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Found 21 result(s)
The WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network (WWARN) is a collaborative platform generating innovative resources and reliable evidence to inform the malaria community on the factors affecting the efficacy of antimalarial medicines. Access to data is provided through diverse Tools and Resources: WWARN Explorer, Molecular Surveyor K13 Methodology, Molecular Surveyor pfmdr1 & pfcrt, Molecular Surveyor dhfr & dhps.
The European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) has a long-standing mission to collect, organise and make available databases for biomolecular science. It makes available a collection of databases along with tools to search, download and analyse their content. These databases include DNA and protein sequences and structures, genome annotation, gene expression information, molecular interactions and pathways. Connected to these are linking and descriptive data resources such as protein motifs, ontologies and many others. In many of these efforts, the EBI is a European node in global data-sharing agreements involving, for example, the USA and Japan.
GeneCards is a searchable, integrative database that provides comprehensive, user-friendly information on all annotated and predicted human genes. It automatically integrates gene-centric data from ~125 web sources, including genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, genetic, clinical and functional information.
The PRIDE PRoteomics IDEntifications database is a centralized, standards compliant, public data repository for proteomics data, including protein and peptide identifications, post-translational modifications and supporting spectral evidence. PRIDE encourages and welcomes direct user submissions of mass spectrometry data to be published in peer-reviewed publications.
Project Achilles is a systematic effort aimed at identifying and cataloging genetic vulnerabilities across hundreds of genomically characterized cancer cell lines. The project uses genome-wide genetic perturbation reagents (shRNAs or Cas9/sgRNAs) to silence or knock-out individual genes and identify those genes that affect cell survival. Large-scale functional screening of cancer cell lines provides a complementary approach to those studies that aim to characterize the molecular alterations (e.g. mutations, copy number alterations) of primary tumors, such as The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). The overall goal of the project is to identify cancer genetic dependencies and link them to molecular characteristics in order to prioritize targets for therapeutic development and identify the patient population that might benefit from such targets.
Xenbase's mission is to provide the international research community with a comprehensive, integrated and easy to use web based resource that gives access the diverse and rich genomic, expression and functional data available from Xenopus research. Xenbase also provides a critical data sharing infrastructure for many other NIH-funded projects, and is a focal point for the Xenopus community. In addition to our primary goal of supporting Xenopus researchers, Xenbase enhances the availability and visibility of Xenopus data to the broader biomedical research community.
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In the framework of an initiative to advance biodiversity research in Germany, we established three exemplary large-scale and long-term research sites (funded by the German Research Foundation). They are termed Biodiversity Exploratories, in contrast to mainly descriptive observatories. The exploratories sustain the scientific infrastructure to develop the intellectual framework needed to address critical questions about changes in biodiversity and to evaluate the impacts of those changes for ecosystem processes. Thus, in the exploratories biodiversity and ecosystem research will be merged at a large scale and with a long-term perspective. In the first phase 2006-09 the exploratories addressed the relationship between land-use intensity, biodiversity change, and ecosystem functioning for selected taxa. In 2008 the exploratories integrated further contributing projects proposed by the German research community. Thus, the biodiversity exploratories serve as a stimulating research platform for the whole German biodiversity research community. Comprehensive data are collected for about ten years: In the Hainich, in the Swabian Alb and in the Schorfheide scientist examining from all over Germany Biodiversity and analyze ecosystem processes. Computer scientists from the University of Jena now publish first data from the Biodiversity exploratories on internet, to make it so for further research available.
The Database explores the interactions of chemicals and proteins. It integrates information about interactions from metabolic pathways, crystal structures, binding experiments and drug-target relationships. Inferred information from phenotypic effects, text mining and chemical structure similarity is used to predict relations between chemicals. STITCH further allows exploring the network of chemical relations, also in the context of associated binding proteins.
The UCSD Signaling Gateway Molecule Pages provide essential information on over thousands of proteins involved in cellular signaling. Each Molecule Page contains regularly updated information derived from public data sources as well as sequence analysis, references and links to other databases.
The Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) provides DNA barcode data. BOLD's online workbench supports data validation, annotation, and publication for specimen, distributional, and molecular data. The platform consists of four main modules: a data portal, a database of barcode clusters, an educational portal, and a data collection workbench. BOLD is the go-to site for DNA-based identification. As the central informatics platform for DNA barcoding, BOLD plays a crucial role in assimilating and organizing data gathered by the international barcode research community. Two iBOL (International Barcode of Life) Working Groups are supporting the ongoing development of BOLD.
Country
CEEHRC represents a multi-stage funding commitment by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) and multiple Canadian and international partners. The overall aim is to position Canada at the forefront of international efforts to translate new discoveries in the field of epigenetics into improved human health. The two sites will focus on sequencing human reference epigenomes and developing new technologies and protocols; they will also serve as platforms for other CEEHRC funding initiatives, such as catalyst and team grants. The complementary reference epigenome mapping efforts of the two sites will focus on a range of common human diseases. The Vancouver group will focus on the role of epigenetics in the development of cancer, including lymphoma and cancers of the ovary, colon, breast, and thyroid. The Montreal team will focus on autoimmune / inflammatory, cardio-metabolic, and neuropsychiatric diseases, using studies of identical twins as well as animal models of human disease.
We are developing an open, online platform to provide a seamless access to cloud computing infrastructure and brain data and data derivatives. This platform is meant to reach out beyond neuroscience, allowing also computer scientists, statisticians and engineers interested in brain data to use the data to develop and publish their methods. Brain Life is a project under active development. We currently offer several cloud computing services – also called Brain Life Applications. Sixty-six collaborators from global scientific communities contribute to the project by providing data, applications, technology and products to advance understanding the human brain.
GenBank® is a comprehensive database that contains publicly available nucleotide sequences for almost 260 000 formally described species. These sequences are obtained primarily through submissions from individual laboratories and batch submissions from large-scale sequencing projects, including whole-genome shotgun (WGS) and environmental sampling projects. Most submissions are made using the web-based BankIt or standalone Sequin programs, and GenBank staff assigns accession numbers upon data receipt. Daily data exchange with the European Nucleotide Archive (ENA) and the DNA Data Bank of Japan (DDBJ) ensures worldwide coverage. GenBank is accessible through the NCBI Entrez retrieval system, which integrates data from the major DNA and protein sequence databases along with taxonomy, genome, mapping, protein structure and domain information, and the biomedical journal literature via PubMed. BLAST provides sequence similarity searches of GenBank and other sequence databases. Complete bimonthly releases and daily updates of the GenBank database are available by FTP.
Country
Stemformatics is a collaboration between the stem cell and bioinformatics community. We were motivated by the plethora of exciting cell models in the public and private domains, and the realisation that for many biologists these were mostly inaccessible. We wanted a fast way to find and visualise interesting genes in these exemplar stem cell datasets. We'd like you to explore. You'll find data from leading stem cell laboratories in a format that is easy to search, easy to visualise and easy to export.
Country
The Cognitive Interaction Toolkit provides a unified view on linked research artifacts of collaborating institutions in the Bielefeld University’s strategic research area Interactive Intelligent Systems. It binds together a framework for software integration, software and hardware components, system descriptions, experiments, data sets, and publications. The research artifacts are hosted at a distributed service infrastructure that includes project oriented collaboration platforms, opensource and opendata servers, continuous integration services, and publication data servers. These are accessible via this web catalog defining a central collaborative instance for integrated research efforts.
>>>!!!<<< caArray Retirement Announcement >>>!!!<<< The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology (CBIIT) instance of the caArray database was retired on March 31st, 2015. All publicly-accessible caArray data and annotations will be archived and will remain available via FTP download https://wiki.nci.nih.gov/x/UYHeDQ and is also available at GEO http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/ . >>>!!!<<< While NCI will not be able to provide technical support for the caArray software after the retirement, the source code is available on GitHub https://github.com/NCIP/caarray , and we encourage continued community development. Molecular Analysis of Brain Neoplasia (Rembrandt fine-00037) gene expression data has been loaded into ArrayExpress: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/arrayexpress/experiments/E-MTAB-3073 >>>!!!<<< caArray is an open-source, web and programmatically accessible microarray data management system that supports the annotation of microarray data using MAGE-TAB and web-based forms. Data and annotations may be kept private to the owner, shared with user-defined collaboration groups, or made public. The NCI instance of caArray hosts many cancer-related public datasets available for download.
SimTK is a free project-hosting platform for the biomedical computation community that enables researchers to easily share their software, data, and models and provides the infrastructure so they can support and grow a community around their projects. It has over 62,000 members, hosts more than 960 projects from researchers around the world, and has had more than 500,000 files downloaded from it. Individuals have created SimTK projects to meet publisher and funding agencies’ software and data sharing requirements, run scientific challenges, create a collection of their community’s resources, and much more.