Filter
Reset all

Subjects

Content Types

Countries

AID systems

API

Certificates

Data access

Data access restrictions

Database access

Database access restrictions

Database licenses

Data licenses

Data upload

Data upload restrictions

Enhanced publication

Institution responsibility type

Institution type

Keywords

Metadata standards

PID systems

Provider types

Quality management

Repository languages

Software

Syndications

Repository types

Versioning

  • * at the end of a keyword allows wildcard searches
  • " quotes can be used for searching phrases
  • + represents an AND search (default)
  • | represents an OR search
  • - represents a NOT operation
  • ( and ) implies priority
  • ~N after a word specifies the desired edit distance (fuzziness)
  • ~N after a phrase specifies the desired slop amount
Found 35 result(s)
The WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network (WWARN) is a collaborative platform generating innovative resources and reliable evidence to inform the malaria community on the factors affecting the efficacy of antimalarial medicines. Access to data is provided through diverse Tools and Resources: WWARN Explorer, Molecular Surveyor K13 Methodology, Molecular Surveyor pfmdr1 & pfcrt, Molecular Surveyor dhfr & dhps.
The European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) has a long-standing mission to collect, organise and make available databases for biomolecular science. It makes available a collection of databases along with tools to search, download and analyse their content. These databases include DNA and protein sequences and structures, genome annotation, gene expression information, molecular interactions and pathways. Connected to these are linking and descriptive data resources such as protein motifs, ontologies and many others. In many of these efforts, the EBI is a European node in global data-sharing agreements involving, for example, the USA and Japan.
Country
BRENDA is the main collection of enzyme functional data available to the scientific community worldwide. The enzymes are classified according to the Enzyme Commission list of enzymes. It is available free of charge for via the internet (http://www.brenda-enzymes.org/) and as an in-house database for commercial users (requests to our distributor Biobase). The enzymes are classified according to the Enzyme Commission list of enzymes. Some 5000 "different" enzymes are covered. Frequently enzymes with very different properties are included under the same EC number. BRENDA includes biochemical and molecular information on classification, nomenclature, reaction, specificity, functional parameters, occurrence, enzyme structure, application, engineering, stability, disease, isolation, and preparation. The database also provides additional information on ligands, which function as natural or in vitro substrates/products, inhibitors, activating compounds, cofactors, bound metals, and other attributes.
dictyBase is an integrated genetic and literature database that contains published Dictyostelium discoideum literature, genes, expressed sequence tags (ESTs), as well as the chromosomal and mitochondrial genome sequences. Direct access to the genome browser, a Blast search tool, the Dictyostelium Stock Center, research tools, colleague databases, and much much more are just a mouse click away. Dictybase is a genome portal for the Amoebozoa. dictyBase is funded by a grant from the National Institute for General Medical Sciences.
Human Proteinpedia is a community portal for sharing and integration of human protein data. This is a joint project between Pandey at Johns Hopkins University, and Institute of Bioinformatics, Bangalore. This portal allows research laboratories around the world to contribute and maintain protein annotations. Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD) integrates data, that is deposited in Human Proteinpedia along with the existing literature curated information in the context of an individual protein. All the public data contributed to Human Proteinpedia can be queried, viewed and downloaded. Data pertaining to post-translational modifications, protein interactions, tissue expression, expression in cell lines, subcellular localization and enzyme substrate relationships may be deposited.
GeneCards is a searchable, integrative database that provides comprehensive, user-friendly information on all annotated and predicted human genes. It automatically integrates gene-centric data from ~125 web sources, including genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, genetic, clinical and functional information.
The PRIDE PRoteomics IDEntifications database is a centralized, standards compliant, public data repository for proteomics data, including protein and peptide identifications, post-translational modifications and supporting spectral evidence. PRIDE encourages and welcomes direct user submissions of mass spectrometry data to be published in peer-reviewed publications.
Project Achilles is a systematic effort aimed at identifying and cataloging genetic vulnerabilities across hundreds of genomically characterized cancer cell lines. The project uses genome-wide genetic perturbation reagents (shRNAs or Cas9/sgRNAs) to silence or knock-out individual genes and identify those genes that affect cell survival. Large-scale functional screening of cancer cell lines provides a complementary approach to those studies that aim to characterize the molecular alterations (e.g. mutations, copy number alterations) of primary tumors, such as The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). The overall goal of the project is to identify cancer genetic dependencies and link them to molecular characteristics in order to prioritize targets for therapeutic development and identify the patient population that might benefit from such targets.
Xenbase's mission is to provide the international research community with a comprehensive, integrated and easy to use web based resource that gives access the diverse and rich genomic, expression and functional data available from Xenopus research. Xenbase also provides a critical data sharing infrastructure for many other NIH-funded projects, and is a focal point for the Xenopus community. In addition to our primary goal of supporting Xenopus researchers, Xenbase enhances the availability and visibility of Xenopus data to the broader biomedical research community.
Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD) has been established by a team of biologists, bioinformaticists and software engineers. This is a joint project between the PandeyLab at Johns Hopkins University, and Institute of Bioinformatics, Bangalore. HPRD is a definitive repository of human proteins. This database should serve as a ready reckoner for researchers in their quest for drug discovery, identification of disease markers and promote biomedical research in general. Human Proteinpedia (www.humanproteinpedia.org) is its associated data portal.
Country
This DOI repository provides permanent identifiers to data sets generated by Life Science researchers active in Sweden, and for which no other suitable public repository is available. BILS is a distributed national research infrastructure supported by the Swedish Research Council (Vetenskapsrådet) providing bioinformatics support to life science researchers in Sweden.
OpenWorm aims to build the first comprehensive computational model of the Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans), a microscopic roundworm. With only a thousand cells, it solves basic problems such as feeding, mate-finding and predator avoidance. Despite being extremely well studied in biology, this organism still eludes a deep, principled understanding of its biology. We are using a bottom-up approach, aimed at observing the worm behaviour emerge from a simulation of data derived from scientific experiments carried out over the past decade. To do so we are incorporating the data available in the scientific community into software models. We are engineering Geppetto and Sibernetic, open-source simulation platforms, to be able to run these different models in concert. We are also forging new collaborations with universities and research institutes to collect data that fill in the gaps All the code we produce in the OpenWorm project is Open Source and available on GitHub.
Country
In the framework of an initiative to advance biodiversity research in Germany, we established three exemplary large-scale and long-term research sites (funded by the German Research Foundation). They are termed Biodiversity Exploratories, in contrast to mainly descriptive observatories. The exploratories sustain the scientific infrastructure to develop the intellectual framework needed to address critical questions about changes in biodiversity and to evaluate the impacts of those changes for ecosystem processes. Thus, in the exploratories biodiversity and ecosystem research will be merged at a large scale and with a long-term perspective. In the first phase 2006-09 the exploratories addressed the relationship between land-use intensity, biodiversity change, and ecosystem functioning for selected taxa. In 2008 the exploratories integrated further contributing projects proposed by the German research community. Thus, the biodiversity exploratories serve as a stimulating research platform for the whole German biodiversity research community. Comprehensive data are collected for about ten years: In the Hainich, in the Swabian Alb and in the Schorfheide scientist examining from all over Germany Biodiversity and analyze ecosystem processes. Computer scientists from the University of Jena now publish first data from the Biodiversity exploratories on internet, to make it so for further research available.
The Database explores the interactions of chemicals and proteins. It integrates information about interactions from metabolic pathways, crystal structures, binding experiments and drug-target relationships. Inferred information from phenotypic effects, text mining and chemical structure similarity is used to predict relations between chemicals. STITCH further allows exploring the network of chemical relations, also in the context of associated binding proteins.
The UCSD Signaling Gateway Molecule Pages provide essential information on over thousands of proteins involved in cellular signaling. Each Molecule Page contains regularly updated information derived from public data sources as well as sequence analysis, references and links to other databases.
Code Ocean is a cloud-based computational reproducibility platform that provides researchers and developers an easy way to share, discover and run code published in academic journals and conferences.
The EZRC at KIT houses the largest experimental fish facility in Europe with a capacity of more than 300,000 fish. Zebrafish stocks are maintained mostly as frozen sperm. Frequently requested lines are also kept alive as well as a selection of wildtype strains. Several thousand mutations in protein coding genes generated by TILLING in the Stemple lab of the Sanger Centre, Hinxton, UK and lines generated by ENU mutagenesis by the Nüsslein-Volhard lab in addition to transgenic lines and mutants generated by KIT groups or brought in through collaborations. We also accept submissions on an individual basis and ship fish upon request to PIs in Europe and elsewhere. EZRC also provides screening services and technologies such as imaging and high-throughput sequencing. Key areas include automation of embryo handling and automated image acquisition and processing. Our platform also involves the development of novel microscopy techniques (e.g. SPIM, DSLM, robotic macroscope) to permit high-resolution, real-time imaging in 4D. By association with the ComPlat platform, we can support also chemical screens and offer libraries with up to 20,000 compounds in total for external users. As another service to the community the EZRC provides plasmids (cDNAs, transgenes, Talen, Crispr/cas9) maintained by the Helmholtz repository of Bioparts (HERBI) to the scientific community. In addition the fish facility keeps a range of medaka stocks, maintained by the Loosli group.
The Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) provides DNA barcode data. BOLD's online workbench supports data validation, annotation, and publication for specimen, distributional, and molecular data. The platform consists of four main modules: a data portal, a database of barcode clusters, an educational portal, and a data collection workbench. BOLD is the go-to site for DNA-based identification. As the central informatics platform for DNA barcoding, BOLD plays a crucial role in assimilating and organizing data gathered by the international barcode research community. Two iBOL (International Barcode of Life) Working Groups are supporting the ongoing development of BOLD.
Country
CEEHRC represents a multi-stage funding commitment by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) and multiple Canadian and international partners. The overall aim is to position Canada at the forefront of international efforts to translate new discoveries in the field of epigenetics into improved human health. The two sites will focus on sequencing human reference epigenomes and developing new technologies and protocols; they will also serve as platforms for other CEEHRC funding initiatives, such as catalyst and team grants. The complementary reference epigenome mapping efforts of the two sites will focus on a range of common human diseases. The Vancouver group will focus on the role of epigenetics in the development of cancer, including lymphoma and cancers of the ovary, colon, breast, and thyroid. The Montreal team will focus on autoimmune / inflammatory, cardio-metabolic, and neuropsychiatric diseases, using studies of identical twins as well as animal models of human disease.
We are developing an open, online platform to provide a seamless access to cloud computing infrastructure and brain data and data derivatives. This platform is meant to reach out beyond neuroscience, allowing also computer scientists, statisticians and engineers interested in brain data to use the data to develop and publish their methods. Brain Life is a project under active development. We currently offer several cloud computing services – also called Brain Life Applications. Sixty-six collaborators from global scientific communities contribute to the project by providing data, applications, technology and products to advance understanding the human brain.
GenBank® is a comprehensive database that contains publicly available nucleotide sequences for almost 260 000 formally described species. These sequences are obtained primarily through submissions from individual laboratories and batch submissions from large-scale sequencing projects, including whole-genome shotgun (WGS) and environmental sampling projects. Most submissions are made using the web-based BankIt or standalone Sequin programs, and GenBank staff assigns accession numbers upon data receipt. Daily data exchange with the European Nucleotide Archive (ENA) and the DNA Data Bank of Japan (DDBJ) ensures worldwide coverage. GenBank is accessible through the NCBI Entrez retrieval system, which integrates data from the major DNA and protein sequence databases along with taxonomy, genome, mapping, protein structure and domain information, and the biomedical journal literature via PubMed. BLAST provides sequence similarity searches of GenBank and other sequence databases. Complete bimonthly releases and daily updates of the GenBank database are available by FTP.