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Found 187 result(s)
The Structure database provides three-dimensional structures of macromolecules for a variety of research purposes and allows the user to retrieve structures for specific molecule types as well as structures for genes and proteins of interest. Three main databases comprise Structure-The Molecular Modeling Database; Conserved Domains and Protein Classification; and the BioSystems Database. Structure also links to the PubChem databases to connect biological activity data to the macromolecular structures. Users can locate structural templates for proteins and interactively view structures and sequence data to closely examine sequence-structure relationships.
Intrepid Bioinformatics serves as a community for genetic researchers and scientific programmers who need to achieve meaningful use of their genetic research data – but can’t spend tremendous amounts of time or money in the process. The Intrepid Bioinformatics system automates time consuming manual processes, shortens workflow, and eliminates the threat of lost data in a faster, cheaper, and better environment than existing solutions. The system also provides the functionality and community features needed to analyze the large volumes of Next Generation Sequencing and Single Nucleotide Polymorphism data, which is generated for a wide range of purposes from disease tracking and animal breeding to medical diagnosis and treatment.
The taxonomically broad EST database TBestDB serves as a repository for EST data from a wide range of eukaryotes, many of which have previously not been thoroughly investigated. Most of the data contained in TBestDB has been generated by the labs of the Protist EST Program located in six universities across Canada. PEP is a large interdisciplinaryresearch project, involving six Canadian universities. PEP aims at the exploration of the diversity of eukaryotic genomes in a systematic, comprehensive and integrated way. The focus is on unicellular microbial eukaryotes, known as protists. Protistan eukaryotes comprise more than a dozen major lineages that, together, encompass more evolutionary, ecological and probably biochemical diversity than the multicellular kingdoms of animals, plants and fungi combined. PEP is a unique endeavor in that it is the first phylogenetically-broad genomic investigation of protists.
The JenAge Ageing Factor Database AgeFactDB is aimed at the collection and integration of ageing phenotype and lifespan data. Ageing factors are genes, chemical compounds or other factors such as dietary restriction, for example. In a first step ageing-related data are primarily taken from existing databases. In addition, new ageing-related information is included both by manual and automatic information extraction from the scientific literature. Based on a homology analysis, AgeFactDB also includes genes that are homologous to known ageing-related genes. These homologs are considered as candidate or putative ageing-related genes.
Silkworm Pathogen Database (SilkPathDB) is a comprehensive resource for studying on pathogens of silkworm, including microsporidia, fungi, bacteria and virus. SilkPathDB provides access to not only genomic data including functional annotation of genes and gene products, but also extensive biological information for gene expression data and corresponding researches. SilkPathDB will be help with researches on pathogens of silkworm as well as other Lepidoptera insects.
The RAMEDIS system is a platform independent, web-based information system for rare metabolic diseases based on filed case reports. It was developed in close cooperation with clinical partners to allow them to collect information on rare metabolic diseases with extensive details, e.g. about occurring symptoms, laboratory findings, therapy and molecular data.
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This database host for fungi data related to new classification with morphology, molecular and other important data. This fungal database allows deposition of taxonomic data, phenotypic details and other useful data, which will enhance our current taxonomic understanding and ultimately enable mycologists to gain better and updated insights into the current fungal classification system. In addition, the database will also allow access to comprehensive metadata including descriptions of voucher and type specimens.
eCrystals - Southampton is the archive for Crystal Structures generated by the Southampton Chemical Crystallography Group and the EPSRC UK National Crystallography Service.
The Universitat de Barcelona Digital Repository is an institutional resource containing open-access digital versions of publications related to the teaching, research and institutional activities of the UB's teaching staff and other members of the university community, including research data.
METLIN represents the largest MS/MS collection of data with the database generated at multiple collision energies and in positive and negative ionization modes. The data is generated on multiple instrument types including SCIEX, Agilent, Bruker and Waters QTOF mass spectrometers.
We are a leading international centre for genomics and bioinformatics research. Our mandate is to advance knowledge about cancer and other diseases, to improve human health through disease prevention, diagnosis and therapeutic approaches, and to realize the social and economic benefits of genomics research.
The Expression Atlas provides information on gene expression patterns under different biological conditions such as a gene knock out, a plant treated with a compound, or in a particular organism part or cell. It includes both microarray and RNA-seq data. The data is re-analysed in-house to detect interesting expression patterns under the conditions of the original experiment. There are two components to the Expression Atlas, the Baseline Atlas and the Differential Atlas. The Baseline Atlas displays information about which gene products are present (and at what abundance) in "normal" conditions (e.g. tissue, cell type). It aims to answer questions such as "which genes are specifically expressed in human kidney?". This component of the Expression Atlas consists of highly-curated and quality-checked RNA-seq experiments from ArrayExpress. It has data for many different animal and plant species. New experiments are added as they become available. The Differential Atlas allows users to identify genes that are up- or down-regulated in a wide variety of different experimental conditions such as yeast mutants, cadmium treated plants, cystic fibrosis or the effect on gene expression of mind-body practice. Both microarray and RNA-seq experiments are included in the Differential Atlas. Experiments are selected from ArrayExpress and groups of samples are manually identified for comparison e.g. those with wild type genotype compared to those with a gene knock out. Each experiment is processed through our in-house differential expression statistical analysis pipeline to identify genes with a high probability of differential expression.
=== Due to changes in technology and funding, the RAD website is no longer available === (a historical description is provided below). RAD as a schema is still very much active and incorporated in the GUS (Genomics Unified Schema) database system used by CBIL (EuPathDB, Beta Cell Genomics) and others. The schema for RAD can be viewed along with the other GUS namespaces through our Schema Browser. RAD is a resource for gene expression studies, which stores highly curated MIAME-compliant studies (i.e. experiments) employing a variety of technologies such as filter arrays, 2-channel microarrays, Affymetrix chips, SAGE, MPSS and RT-PCR. Data are available for querying and downloading based on the MGED ontology, publications or genes. Both public and private studies (the latter viewable only by users having appropriate logins and permissions) are available from this website
OMIM is a comprehensive, authoritative compendium of human genes and genetic phenotypes that is freely available and updated daily. OMIM is authored and edited at the McKusick-Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, under the direction of Dr. Ada Hamosh. Its official home is
The Organelle Genome Megasequencing Program (OGMP) provides mitochondrial, chloroplast, and mitochondrial plasmid genome data. OGMP tools allow direct comparison of OGMP and NCBI validated records. Includes GOBASE, a taxonomically broad organelle genome database that organizes and integrates diverse data related to mitochondria and chloroplasts.
RDP provides quality-controlled, aligned and annotated Bacterial and Archaeal 16S rRNA sequences, and Fungal 28S rRNA sequences, and a suite of analysis tools to the scientific community.
>>>!!!<<< SMD has been retired. After approximately fifteen years of microarray-centric research service, the Stanford Microarray Database has been retired. We apologize for any inconvenience; please read below for possible resolutions to your queries. If you are looking for any raw data that was directly linked to SMD from a manuscript, please search one of the public repositories. NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus EBI ArrayExpress All published data were previously communicated to one (or both) of the public repositories. Alternatively, data for publications between 1997 and 2004 were likely migrated to the Princeton University MicroArray Database, and are accessible there. If you are looking for a manuscript supplement (i.e. from a domain other than, perhaps try searching the Internet Archive: Wayback Machine . >>>!!!<<< The Stanford Microarray Database (SMD) is a DNA microarray research database that provides a large amount of data for public use.
The IMEx consortium is an international collaboration between a group of major public interaction data providers who have agreed to share curation effort and develop and work to a single set of curation rules when capturing data from both directly deposited interaction data or from publications in peer-reviewed journals, capture full details of an interaction in a “deep” curation model, perform a complete curation of all protein-protein interactions experimentally demonstrated within a publication, make these interaction available in a single search interface on a common website, provide the data in standards compliant download formats, make all IMEx records freely accessible under the Creative Commons Attribution License
IntAct provides a freely available, open source database system and analysis tools for molecular interaction data. All interactions are derived from literature curation or direct user submissions and are freely available.
STRING is a database of known and predicted protein interactions. The interactions include direct (physical) and indirect (functional) associations; they are derived from four sources: - Genomic Context - High-throughput Experiments - (Conserved) Coexpression - Previous Knowledge STRING quantitatively integrates interaction data from these sources for a large number of organisms, and transfers information between these organisms where applicable.
CBS offers Comprehensive public databases of DNA- and protein sequences, macromolecular structure, g ene and protein expression levels, pathway organization and cell signalling, have been established to optimise scientific exploitation of the explosion of data within biology. Unlike many other groups in the field of biomolecular informatics, Center for Biological Sequence Analysis directs its research primarily towards topics related to the elucidation of the functional aspects of complex biological mechanisms. Among contemporary bioinformatics concerns are reliable computational interpretation of a wide range of experimental data, and the detailed understanding of the molecular apparatus behind cellular mechanisms of sequence information. By exploiting available experimental data and evidence in the design of algorithms, sequence correlations and other features of biological significance can be inferred. In addition to the computational research the center also has experimental efforts in gene expression analysis using DNA chips and data generation in relation to the physical and structural properties of DNA. In the last decade, the Center for Biological Sequence Analysis has produced a large number of computational methods, which are offered to others via WWW servers.
The Human Genetic Variation Database (HGVD) aims to provide a central resource to archive and display Japanese genetic variation and association between the variation and transcription level of genes. The database currently contains genetic variations determined by exome sequencing of 1,208 individuals and genotyping data of common variations obtained from a cohort of 3,248 individuals.
The DOE Data Explorer (DDE) is an information tool to help you locate DOE's collections of data and non-text information and, at the same time, retrieve individual datasets within some of those collections. It includes collection citations prepared by the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, as well as citations for individual datasets submitted from DOE Data Centers and other organizations.
CPLM (Compendium of Protein Lysine Modifications) is an online data resource specifically designed for protein lysine modifications (PLMs). The CPLM database was extended and adapted from our CPLA 1.0 (Compendium of Protein Lysine Acetylation) database and the 2.0 release contains 203,972 modification events on 189,919 modified lysines in 45,748 proteins for 12 types of PLMs, including Nε-lysine acetylation, ubiquitination, methylation, sumoylation, glycation, butyrylation, crotonylation, malonylation, propionylation, succinylation, phosphoglycerylation and prokaryotic Pupylation.