiversity. provides access to both marine and terrestrial Antarctic biodiversity data.
GLOBE (Global Collaboration Engine) is an online collaborative environment that enables land change researchers to share, compare and integrate local and regional studies with global data to assess the global relevance of their work.
The Canadian Environmental Sustainability Indicators (CESI) program provides data and information to track Canada’s performance on key environmental sustainability issues including climate change and air quality, water quality and availability, and protected nature. The CESI website ensures that national, regional, local and international trends are readily accessible and transparently presented to all Canadians through the use of graphics, explanatory text, interactive maps and downloadable data.
This library is a public and easily accessible resource database of images, videos, and animations of cells, capturing a wide diversity of organisms, cell types, and cellular processes. The purpose of this database is to advance research on cellular activity, with the ultimate goal of improving human health.
This database serves forest tree scientists by providing online access to hardwood tree genomic and genetic data, including assembled reference genomes, transcriptomes, and genetic mapping information. The web site also provides access to tools for mining and visualization of these data sets, including BLAST for comparing sequences, Jbrowse for browsing genomes, Apollo for community annotation and Expression Analysis to build gene expression heatmaps.
Content type(s)
Since the first discovery of RNA pseudoknots more and many more pseudoknots have been found. However, not all of those pseudoknot data are easy to trace. Sometimes the information is hidden in a publication where the title gives no hint that pseudoknot information is there. This was the first reason that we thought that a general accessible information source for pseudoknots would be handy.
AceView provides a curated, comprehensive and non-redundant sequence representation of all public mRNA sequences (mRNAs from GenBank or RefSeq, and single pass cDNA sequences from dbEST and Trace). These experimental cDNA sequences are first co-aligned on the genome then clustered into a minimal number of alternative transcript variants and grouped into genes. Using exhaustively and with high quality standards the available cDNA sequences evidences the beauty and complexity of mammals’ transcriptome, and the relative simplicity of the nematode and plant transcriptomes. Genes are classified according to their inferred coding potential; many presumably non-coding genes are discovered. Genes are named by Entrez Gene names when available, else by AceView gene names, stable from release to release. Alternative features (promoters, introns and exons, polyadenylation signals) and coding potential, including motifs, domains, and homologies are annotated in depth; tissues where expression has been observed are listed in order of representation; diseases, phenotypes, pathways, functions, localization or interactions are annotated by mining selected sources, in particular PubMed, GAD and Entrez Gene, and also by performing manual annotation, especially in the worm. In this way, both the anatomy and physiology of the experimentally cDNA supported human, mouse and nematode genes are thoroughly annotated.