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Found 80 result(s)
The Entrez Protein Clusters database contains annotation information, publications, structures and analysis tools for related protein sequences encoded by complete genomes. The data available in the Protein Clusters Database is generated from prokaryotic genomic studies and is intended to assist researchers studying micro-organism evolution as well as other biological sciences. Available genomes include plants and viruses as well as organelles and microbial genomes.
The tree of life links all biodiversity through a shared evolutionary history. This project will produce the first online, comprehensive first-draft tree of all 1.8 million named species, accessible to both the public and scientific communities. Assembly of the tree will incorporate previously-published results, with strong collaborations between computational and empirical biologists to develop, test and improve methods of data synthesis. This initial tree of life will not be static; instead, we will develop tools for scientists to update and revise the tree as new data come in. Early release of the tree and tools will motivate data sharing and facilitate ongoing synthesis of knowledge.
The Bavarian Natural History Collections (Staatliche Naturwissenschaftliche Sammlungen Bayerns, SNSB) are a research institution for natural history in Bavaria. They encompass five State Collections (zoology, botany, paleontology and geology, mineralogy, anthropology and paleoanatomy), the Botanical Garden Munich-Nymphenburg and eight museums with public exhibitions in Munich, Bamberg, Bayreuth, Eichstätt and Nördlingen. Our research focuses mainly on the past and present bio- and geodiversity and the evolution of animals and plants. To achieve this we have large scientific collections (almost 35,000,000 specimens). Collections and museums also play an instrumental role in public and academic education.
The Expression Atlas provides information on gene expression patterns under different biological conditions such as a gene knock out, a plant treated with a compound, or in a particular organism part or cell. It includes both microarray and RNA-seq data. The data is re-analysed in-house to detect interesting expression patterns under the conditions of the original experiment. There are two components to the Expression Atlas, the Baseline Atlas and the Differential Atlas. The Baseline Atlas displays information about which gene products are present (and at what abundance) in "normal" conditions (e.g. tissue, cell type). It aims to answer questions such as "which genes are specifically expressed in human kidney?". This component of the Expression Atlas consists of highly-curated and quality-checked RNA-seq experiments from ArrayExpress. It has data for many different animal and plant species. New experiments are added as they become available. The Differential Atlas allows users to identify genes that are up- or down-regulated in a wide variety of different experimental conditions such as yeast mutants, cadmium treated plants, cystic fibrosis or the effect on gene expression of mind-body practice. Both microarray and RNA-seq experiments are included in the Differential Atlas. Experiments are selected from ArrayExpress and groups of samples are manually identified for comparison e.g. those with wild type genotype compared to those with a gene knock out. Each experiment is processed through our in-house differential expression statistical analysis pipeline to identify genes with a high probability of differential expression.
The Plant Metabolic Network (PMN) provides a broad network of plant metabolic pathway databases that contain curated information from the literature and computational analyses about the genes, enzymes, compounds, reactions, and pathways involved in primary and secondary metabolism in plants. The PMN currently houses one multi-species reference database called PlantCyc and 22 species/taxon-specific databases.
The USC Research Bank is the institutional research repository for the University of the Sunshine Coast. It provides an open access showcase of the University's scholarly research output ensuring that research is made available to the local, national and international communities. USC Research Bank is harvested by search engines, and is also indexed by the National Library of Australia's TROVE. By making research easily accessible, it also facilitates collaboration between researchers. Where possible, access to the full text of the publication is made available, in line with copyright permissions for each output. To access relevant research, use the Browse function, or specific records can be searched for by using the search box. Find research data by filtering by resource type 'Research Dataset'.
dbEST is a division of GenBank that contains sequence data and other information on "single-pass" cDNA sequences, or "Expressed Sequence Tags", from a number of organisms. Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) are short (usually about 300-500 bp), single-pass sequence reads from mRNA (cDNA). Typically they are produced in large batches. They represent a snapshot of genes expressed in a given tissue and/or at a given developmental stage. They are tags (some coding, others not) of expression for a given cDNA library. Most EST projects develop large numbers of sequences. These are commonly submitted to GenBank and dbEST as batches of dozens to thousands of entries, with a great deal of redundancy in the citation, submitter and library information. To improve the efficiency of the submission process for this type of data, we have designed a special streamlined submission process and data format. dbEST also includes sequences that are longer than the traditional ESTs, or are produced as single sequences or in small batches. Among these sequences are products of differential display experiments and RACE experiments. The thing that these sequences have in common with traditional ESTs, regardless of length, quality, or quantity, is that there is little information that can be annotated in the record. If a sequence is later characterized and annotated with biological features such as a coding region, 5'UTR, or 3'UTR, it should be submitted through the regular GenBank submissions procedure (via BankIt or Sequin), even if part of the sequence is already in dbEST. dbEST is reserved for single-pass reads. Assembled sequences should not be submitted to dbEST. GenBank will accept assembled EST submissions for the forthcoming TSA (Transcriptome Shotgun Assembly) division. The individual reads which make up the assembly should be submitted to dbEST, the Trace archive or the Short Read Archive (SRA) prior to the submission of the assemblies.
The Atlantic Canada Conservation Data Centre (ACCDC) maintains comprehensive lists of plant and animal species. The Atlantic CDC has geo-located records of species occurrences and records of extremely rare to uncommon species in the Atlantic region, including New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, Newfoundland, and Labrador. The Atlantic CDC also maintains biological and other types of data in a variety of linked databases.
TreeBASE is a repository of phylogenetic information, specifically user-submitted phylogenetic trees and the data used to generate them. TreeBASE accepts all types of phylogenetic data (e.g., trees of species, trees of populations, trees of genes) representing all biotic taxa. Data in TreeBASE are exposed to the public if they are used in a publication that is in press or published in a peer-reviewed scientific journal, book, conference proceedings, or thesis. Data used in publications that are in preparation or in review can be submitted to TreeBASE but are only available to the authors, publication editors, or reviewers using a special access code.
Species included in PlantTFDB 4.0 covers the main lineages of green plants. Therefore, PlantTFDB provides genomic TF repertoires across Viridiplantae. To provide comprehensive information for the TF family, a brief introduction and key references are presented for each family. Comprehensive annotations are made for each identified TF, including functional domains, 3D structures, gene ontology (GO), plant ontology (PO), expression information, expert-curated functional description, regulation information, interaction, conserved elements, references, and annotations in various databases such as UniProt, RefSeq, TransFac, STRING, and VISTA. By inferring orthologous groups and constructing phylogenetic trees, evolutionary relationships among identified TFs were inferred. In addition, PlantTFDB has a simple and user-friendly interface to allow users to query based on combined conditions or make sequence similarity search using BLAST.
Chinese Crop Germplasm Resources Information System provides germplasm resources and genetic information for crops including grains, fruits, vegetables, oilseeds, and fibers. The data includes crop fingerprint and DNA sequence data.
The objective of this Research Coordination Network project is to develop an international network of researchers who use genetic methodologies to study the ecology and evolution of marine organisms in the Indo-Pacific to share data, ideas and methods. DIPnet was created to advance genetic diversity research in the Indo-Pacific by aggregating population genetic metadata into a searchable database (GeOME).
The Maize Genetics and Genomics Database focuses on collecting data related to the crop plant and model organism Zea mays. The project's goals are to synthesize, display, and provide access to maize genomics and genetics data, prioritizing mutant and phenotype data and tools, structural and genetic map sets, and gene models. MaizeGDB also aims to make the Maize Newsletter available, and provide support services to the community of maize researchers. MaizeGDB is working with the Schnable lab, the Panzea project, The Genome Reference Consortium, and iPlant Collaborative to create a plan for archiving, dessiminating, visualizing, and analyzing diversity data. MMaizeGDB is short for Maize Genetics/Genomics Database. It is a USDA/ARS funded project to integrate the data found in MaizeDB and ZmDB into a single schema, develop an effective interface to access this data, and develop additional tools to make data analysis easier. Our goal in the long term is a true next-generation online maize database.aize genetics and genomics database.
The CBIF provides primary data on biological species of interest to Canadians. CBIF supports a wide range of social and economic decisions including efforts to conserve our biodiversity in healthy ecosystems, use our biological resources in sustainable ways, and monitor and control pests and diseases. Tools provided by the CBIF include the Integrated Taxonomic Information System (ITIS), Species Access Network, Online Mapping, and the SpeciesBank, including Butterflies of Canada. The CBIF is a member of the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF).
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"IndExs" is a database comprising information on titles, abbreviations and bibliography of exsiccatae. Exsiccatae are defined as "published, uniform, numbered sets of preserved specimens distributed with printed labels" (Pfister 1985). Please note that there are two similar latin terms: "exsiccata, ae" is feminine and used for a set of dried specimens as defined above, whereas the term "exsiccatum, i" is neutral and used for dried specimens in general. You may search "IndExs" using title, part of the title, editor and group of organisms alone or combined. The single search result gives you an unique identifier of the series and all bibliographically important information on the series: the editor(s), title in its bibliographical correct form, standardized abbreviation of the series as to cite in specimen lists of scientific papers, the place of publication and the group(s) of organisms distributed. Additionally, the first and last number of the series as well as the corresponding year of the first and last issue are mentioned. Where preceding and / or superseding series do exist this information is linked. The database also provides access to information about the presence of the series in the herbarium M. As exsiccatae in M are not kept as bibliographically distinct units, but included in the general collections, this indication does not tell anything about the completeness of the set in M. If available, for each series one examplary label is added as image to give layout information. The images are from material located in the herbaria M (the majority), ASU, B, BM, BOUM, BR, BRIX, BUCM, CUP, DR, E, FR, G, GOET, GZU, H, HAL, IB, IBF, JE, K, KR, LD, MO, MSB, NMW, PRC, S, STU, TU, UC, UPS and several others.
Ag Data Commons (ADC) provides access to a wide variety of open data relevant to agricultural research. We are a centralized repository for data already on the web, as well as for new data being published for the first time. While compliance with the U.S. Federal public access and open data directives is important, we aim to surpass them. Our goal is that ADC will foster innovative data re-use, integration, and visualization to support bigger, better science and policy.
In the framework of the Collaborative Research Centre/Transregio 32 ‘Patterns in Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Systems: Monitoring, Modelling, and Data Assimilation’ (CRC/TR32,, funded by the German Research Foundation from 2007 to 2018, a RDM system was self-designed and implemented. The so-called CRC/TR32 project database (TR32DB, is operating online since early 2008. The TR32DB handles all data including metadata, which are created by the involved project participants from several institutions (e.g. Universities of Cologne, Bonn, Aachen, and the Research Centre Jülich) and research fields (e.g. soil and plant sciences, hydrology, geography, geophysics, meteorology, remote sensing). The data is resulting from several field measurement campaigns, meteorological monitoring, remote sensing, laboratory studies and modelling approaches. Furthermore, outcomes of the scientists such as publications, conference contributions, PhD reports and corresponding images are collected in the TR32DB.
The database MORPHYLL contains quantitative and qualitative morphometric data of fossil angiosperm leaves from the Paleogene. The data are compiled from different fossil sites housed in various European Natural History Museums.
MetaCrop is a database that summarizes diverse information about metabolic pathways in crop plants and allows automatic export of information for the creation of detailed metabolic models. MetaCrop is a database that contains manually curated, highly detailed information about metabolic pathways in crop plants, including location information, transport processes and reaction kinetics.
The Genome database contains annotations and analysis of eukaryotic and prokaryotic genomes, as well as tools that allow users to compare genomes and gene sequences from humans, microbes, plants, viruses and organelles. Users can browse by organism, and view genome maps and protein clusters.
This database serves forest tree scientists by providing online access to hardwood tree genomic and genetic data, including assembled reference genomes, transcriptomes, and genetic mapping information. The web site also provides access to tools for mining and visualization of these data sets, including BLAST for comparing sequences, Jbrowse for browsing genomes, Apollo for community annotation and Expression Analysis to build gene expression heatmaps.