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Found 59 result(s)
The UniProt Knowledgebase (UniProtKB) is the central hub for the collection of functional information on proteins, with accurate, consistent and rich annotation. In addition to capturing the core data mandatory for each UniProtKB entry (mainly, the amino acid sequence, protein name or description, taxonomic data and citation information), as much annotation information as possible is added. This includes widely accepted biological ontologies, classifications and cross-references, and clear indications of the quality of annotation in the form of evidence attribution of experimental and computational data. The Universal Protein Resource (UniProt) is a comprehensive resource for protein sequence and annotation data. The UniProt databases are the UniProt Knowledgebase (UniProtKB), the UniProt Reference Clusters (UniRef), and the UniProt Archive (UniParc). The UniProt Metagenomic and Environmental Sequences (UniMES) database is a repository specifically developed for metagenomic and environmental data. The UniProt Knowledgebase,is an expertly and richly curated protein database, consisting of two sections called UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot and UniProtKB/TrEMBL.
FungiDB belongs to the EuPathDB family of databases and is an integrated genomic and functional genomic database for the kingdom Fungi. FungiDB was first released in early 2011 as a collaborative project between EuPathDB and the group of Jason Stajich (University of California, Riverside). At the end of 2015, FungiDB was integrated into the EuPathDB bioinformatic resource center. FungiDB integrates whole genome sequence and annotation and also includes experimental and environmental isolate sequence data. The database includes comparative genomics, analysis of gene expression, and supplemental bioinformatics analyses and a web interface for data-mining.
The WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network (WWARN) is a collaborative platform generating innovative resources and reliable evidence to inform the malaria community on the factors affecting the efficacy of antimalarial medicines. Access to data is provided through diverse Tools and Resources: WWARN Explorer, Molecular Surveyor K13 Methodology, Molecular Surveyor pfmdr1 & pfcrt, Molecular Surveyor dhfr & dhps.
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BRENDA is the main collection of enzyme functional data available to the scientific community worldwide. The enzymes are classified according to the Enzyme Commission list of enzymes. It is available free of charge for via the internet (http://www.brenda-enzymes.org/) and as an in-house database for commercial users (requests to our distributor Biobase). The enzymes are classified according to the Enzyme Commission list of enzymes. Some 5000 "different" enzymes are covered. Frequently enzymes with very different properties are included under the same EC number. BRENDA includes biochemical and molecular information on classification, nomenclature, reaction, specificity, functional parameters, occurrence, enzyme structure, application, engineering, stability, disease, isolation, and preparation. The database also provides additional information on ligands, which function as natural or in vitro substrates/products, inhibitors, activating compounds, cofactors, bound metals, and other attributes.
dbEST is a division of GenBank that contains sequence data and other information on "single-pass" cDNA sequences, or "Expressed Sequence Tags", from a number of organisms. Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) are short (usually about 300-500 bp), single-pass sequence reads from mRNA (cDNA). Typically they are produced in large batches. They represent a snapshot of genes expressed in a given tissue and/or at a given developmental stage. They are tags (some coding, others not) of expression for a given cDNA library. Most EST projects develop large numbers of sequences. These are commonly submitted to GenBank and dbEST as batches of dozens to thousands of entries, with a great deal of redundancy in the citation, submitter and library information. To improve the efficiency of the submission process for this type of data, we have designed a special streamlined submission process and data format. dbEST also includes sequences that are longer than the traditional ESTs, or are produced as single sequences or in small batches. Among these sequences are products of differential display experiments and RACE experiments. The thing that these sequences have in common with traditional ESTs, regardless of length, quality, or quantity, is that there is little information that can be annotated in the record. If a sequence is later characterized and annotated with biological features such as a coding region, 5'UTR, or 3'UTR, it should be submitted through the regular GenBank submissions procedure (via BankIt or Sequin), even if part of the sequence is already in dbEST. dbEST is reserved for single-pass reads. Assembled sequences should not be submitted to dbEST. GenBank will accept assembled EST submissions for the forthcoming TSA (Transcriptome Shotgun Assembly) division. The individual reads which make up the assembly should be submitted to dbEST, the Trace archive or the Short Read Archive (SRA) prior to the submission of the assemblies.
The Database of Genomic Variants archive provides curated archiving and distribution of publicly available genomic structural variants. Direct submissions are accepted as well as published data. The DGVa is the primary supplier of data to the Database of Genomic Variants (DGV) (hosted by The Centre for Applied Genomics in Toronto, Canada).
The HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee (HGNC) assigned unique gene symbols and names to over 35,000 human loci, of which around 19,000 are protein coding. This curated online repository of HGNC-approved gene nomenclature and associated resources includes links to genomic, proteomic and phenotypic information, as well as dedicated gene family pages.
This project is an open invitation to anyone and everyone to participate in a decentralized effort to explore the opportunities of open science in neuroimaging. We aim to document how much (scientific) value can be generated from a data release — from the publication of scientific findings derived from this dataset, algorithms and methods evaluated on this dataset, and/or extensions of this dataset by acquisition and incorporation of new data. The project involves the processing of acoustic stimuli. In this study, the scientists have demonstrated an audiodescription of classic "Forrest Gump" to subjects, while researchers using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have captured the brain activity of test candidates in the processing of language, music, emotions, memories and pictorial representations.In collaboration with various labs in Magdeburg we acquired and published what is probably the most comprehensive sample of brain activation patterns of natural language processing. Volunteers listened to a two-hour audio movie version of the Hollywood feature film "Forrest Gump" in a 7T MRI scanner. High-resolution brain activation patterns and physiological measurements were recorded continuously. These data have been placed into the public domain, and are freely available to the scientific community and the general public.
Human Proteinpedia is a community portal for sharing and integration of human protein data. This is a joint project between Pandey at Johns Hopkins University, and Institute of Bioinformatics, Bangalore. This portal allows research laboratories around the world to contribute and maintain protein annotations. Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD) integrates data, that is deposited in Human Proteinpedia along with the existing literature curated information in the context of an individual protein. All the public data contributed to Human Proteinpedia can be queried, viewed and downloaded. Data pertaining to post-translational modifications, protein interactions, tissue expression, expression in cell lines, subcellular localization and enzyme substrate relationships may be deposited.
CorrDB has data of cattle, relating to meat production, milk production, growth, health, and others. This database is designed to collect all published livestock genetic/phenotypic trait correlation data, aimed at facilitating genetic network analysis or systems biology studies.
The European Variation Archive is an open-access database of all types of genetic variation data from all species. The EVA provides access to highly detailed, granular, raw variant data from human, with other species to follow.
The Mouse Tumor Biology (MTB) Database supports the use of the mouse as a model system of hereditary cancer by providing electronic access to: Information on endogenous spontaneous and induced tumors in mice, including tumor frequency & latency data, Information on genetically defined mice (inbred, hybrid, mutant, and genetically engineered strains of mice) in which tumors arise, Information on genetic factors associated with tumor susceptibility in mice and somatic genetic-mutations observed in the tumors, Tumor pathology reports and images, References, supporting MTB data and Links to other online resources for cancer.
The PRIDE PRoteomics IDEntifications database is a centralized, standards compliant, public data repository for proteomics data, including protein and peptide identifications, post-translational modifications and supporting spectral evidence. PRIDE encourages and welcomes direct user submissions of mass spectrometry data to be published in peer-reviewed publications.
Launched in 2000, WormBase is an international consortium of biologists and computer scientists dedicated to providing the research community with accurate, current, accessible information concerning the genetics, genomics and biology of C. elegans and some related nematodes. In addition to their curation work, all sites have ongoing programs in bioinformatics research to develop the next generations of WormBase structure, content and accessibility
ViPR, the Virus Pathogen Resource, is a publicly available, NIAID-sponsored one-stop database and analysis resource that supports the research of viral pathogens in the NIAID Category A-C Priority Pathogen lists and those causing (re)emerging infectious diseases. ViPR integrates data from external sources (GenBank, UniProt, Immune Epitope Database, Protein Data Bank, etc.), direct submissions, and internal curation and analysis pipelines, and provides a suite of bioinformatics analysis and visualization tools to expedite virology research.
Project Achilles is a systematic effort aimed at identifying and cataloging genetic vulnerabilities across hundreds of genomically characterized cancer cell lines. The project uses genome-wide genetic perturbation reagents (shRNAs or Cas9/sgRNAs) to silence or knock-out individual genes and identify those genes that affect cell survival. Large-scale functional screening of cancer cell lines provides a complementary approach to those studies that aim to characterize the molecular alterations (e.g. mutations, copy number alterations) of primary tumors, such as The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). The overall goal of the project is to identify cancer genetic dependencies and link them to molecular characteristics in order to prioritize targets for therapeutic development and identify the patient population that might benefit from such targets.
Xenbase's mission is to provide the international research community with a comprehensive, integrated and easy to use web based resource that gives access the diverse and rich genomic, expression and functional data available from Xenopus research. Xenbase also provides a critical data sharing infrastructure for many other NIH-funded projects, and is a focal point for the Xenopus community. In addition to our primary goal of supporting Xenopus researchers, Xenbase enhances the availability and visibility of Xenopus data to the broader biomedical research community.
IntEnz contains the recommendation of the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology on the nomenclature and classification of enzyme-catalyzed reactions. Users can browse by enzyme classification or use advanced search options to search enzymes by class, subclass and sub-subclass information.
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jPOSTrepo (Japan ProteOme STandard Repository) is a repository of sharing MS raw/processed data. It consists of a high-speed file upload process, flexible file management system and easy-to-use interfaces. Users can release their "raw/processed" data via this site with a unique identifier number for the paper publication. Users also can suspend (or "embargo") their data until their paper is published. The file transfer from users’ computer to our repository server is very fast (roughly ten times faster than usual file transfer) and uses only web browsers – it does not require installing any additional software.
BioModels Database is a repository of peer-reviewed, published, computational models that allows biologists to store, search and retrieve published mathematical models from the field of systems biology, but also more generally those of biological interest. Models in the database can be used to generate sub-models, can be simulated online, and can be converted between different representational formats.