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Found 13 result(s)
The Structure database provides three-dimensional structures of macromolecules for a variety of research purposes and allows the user to retrieve structures for specific molecule types as well as structures for genes and proteins of interest. Three main databases comprise Structure-The Molecular Modeling Database; Conserved Domains and Protein Classification; and the BioSystems Database. Structure also links to the PubChem databases to connect biological activity data to the macromolecular structures. Users can locate structural templates for proteins and interactively view structures and sequence data to closely examine sequence-structure relationships.
The ISSAID website gathers resources related to the systemic autoinflammatory diseases in order to facilitate contacts between interested physicians and researchers. The website provides support to share and rapidly disseminate information, thoughts, feelings and experiences to improve the quality of life of patients and families affected by systemic autoinflammatory diseases, and promote advances in the search for causes and cures.
OMIM is a comprehensive, authoritative compendium of human genes and genetic phenotypes that is freely available and updated daily. OMIM is authored and edited at the McKusick-Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, under the direction of Dr. Ada Hamosh. Its official home is omim.org.
The MG-RAST server is an open source system for annotation and comparative analysis of metagenomes. Users can upload raw sequence data in fasta format; the sequences will be normalized and processed and summaries automatically generated. The server provides several methods to access the different data types, including phylogenetic and metabolic reconstructions, and the ability to compare the metabolism and annotations of one or more metagenomes and genomes. In addition, the server offers a comprehensive search capability. Access to the data is password protected, and all data generated by the automated pipeline is available for download in a variety of common formats. MG-RAST has become an unofficial repository for metagenomic data, providing a means to make your data public so that it is available for download and viewing of the analysis without registration, as well as a static link that you can use in publications. It also requires that you include experimental metadata about your sample when it is made public to increase the usefulness to the community.
GOLD is currently the largest repository for genome project information world-wide. The accurate and efficient genome project tracking is a vital criterion for launching new genome sequencing projects, and for avoiding significant overlap between various sequencing efforts and centers.
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CORUM is a manually curated dataset of mammalian protein complexes. Annotation of protein complexes includes protein complex composition and other valuable information such as method of purification, cellular function of complexes or involvement in diseases.
The Sequence Read Archive stores the raw sequencing data from such sequencing platforms as the Roche 454 GS System, the Illumina Genome Analyzer, the Applied Biosystems SOLiD System, the Helicos Heliscope, and the Complete Genomics. It archives the sequencing data associated with RNA-Seq, ChIP-Seq, Genomic and Transcriptomic assemblies, and 16S ribosomal RNA data.
The Protein database is a collection of sequences from several sources, including translations from annotated coding regions in GenBank, RefSeq and TPA, as well as records from SwissProt, PIR, PRF, and PDB. Protein sequences are the fundamental determinants of biological structure and function.
The NCBI Nucleotide database collects sequences from such sources as GenBank, RefSeq, TPA, and PDB. Sequences collected relate to genome, gene, and transcript sequence data, and provide a foundation for research related to the biomedical field.