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Found 20 result(s)
RDP provides quality-controlled, aligned and annotated Bacterial and Archaeal 16S rRNA sequences, and Fungal 28S rRNA sequences, and a suite of analysis tools to the scientific community.
The IMEx consortium is an international collaboration between a group of major public interaction data providers who have agreed to share curation effort and develop and work to a single set of curation rules when capturing data from both directly deposited interaction data or from publications in peer-reviewed journals, capture full details of an interaction in a “deep” curation model, perform a complete curation of all protein-protein interactions experimentally demonstrated within a publication, make these interaction available in a single search interface on a common website, provide the data in standards compliant download formats, make all IMEx records freely accessible under the Creative Commons Attribution License
STRING is a database of known and predicted protein interactions. The interactions include direct (physical) and indirect (functional) associations; they are derived from four sources: - Genomic Context - High-throughput Experiments - (Conserved) Coexpression - Previous Knowledge STRING quantitatively integrates interaction data from these sources for a large number of organisms, and transfers information between these organisms where applicable.
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The JCB DataViewer is an image hosting and presentation platform for original image datasets associated with articles published in The Journal of Cell Biology, a peer-reviewed journal from the Rockefeller University Press.
Morph·D·Base has been developed to serve scientific research and education. It provides a platform for storing the detailed documentation of all material, methods, procedures, and concepts applied, together with the specific parameters, values, techniques, and instruments used during morphological data production. In other words, it's purpose is to provide a publicly available resource for recording and documenting morphological metadata. Moreover, it is also a repository for different types of media files that can be uploaded in order to serve as support and empirical substantiation of the results of morphological investigations. Our long-term perspective with Morph·D·Base is to provide an instrument that will enable a highly formalized and standardized way of generating morphological descriptions using a morphological ontology that will be based on the web ontology language (OWL - This, however, represents a project that is still in development.
This library is a public and easily accessible resource database of images, videos, and animations of cells, capturing a wide diversity of organisms, cell types, and cellular processes. The purpose of this database is to advance research on cellular activity, with the ultimate goal of improving human health.
We developed a method, ChIP-sequencing (ChIP-seq), combining chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and massively parallel sequencing to identify mammalian DNA sequences bound by transcription factors in vivo. We used ChIP-seq to map STAT1 targets in interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma)-stimulated and unstimulated human HeLa S3 cells, and compared the method's performance to ChIP-PCR and to ChIP-chip for four chromosomes.For both Chromatin- immunoprecipation Transcription Factors and Histone modifications. Sequence files and the associated probability files are also provided.
Content type(s)
The IDR makes datasets that have never previously been accessible publicly available, allowing the community to search, view, mine and even process and analyze large, complex, multidimensional life sciences image data. Sharing data promotes the validation of experimental methods and scientific conclusions, the comparison with new data obtained by the global scientific community, and enables data reuse by developers of new analysis and processing tools.
Database of mass spectra of known, unknown and provisionally identified substances. MassBank is the first public repository of mass spectral data for sharing them among scientific research community. MassBank data are useful for the chemical identification and structure elucidation of chemical compounds detected by mass spectrometry.
This site offers an enormous collection of photographs of wild species and natural history objects. It covers most groups of organisms with the exception of birds and other vertebrates. The photographs are presented to illustrate biodiversity and as an aid to identification. The criterion for inclusion of a species is that it must have been, or might be expected to be, found in Britain or Ireland. BioImages follows the biological classification. Biota is a hierarchical system with species grouped in genera, genera in families, families in orders and so on up to kingdoms and superkingdoms. The datasets are linked to bioinfo: food webs and species interactions in the Biodiversity of UK and Ireland.
The Swedish Human Protein Atlas project has been set up to allow for a systematic exploration of the human proteome using Antibody-Based Proteomics. This is accomplished by combining high-throughput generation of affinity-purified antibodies with protein profiling in a multitude of tissues and cells assembled in tissue microarrays. Confocal microscopy analysis using human cell lines is performed for more detailed protein localization. The program hosts the Human Protein Atlas portal with expression profiles of human proteins in tissues and cells. The main objective of the resource centre is to produce specific antibodies to human target proteins using a high-throughput production method involving the cloning and protein expression of Protein Epitope Signature Tags (PrESTs). After purification, the antibodies are used to study expression profiles in cells and tissues and for functional analysis of the corresponding proteins in a wide range of platforms.
PDBj (Protein Data Bank Japan) provides a centralized PDB archive of macromolecular structures, integrated tools for data retrieval, visualization, and functional characterization. PDBj is supported by JST-NBDC and Osaka University.
The Database explores the interactions of chemicals and proteins. It integrates information about interactions from metabolic pathways, crystal structures, binding experiments and drug-target relationships. Inferred information from phenotypic effects, text mining and chemical structure similarity is used to predict relations between chemicals. STITCH further allows exploring the network of chemical relations, also in the context of associated binding proteins.
!!! Starting September 2013, MINT uses the IntAct database infrastructure to limit the duplication of efforts and to optimise future software development. Data manually curated by the MINT curators can now be accessed from the IntAct homepage at the EBI. Data maintenance and release, MINT PSICQUIC and IMEx services are under the responsibility of the IntAct team, while curation effort will be carried by both groups. The MINT development team now focuses on two new developments: mentha that integrates protein interaction information curated by IMEx databases and SIGNOR a database of logic relationships between human proteins. !!! MINT is a public repository for molecular interactions reported in peer-reviewed journals.IT is a collection of molecular interaction databases that can be used to search for, analyze and graphically display molecular interaction networks and pathways from a wide variety of species. MINT is comprised of separate database components. HomoMINT, is an inferred human protein interatction database. Domino, is database of domain peptide interactions. A new component has been added called VirusMINT that explores the interactions of viral proteins with human proteins.
This database will provide a central location for scientists to browse uniquely observed proteoforms and to contribute their own datasets. Top-down proteomics is a method of protein identification that uses an ion trapping mass spectrometer to store an isolated protein ion for mass measurement and tandem mass spectrometry analysis.
APID Interactomes is a database that provides a comprehensive collection of protein interactomes for more than 400 organisms based in the integration of known experimentally validated protein-protein physical interactions (PPIs). Construction of the interactomes is done with a methodological approach to report quality levels and coverage over the proteomes for each organism included. In this way, APID provides interactomes from specific organisms that in 25 cases have more than 500 proteins. As a whole APID includes a comprehensive compendium of 90,379 distinct proteins and 678,441 singular interactions. The analytical and integrative effort done in APID unifies PPIs from primary databases of molecular interactions (BIND, BioGRID, DIP, HPRD, IntAct, MINT) and also from experimentally resolved 3D structures (PDB) where more than two distinct proteins have been identified. In this way, 8,388 structures have been analyzed to find specific protein-protein interactions reported with details of their molecular interfaces. APID also includes a new data visualization web-tool that allows the construction of sub-interactomes using query lists of proteins of interest and the visual exploration of the corresponding networks, including an interactive selection of the properties of the interactions (i.e. the reliability of the "edges" in the network) and an interactive mapping of the functional environment of the proteins (i.e. the functional annotations of the "nodes" in the network).
The goal of the Autophagy Database is to provide up-to-date relevant information including protein structure data to researchers of autophagy, and to disseminate important findings to a wider audience so that their ramifications can be appreciated. For this purpose, we strive to make the database to contain as much pertinent information as possible and to make the contents freely available in a user-friendly format.
SwissLipids is an expert curated resource that provides a framework for the integration of lipid and lipidomic data with biological knowledge and models.