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Found 41 result(s)
The Bavarian Natural History Collections (Staatliche Naturwissenschaftliche Sammlungen Bayerns, SNSB) are a research institution for natural history in Bavaria. They encompass five State Collections (zoology, botany, paleontology and geology, mineralogy, anthropology and paleoanatomy), the Botanical Garden Munich-Nymphenburg and eight museums with public exhibitions in Munich, Bamberg, Bayreuth, Eichstätt and Nördlingen. Our research focuses mainly on the past and present bio- and geodiversity and the evolution of animals and plants. To achieve this we have large scientific collections (almost 35,000,000 specimens). Collections and museums also play an instrumental role in public and academic education.
ICRISAT performs crop improvement research, using conventional as well as methods derived from biotechnology, on the following crops: Chickpea, Pigeonpea, Groundnut, Pearl millet,Sorghum and Small millets. ICRISAT's data repository collects, preserves and facilitates access to the datasets produced by ICRISAT researchers to all users who are interested in. Data includes Phenotypic, Genotypic, Social Science, and Spatial data, Soil and Weather.
The Expression Atlas provides information on gene expression patterns under different biological conditions such as a gene knock out, a plant treated with a compound, or in a particular organism part or cell. It includes both microarray and RNA-seq data. The data is re-analysed in-house to detect interesting expression patterns under the conditions of the original experiment. There are two components to the Expression Atlas, the Baseline Atlas and the Differential Atlas. The Baseline Atlas displays information about which gene products are present (and at what abundance) in "normal" conditions (e.g. tissue, cell type). It aims to answer questions such as "which genes are specifically expressed in human kidney?". This component of the Expression Atlas consists of highly-curated and quality-checked RNA-seq experiments from ArrayExpress. It has data for many different animal and plant species. New experiments are added as they become available. The Differential Atlas allows users to identify genes that are up- or down-regulated in a wide variety of different experimental conditions such as yeast mutants, cadmium treated plants, cystic fibrosis or the effect on gene expression of mind-body practice. Both microarray and RNA-seq experiments are included in the Differential Atlas. Experiments are selected from ArrayExpress and groups of samples are manually identified for comparison e.g. those with wild type genotype compared to those with a gene knock out. Each experiment is processed through our in-house differential expression statistical analysis pipeline to identify genes with a high probability of differential expression.
The Plant Metabolic Network (PMN) provides a broad network of plant metabolic pathway databases that contain curated information from the literature and computational analyses about the genes, enzymes, compounds, reactions, and pathways involved in primary and secondary metabolism in plants. The PMN currently houses one multi-species reference database called PlantCyc and 22 species/taxon-specific databases.
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CPLM (Compendium of Protein Lysine Modifications) is an online data resource specifically designed for protein lysine modifications (PLMs). The CPLM database was extended and adapted from our CPLA 1.0 (Compendium of Protein Lysine Acetylation) database and the 2.0 release contains 203,972 modification events on 189,919 modified lysines in 45,748 proteins for 12 types of PLMs, including Nε-lysine acetylation, ubiquitination, methylation, sumoylation, glycation, butyrylation, crotonylation, malonylation, propionylation, succinylation, phosphoglycerylation and prokaryotic Pupylation.
VertNet is a NSF-funded collaborative project that makes biodiversity data free and available on the web. VertNet is a tool designed to help people discover, capture, and publish biodiversity data. It is also the core of a collaboration between hundreds of biocollections that contribute biodiversity data and work together to improve it. VertNet is an engine for training current and future professionals to use and build upon best practices in data quality, curation, research, and data publishing. Yet, VertNet is still the aggregate of all of the information that it mobilizes. To us, VertNet is all of these things and more.
The Maize Genetics and Genomics Database focuses on collecting data related to the crop plant and model organism Zea mays. The project's goals are to synthesize, display, and provide access to maize genomics and genetics data, prioritizing mutant and phenotype data and tools, structural and genetic map sets, and gene models. MaizeGDB also aims to make the Maize Newsletter available, and provide support services to the community of maize researchers. MaizeGDB is working with the Schnable lab, the Panzea project, The Genome Reference Consortium, and iPlant Collaborative to create a plan for archiving, dessiminating, visualizing, and analyzing diversity data. MMaizeGDB is short for Maize Genetics/Genomics Database. It is a USDA/ARS funded project to integrate the data found in MaizeDB and ZmDB into a single schema, develop an effective interface to access this data, and develop additional tools to make data analysis easier. Our goal in the long term is a true next-generation online maize database.aize genetics and genomics database.
The CBIF provides primary data on biological species of interest to Canadians. CBIF supports a wide range of social and economic decisions including efforts to conserve our biodiversity in healthy ecosystems, use our biological resources in sustainable ways, and monitor and control pests and diseases. Tools provided by the CBIF include the Integrated Taxonomic Information System (ITIS), Species Access Network, Online Mapping, and the SpeciesBank, including Butterflies of Canada. The CBIF is a member of the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF).
Antarctic marine and terrestrial biodiversity data is widely scattered, patchy and often not readily accessible. In many cases the data is in danger of being irretrievably lost. Biodiversity.aq establishes and supports a distributed system of interoperable databases, giving easy access through a single internet portal to a set of resources relevant to research, conservation and management pertaining to Antarctic biodiversity. biodiversity.aq provides access to both marine and terrestrial Antarctic biodiversity data.
The Consortium of Pacific Herbaria (CPH) supports the enhancement of research cyberinfrastructure within Hawai'i and the Pacific basin for implementing shared specimen data hosting of plant specimens. The CPH network is a regional node of the US Virtual Herbarium.
The Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD) provides comprehensive integrated biological information for the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae along with search and analysis tools to explore these data, enabling the discovery of functional relationships between sequence and gene products in fungi and higher organisms.
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e!DAL stands for electronic Data Archive Library. It is a lightweight open source software software framework for publishing and sharing research data. e!DAL was developed based on experiences coming from decades of research data management and has grown towards being a general data archiving and publication infrastructure [doi:10.1186/1471-2105-15-214]. First research data repository is "Plant Genomics and Phenomics Research Data Repository".
iHUB is a collaborative environment that supports research that relate to the genes and gene networks that control the ionomes, mineral nutrient, and trace element compositions of tissues and organisms. It provides tools to share data, literature, and coordinating collection efforts, among others. It contains ionomic data on more than 200.000 samples.
The KNB Data Repository is an international repository intended to facilitate ecological, environmental and earth science research in the broadest senses. For scientists, the KNB Data Repository is an efficient way to share, discover, access and interpret complex ecological, environmental, earth science, and sociological data and the software used to create and manage those data. Due to rich contextual information provided with data in the KNB, scientists are able to integrate and analyze data with less effort. The data originate from a highly-distributed set of field stations, laboratories, research sites, and individual researchers. The KNB supports rich, detailed metadata to promote data discovery as well as automated and manual integration of data into new projects. The KNB supports a rich set of modern repository services, including the ability to assign Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) so data sets can be confidently referenced in any publication, the ability to track the versions of datasets as they evolve through time, and metadata to establish the provenance relationships between source and derived data.
The Arctic Data Center is the primary data and software repository for the Arctic section of NSF Polar Programs. The Center helps the research community to reproducibly preserve and discover all products of NSF-funded research in the Arctic, including data, metadata, software, documents, and provenance that links these together. The repository is open to contributions from NSF Arctic investigators, and data are released under an open license (CC-BY, CC0, depending on the choice of the contributor). All science, engineering, and education research supported by the NSF Arctic research program are included, such as Natural Sciences (Geoscience, Earth Science, Oceanography, Ecology, Atmospheric Science, Biology, etc.) and Social Sciences (Archeology, Anthropology, Social Science, etc.). Key to the initiative is the partnership between NCEAS at UC Santa Barbara, DataONE, and NOAA’s NCEI, each of which bring critical capabilities to the Center. Infrastructure from the successful NSF-sponsored DataONE federation of data repositories enables data replication to NCEI, providing both offsite and institutional diversity that are critical to long term preservation.
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In the framework of an initiative to advance biodiversity research in Germany, we established three exemplary large-scale and long-term research sites (funded by the German Research Foundation). They are termed Biodiversity Exploratories, in contrast to mainly descriptive observatories. The exploratories sustain the scientific infrastructure to develop the intellectual framework needed to address critical questions about changes in biodiversity and to evaluate the impacts of those changes for ecosystem processes. Thus, in the exploratories biodiversity and ecosystem research will be merged at a large scale and with a long-term perspective. In the first phase 2006-09 the exploratories addressed the relationship between land-use intensity, biodiversity change, and ecosystem functioning for selected taxa. In 2008 the exploratories integrated further contributing projects proposed by the German research community. Thus, the biodiversity exploratories serve as a stimulating research platform for the whole German biodiversity research community. Comprehensive data are collected for about ten years: In the Hainich, in the Swabian Alb and in the Schorfheide scientist examining from all over Germany Biodiversity and analyze ecosystem processes. Computer scientists from the University of Jena now publish first data from the Biodiversity exploratories on internet, to make it so for further research available.
The USGS Alaska Region has the largest geographic extent of the seven regional units within the USGS and represents a dynamic landscape of great natural wonder. It is a transforming landscape shaped by volcanoes, earthquakes, major rivers, and glaciers and a strategic landscape of yet untapped mineral and energy resources. The Region conducts research to help inform management of the extensive national parks and wildlife refuges of the far north and the international birds, fish, and marine mammals that migrate to these lands and waters; informs national Arctic energy policy through research on the National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska and the U.S. Outer Continental Shelf; and provides science to understand, help respond to and mitigate impacts from natural hazards. This work is accomplished in part by the Region's two Science Centers headquartered in Anchorage, the Alaska Science Center and the Volcano Science Center.
The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute is a charitably funded genomic research centre located in Hinxton, nine miles south of Cambridge in the UK. We study diseases that have an impact on health globally by investigating genomes. Building on our past achievements and based on priorities that exploit the unique expertise of our Faculty of researchers, we will lead global efforts to understand the biology of genomes. We are convinced of the importance of making this research available and accessible for all audiences. reduce global health burdens.
Biological collections are replete with taxonomic, geographic, temporal, numerical, and historical information. This information is crucial for understanding and properly managing biodiversity and ecosystems, but is often difficult to access. Canadensys, operated from the Université de Montréal Biodiversity Centre, is a Canada-wide effort to unlock the biodiversity information held in biological collections.
TreeGenes is a genomic, phenotypic, and environmental data resource for forest tree species. The TreeGenes database and Dendrome project provide custom informatics tools to manage the flood of information.The database contains several curated modules that support the storage of data and provide the foundation for web-based searches and visualization tools. GMOD GUI tools such as CMAP for genetic maps and GBrowse for genome and transcriptome assemblies are implemented here. A sample tracking system, known as the Forest Tree Genetic Stock Center, sits at the forefront of most large-scale projects. Barcode identifiers assigned to the trees during sample collection are maintained in the database to identify an individual through DNA extraction, resequencing, genotyping and phenotyping. DiversiTree, a user-friendly desktop-style interface, queries the TreeGenes database and is designed for bulk retrieval of resequencing data. CartograTree combines geo-referenced individuals with relevant ecological and trait databases in a user-friendly map-based interface. ---- The Conifer Genome Network (CGN) is a virtual nexus for researchers working in conifer genomics. The CGN web site is maintained by the Dendrome Project at the University of California, Davis.
SoyBase is a professionally curated repository for genetics, genomics and related data resources for soybean. It contains current genetic, physical and genomic sequence maps integrated with qualitative and quantitative traits. SoyBase includes annotated "Williams 82" genomic sequence and associated data mining tools. The repository maintains controlled vocabularies for soybean growth, development, and traits that are linked to more general plant ontologies.
The Fungal Genetics Stock Center has preserved and distributed strains of genetically characterized fungi since 1960. The collection includes over 20,000 accessioned strains of classical and genetically engineered mutants of key model, human, and plant pathogenic fungi. These materials are distributed as living stocks to researchers around the world.
The Paleobiology Database (PaleoBioDB) is a non-governmental, non-profit public resource for paleontological data. It has been organized and operated by a multi-disciplinary, multi-institutional, international group of paleobiological researchers. Its purpose is to provide global, collection-based occurrence and taxonomic data for organisms of all geological ages, as well data services to allow easy access to data for independent development of analytical tools, visualization software, and applications of all types. The Database’s broader goal is to encourage and enable data-driven collaborative efforts that address large-scale paleobiological questions.