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Found 14 result(s)
EMBL-EBI provides freely available data from life science experiments covering the full spectrum of molecular biology.The EBI Metagenomics service is an automated pipeline for the analysis and archiving of metagenomic data that aims to provide insights into the phylogenetic diversity as well as the functional and metabolic potential of a sample.
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The Autism Chromosome Rearrangement Database is a collection of hand curated breakpoints and other genomic features, related to autism, taken from publicly available literature: databases and unpublished data. The database is continuously updated with information from in-house experimental data as well as data from published research studies.
The aim of FlyReactome, based in the Department of Genetics, University of Cambridge, is to develop a curated repository for Drosophila melanogaster pathways and reactions. The information in this database is authored by biological researchers with expertise in their fields, maintained by the FlyReactome staff.
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NONCODE is an integrated knowledge database dedicated to non-coding RNAs (excluding tRNAs and rRNAs). Now, there are 16 species in NONCODE(human, mouse, cow, rat, chicken, fruitfly, zebrafish, celegans, yeast, Arabidopsis, chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, rhesus macaque, opossum and platypus).The source of NONCODE includes literature and other public databases. We searched PubMed using key words ‘ncrna’, ‘noncoding’, ‘non-coding’,‘no code’, ‘non-code’, ‘lncrna’ or ‘lincrna. We retrieved the new identified lncRNAs and their annotation from the Supplementary Material or web site of these articles. Together with the newest data from Ensembl , RefSeq, lncRNAdb and GENCODE were processed through a standard pipeline for each species.
The Expression Atlas provides information on gene expression patterns under different biological conditions such as a gene knock out, a plant treated with a compound, or in a particular organism part or cell. It includes both microarray and RNA-seq data. The data is re-analysed in-house to detect interesting expression patterns under the conditions of the original experiment. There are two components to the Expression Atlas, the Baseline Atlas and the Differential Atlas. The Baseline Atlas displays information about which gene products are present (and at what abundance) in "normal" conditions (e.g. tissue, cell type). It aims to answer questions such as "which genes are specifically expressed in human kidney?". This component of the Expression Atlas consists of highly-curated and quality-checked RNA-seq experiments from ArrayExpress. It has data for many different animal and plant species. New experiments are added as they become available. The Differential Atlas allows users to identify genes that are up- or down-regulated in a wide variety of different experimental conditions such as yeast mutants, cadmium treated plants, cystic fibrosis or the effect on gene expression of mind-body practice. Both microarray and RNA-seq experiments are included in the Differential Atlas. Experiments are selected from ArrayExpress and groups of samples are manually identified for comparison e.g. those with wild type genotype compared to those with a gene knock out. Each experiment is processed through our in-house differential expression statistical analysis pipeline to identify genes with a high probability of differential expression.
RDP provides quality-controlled, aligned and annotated Bacterial and Archaeal 16S rRNA sequences, and Fungal 28S rRNA sequences, and a suite of analysis tools to the scientific community.
The DIP database catalogs experimentally determined interactions between proteins. It combines information from a variety of sources to create a single, consistent set of protein-protein interactions. The data stored within the DIP database were curated, both, manually by expert curators and also automatically using computational approaches that utilize the the knowledge about the protein-protein interaction networks extracted from the most reliable, core subset of the DIP data. Please, check the reference page to find articles describing the DIP database in greater detail. The Database of Ligand-Receptor Partners (DLRP) is a subset of DIP (Database of Interacting Proteins). The DLRP is a database of protein ligand and protein receptor pairs that are known to interact with each other. By interact we mean that the ligand and receptor are members of a ligand-receptor complex and, unless otherwise noted, transduce a signal. In some instances the ligand and/or receptor may form a heterocomplex with other ligands/receptors in order to be functional. We have entered the majority of interactions in DLRP as full DIP entries, with links to references and additional information
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The Open REGulatory ANNOtation database (ORegAnno) is an open database for the curation of known regulatory elements from scientific literature. Annotation is collected from users worldwide for various biological assays and is automatically cross-referenced against PubMED, Entrez Gene, EnsEMBL, dbSNP, the eVOC: Cell type ontology, and the Taxonomy database, where appropriate, with information regarding the original experimentation performed (evidence). ORegAnno further provides an open validation process for all regulatory annotation in the public domain. Assigned validators receive notification of new records in the database and are able to cross-reference the citation to ensure record integrity. Validators have the ability to modify any record (deprecating the old record and creating a new one) if an error is found. Further, any contributor to the database can comment on any annotation by marking errors, or adding special reports into function as they see fit. These features of ORegAnno ensure that the collection is of the highest quality and uniquely provides a dynamic view of our changing understanding of gene regulation in the various genomes.
BioModels Database is a repository of peer-reviewed, published, computational models that allows biologists to store, search and retrieve published mathematical models from the field of systems biology, but also more generally those of biological interest. Models in the database can be used to generate sub-models, can be simulated online, and can be converted between different representational formats.
The GeneDB project is a core part of the Sanger Institute's Pathogen Genomics activities. Its primary goals are: to provide reliable access to the latest sequence data and annotation/curation for the whole range of organisms sequenced by the Pathogen group. to develop the website and other tools to aid the community in accessing and obtaining the maximum value from these data.
InnateDB is a publicly available database of the genes, proteins, experimentally-verified interactions and signaling pathways involved in the innate immune response of humans, mice and bovines to microbial infection. The database captures an improved coverage of the innate immunity interactome by integrating known interactions and pathways from major public databases together with manually-curated data into a centralised resource. The database can be mined as a knowledgebase or used with our integrated bioinformatics and visualization tools for the systems level analysis of the innate immune response.
The GSS database collects unannotated, short, single-read, primary genomic sequences from GenBank and contains nucleic acid sequences. These sequences include random survey sequences, clone-end sequences, and exon-trapped sequences.
InterPro collects information about protein sequence analysis and classification, providing access to a database of predictive protein signatures used for the classification and automatic annotation of proteins and genomes. Sequences in InterPro are classified at superfamily, family, and subfamily. InterPro predicts the occurrence of functional domains, repeats, and important sites, and adds in-depth annotation such as GO terms to the protein signatures.