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The IMPC is a confederation of international mouse phenotyping projects working towards the agreed goals of the consortium: To undertake the phenotyping of 20,000 mouse mutants over a ten year period, providing the first functional annotation of a mammalian genome. Maintain and expand a world-wide consortium of institutions with capacity and expertise to produce germ line transmission of targeted knockout mutations in embryonic stem cells for 20,000 known and predicted mouse genes. Test each mutant mouse line through a broad based primary phenotyping pipeline in all the major adult organ systems and most areas of major human disease. Through this activity and employing data annotation tools, systematically aim to discover and ascribe biological function to each gene, driving new ideas and underpinning future research into biological systems; Maintain and expand collaborative “networks” with specialist phenotyping consortia or laboratories, providing standardized secondary level phenotyping that enriches the primary dataset, and end-user, project specific tertiary level phenotyping that adds value to the mammalian gene functional annotation and fosters hypothesis driven research; and Provide a centralized data centre and portal for free, unrestricted access to primary and secondary data by the scientific community, promoting sharing of data, genotype-phenotype annotation, standard operating protocols, and the development of open source data analysis tools. Members of the IMPC may include research centers, funding organizations and corporations.
The Drosophila Synthetic Population Resource (DSPR) consists of a new panel of over 1700 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) of Drosophila melanogaster, derived from two highly recombined synthetic populations, each created by intercrossing a different set of 8 inbred founder lines (with one founder line common to both populations). Complete genome sequence data for the founder lines are available, and in addition, there is a high resolution genetic map for each RIL. The DSPR has been developed as a community resource for high-resolution QTL mapping and is intended to be used widely by the Drosophila community.
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The Cystic Fibrosis Mutation Database (CFTR1) was initiated by the Cystic Fibrosis Genetic Analysis Consortium in 1989 to increase and facilitate communications among CF researchers, and is maintained by the Cystic Fibrosis Centre at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto. The specific aim of the database is to provide up to date information about individual mutations in the CFTR gene. In a major upgrade in 2010, all known CFTR mutations and sequence variants have been converted to the standard nomenclature recommended by the Human Genome Variation Society.
The Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC) is a coalition of investigators seeking to aggregate and harmonize exome sequencing data from a wide variety of large-scale sequencing projects, and to make summary data available for the wider scientific community. The data set provided on this website spans 60,706 unrelated individuals sequenced as part of various disease-specific and population genetic studies.
The NCBI Short Genetic Variations database, commonly known as dbSNP, catalogs short variations in nucleotide sequences from a wide range of organisms. These variations include single nucleotide variations, short nucleotide insertions and deletions, short tandem repeats and microsatellites. Short Genetic Variations may be common, thus representing true polymorphisms, or they may be rare. Some rare human entries have additional information associated withthem, including disease associations, genotype information and allele origin, as some variations are somatic rather than germline events. ***NCBI will phase out support for non-human organism data in dbSNP and dbVar beginning on September 1, 2017***
As with most biomedical databases, the first step is to identify relevant data from the research community. The Monarch Initiative is focused primarily on phenotype-related resources. We bring in data associated with those phenotypes so that our users can begin to make connections among other biological entities of interest. We import data from a variety of data sources. With many resources integrated into a single database, we can join across the various data sources to produce integrated views. We have started with the big players including ClinVar and OMIM, but are equally interested in boutique databases. You can learn more about the sources of data that populate our system from our data sources page https://monarchinitiative.org/about/sources.
The Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP) is a population consisting of more than 200 inbred lines derived from the Raleigh, USA population. The DGRP is a living library of common polymorphisms affecting complex traits, and a community resource for whole genome association mapping of quantitative trait loci.