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Found 79 result(s)
The Structure database provides three-dimensional structures of macromolecules for a variety of research purposes and allows the user to retrieve structures for specific molecule types as well as structures for genes and proteins of interest. Three main databases comprise Structure-The Molecular Modeling Database; Conserved Domains and Protein Classification; and the BioSystems Database. Structure also links to the PubChem databases to connect biological activity data to the macromolecular structures. Users can locate structural templates for proteins and interactively view structures and sequence data to closely examine sequence-structure relationships.
Reactome is a manually curated, peer-reviewed pathway database, annotated by expert biologists and cross-referenced to bioinformatics databases. Its aim is to share information in the visual representations of biological pathways in a computationally accessible format. Pathway annotations are authored by expert biologists, in collaboration with Reactome editorial staff and cross-referenced to many bioinformatics databases. These include NCBI Gene, Ensembl and UniProt databases, the UCSC and HapMap Genome Browsers, the KEGG Compound and ChEBI small molecule databases, PubMed, and Gene Ontology.
STRING is a database of known and predicted protein interactions. The interactions include direct (physical) and indirect (functional) associations; they are derived from four sources: - Genomic Context - High-throughput Experiments - (Conserved) Coexpression - Previous Knowledge STRING quantitatively integrates interaction data from these sources for a large number of organisms, and transfers information between these organisms where applicable.
CBS offers Comprehensive public databases of DNA- and protein sequences, macromolecular structure, g ene and protein expression levels, pathway organization and cell signalling, have been established to optimise scientific exploitation of the explosion of data within biology. Unlike many other groups in the field of biomolecular informatics, Center for Biological Sequence Analysis directs its research primarily towards topics related to the elucidation of the functional aspects of complex biological mechanisms. Among contemporary bioinformatics concerns are reliable computational interpretation of a wide range of experimental data, and the detailed understanding of the molecular apparatus behind cellular mechanisms of sequence information. By exploiting available experimental data and evidence in the design of algorithms, sequence correlations and other features of biological significance can be inferred. In addition to the computational research the center also has experimental efforts in gene expression analysis using DNA chips and data generation in relation to the physical and structural properties of DNA. In the last decade, the Center for Biological Sequence Analysis has produced a large number of computational methods, which are offered to others via WWW servers.
ToxoDB is a genome database for the genus Toxoplasma, a set of single-celled eukaryotic pathogens that cause human and animal diseases, including toxoplasmosis.
dbEST is a division of GenBank that contains sequence data and other information on "single-pass" cDNA sequences, or "Expressed Sequence Tags", from a number of organisms. Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) are short (usually about 300-500 bp), single-pass sequence reads from mRNA (cDNA). Typically they are produced in large batches. They represent a snapshot of genes expressed in a given tissue and/or at a given developmental stage. They are tags (some coding, others not) of expression for a given cDNA library. Most EST projects develop large numbers of sequences. These are commonly submitted to GenBank and dbEST as batches of dozens to thousands of entries, with a great deal of redundancy in the citation, submitter and library information. To improve the efficiency of the submission process for this type of data, we have designed a special streamlined submission process and data format. dbEST also includes sequences that are longer than the traditional ESTs, or are produced as single sequences or in small batches. Among these sequences are products of differential display experiments and RACE experiments. The thing that these sequences have in common with traditional ESTs, regardless of length, quality, or quantity, is that there is little information that can be annotated in the record. If a sequence is later characterized and annotated with biological features such as a coding region, 5'UTR, or 3'UTR, it should be submitted through the regular GenBank submissions procedure (via BankIt or Sequin), even if part of the sequence is already in dbEST. dbEST is reserved for single-pass reads. Assembled sequences should not be submitted to dbEST. GenBank will accept assembled EST submissions for the forthcoming TSA (Transcriptome Shotgun Assembly) division. The individual reads which make up the assembly should be submitted to dbEST, the Trace archive or the Short Read Archive (SRA) prior to the submission of the assemblies.
The HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee (HGNC) assigned unique gene symbols and names to over 35,000 human loci, of which around 19,000 are protein coding. This curated online repository of HGNC-approved gene nomenclature and associated resources includes links to genomic, proteomic and phenotypic information, as well as dedicated gene family pages.
The Database of Genomic Variants archive provides curated archiving and distribution of publicly available genomic structural variants. Direct submissions are accepted as well as published data. The DGVa is the primary supplier of data to the Database of Genomic Variants (DGV) (hosted by The Centre for Applied Genomics in Toronto, Canada).
BRENDA is the main collection of enzyme functional data available to the scientific community worldwide. The enzymes are classified according to the Enzyme Commission list of enzymes. It is available free of charge for via the internet ( and as an in-house database for commercial users (requests to our distributor Biobase). The enzymes are classified according to the Enzyme Commission list of enzymes. Some 5000 "different" enzymes are covered. Frequently enzymes with very different properties are included under the same EC number. BRENDA includes biochemical and molecular information on classification, nomenclature, reaction, specificity, functional parameters, occurrence, enzyme structure, application, engineering, stability, disease, isolation, and preparation. The database also provides additional information on ligands, which function as natural or in vitro substrates/products, inhibitors, activating compounds, cofactors, bound metals, and other attributes.
The UniProt Knowledgebase (UniProtKB) is the central hub for the collection of functional information on proteins, with accurate, consistent and rich annotation. In addition to capturing the core data mandatory for each UniProtKB entry (mainly, the amino acid sequence, protein name or description, taxonomic data and citation information), as much annotation information as possible is added. This includes widely accepted biological ontologies, classifications and cross-references, and clear indications of the quality of annotation in the form of evidence attribution of experimental and computational data. The Universal Protein Resource (UniProt) is a comprehensive resource for protein sequence and annotation data. The UniProt databases are the UniProt Knowledgebase (UniProtKB), the UniProt Reference Clusters (UniRef), and the UniProt Archive (UniParc). The UniProt Metagenomic and Environmental Sequences (UniMES) database is a repository specifically developed for metagenomic and environmental data. The UniProt Knowledgebase,is an expertly and richly curated protein database, consisting of two sections called UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot and UniProtKB/TrEMBL.
FungiDB belongs to the EuPathDB family of databases and is an integrated genomic and functional genomic database for the kingdom Fungi. FungiDB was first released in early 2011 as a collaborative project between EuPathDB and the group of Jason Stajich (University of California, Riverside). At the end of 2015, FungiDB was integrated into the EuPathDB bioinformatic resource center. FungiDB integrates whole genome sequence and annotation and also includes experimental and environmental isolate sequence data. The database includes comparative genomics, analysis of gene expression, and supplemental bioinformatics analyses and a web interface for data-mining.
The WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network (WWARN) is a collaborative platform generating innovative resources and reliable evidence to inform the malaria community on the factors affecting the efficacy of antimalarial medicines. Access to data is provided through diverse Tools and Resources: WWARN Explorer, Molecular Surveyor K13 Methodology, Molecular Surveyor pfmdr1 & pfcrt, Molecular Surveyor dhfr & dhps.
The European Variation Archive is an open-access database of all types of genetic variation data from all species. The EVA provides access to highly detailed, granular, raw variant data from human, with other species to follow.
Launched in 2000, WormBase is an international consortium of biologists and computer scientists dedicated to providing the research community with accurate, current, accessible information concerning the genetics, genomics and biology of C. elegans and some related nematodes. In addition to their curation work, all sites have ongoing programs in bioinformatics research to develop the next generations of WormBase structure, content and accessibility
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Since the first discovery of RNA pseudoknots more and many more pseudoknots have been found. However, not all of those pseudoknot data are easy to trace. Sometimes the information is hidden in a publication where the title gives no hint that pseudoknot information is there. This was the first reason that we thought that a general accessible information source for pseudoknots would be handy.
Project Achilles is a systematic effort aimed at identifying and cataloging genetic vulnerabilities across hundreds of genomically characterized cancer cell lines. The project uses genome-wide genetic perturbation reagents (shRNAs or Cas9/sgRNAs) to silence or knock-out individual genes and identify those genes that affect cell survival. Large-scale functional screening of cancer cell lines provides a complementary approach to those studies that aim to characterize the molecular alterations (e.g. mutations, copy number alterations) of primary tumors, such as The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). The overall goal of the project is to identify cancer genetic dependencies and link them to molecular characteristics in order to prioritize targets for therapeutic development and identify the patient population that might benefit from such targets.
Xenbase's mission is to provide the international research community with a comprehensive, integrated and easy to use web based resource that gives access the diverse and rich genomic, expression and functional data available from Xenopus research. Xenbase also provides a critical data sharing infrastructure for many other NIH-funded projects, and is a focal point for the Xenopus community. In addition to our primary goal of supporting Xenopus researchers, Xenbase enhances the availability and visibility of Xenopus data to the broader biomedical research community.
The Database of Protein Disorder (DisProt) is a curated database that provides information about proteins that lack fixed 3D structure in their putatively native states, either in their entirety or in part. DisProt is a community resource annotating protein sequences for intrinsically disorder regions from the literature. It classifies intrinsic disorder based on experimental methods and three ontologies for molecular function, transition and binding partner.
IntEnz contains the recommendation of the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology on the nomenclature and classification of enzyme-catalyzed reactions. Users can browse by enzyme classification or use advanced search options to search enzymes by class, subclass and sub-subclass information.
EBI's CSA contains data documenting enzyme active sites and catalytic residues in enzymes of 3D structure. Entries in CSA may be original hand-annotated entries from primary literature or homologous entries found by PSI-BLAST alignment.
jPOSTrepo (Japan ProteOme STandard Repository) is a repository of sharing MS raw/processed data. It consists of a high-speed file upload process, flexible file management system and easy-to-use interfaces. Users can release their "raw/processed" data via this site with a unique identifier number for the paper publication. Users also can suspend (or "embargo") their data until their paper is published. The file transfer from users’ computer to our repository server is very fast (roughly ten times faster than usual file transfer) and uses only web browsers – it does not require installing any additional software.
BioPortal is an open repository of biomedical ontologies, a service that provides access to those ontologies, and a set of tools for working with them. BioPortal provides a wide range of such tools, either directly via the BioPortal web site, or using the BioPortal web service REST API. BioPortal also includes community features for adding notes, reviews, and even mappings to specific ontologies. BioPortal has four major product components: the web application; the API services; widgets, or applets, that can be installed on your own site; and a Virtual Appliance version that is available for download or through Amazon Web Services machine instance (AMI). There is also a beta release SPARQL endpoint.