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Found 9 result(s)
The PRIDE PRoteomics IDEntifications database is a centralized, standards compliant, public data repository for proteomics data, including protein and peptide identifications, post-translational modifications and supporting spectral evidence. PRIDE encourages and welcomes direct user submissions of mass spectrometry data to be published in peer-reviewed publications.
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jPOSTrepo (Japan ProteOme STandard Repository) is a repository of sharing MS raw/processed data. It consists of a high-speed file upload process, flexible file management system and easy-to-use interfaces. Users can release their "raw/processed" data via this site with a unique identifier number for the paper publication. Users also can suspend (or "embargo") their data until their paper is published. The file transfer from users’ computer to our repository server is very fast (roughly ten times faster than usual file transfer) and uses only web browsers – it does not require installing any additional software.
Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD) has been established by a team of biologists, bioinformaticists and software engineers. This is a joint project between the PandeyLab at Johns Hopkins University, and Institute of Bioinformatics, Bangalore. HPRD is a definitive repository of human proteins. This database should serve as a ready reckoner for researchers in their quest for drug discovery, identification of disease markers and promote biomedical research in general. Human Proteinpedia (www.humanproteinpedia.org) is its associated data portal.
The ProteomeXchange consortium has been set up to provide a single point of submission of MS proteomics data to the main existing proteomics repositories, and to encourage the data exchange between them for optimal data dissemination. Current members accepting submissions are: The PRIDE PRoteomics IDEntifications database at the European Bioinformatics Institute focusing mainly on shotgun mass spectrometry proteomics data PeptideAtlas/PASSEL focusing on SRM/MRM datasets.
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MaxQB stores and displays collections of large proteomics projects and allows joint analysis and comparison. As a first dataset is contains proteome data of 11 different human cell lines. The 11 cell line proteomes together identify proteins expressed from more than half of all human genes. For each protein of interest, expression levels estimated by label-free quantification can be visualized across the cell lines. Similarly, the expression rank order and estimated amount of each protein within each proteome are plotted.
The CPTAC Data Portal is the centralized repository for the dissemination of proteomic data collected by the Proteome Characterization Centers (PCCs) for the CPTAC program. The portal also hosts analyses of the mass spectrometry data (mapping of spectra to peptide sequences and protein identification) from the PCCs and from a CPTAC-sponsored common data analysis pipeline (CDAP).
With the creation of the Metabolomics Data Repository managed by Data Repository and Coordination Center (DRCC), the NIH acknowledges the importance of data sharing for metabolomics. Metabolomics represents the systematic study of low molecular weight molecules found in a biological sample, providing a "snapshot" of the current and actual state of the cell or organism at a specific point in time. Thus, the metabolome represents the functional activity of biological systems. As with other ‘omics’, metabolites are conserved across animals, plants and microbial species, facilitating the extrapolation of research findings in laboratory animals to humans. Common technologies for measuring the metabolome include mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), which can measure hundreds to thousands of unique chemical entities. Data sharing in metabolomics will include primary raw data and the biological and analytical meta-data necessary to interpret these data. Through cooperation between investigators, metabolomics laboratories and data coordinating centers, these data sets should provide a rich resource for the research community to enhance preclinical, clinical and translational research.
The Yeast Resource Center provides access to data about mass spectrometry, yeast two-hybrid arrays, deconvolution florescence microscopy, protein structure prediction and computational biology. These services are provided to further the goal of a complete understanding of the chemical interactions required for the maintenance and faithful reproduction of a living cell. The observation that the fundamental biological processes of yeast are conserved among all eukaryotes ensures that this knowledge will shape and advance our understanding of living systems.