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Found 12 result(s)
eCrystals - Southampton is the archive for Crystal Structures generated by the Southampton Chemical Crystallography Group and the EPSRC UK National Crystallography Service.
Edinburgh DataShare is an online digital repository of multi-disciplinary research datasets produced at the University of Edinburgh, hosted by the Data Library in Information Services. Edinburgh University researchers who have produced research data associated with an existing or forthcoming publication, or which has potential use for other researchers, are invited to upload their dataset for sharing and safekeeping. A persistent identifier and suggested citation will be provided.
dbEST is a division of GenBank that contains sequence data and other information on "single-pass" cDNA sequences, or "Expressed Sequence Tags", from a number of organisms. Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) are short (usually about 300-500 bp), single-pass sequence reads from mRNA (cDNA). Typically they are produced in large batches. They represent a snapshot of genes expressed in a given tissue and/or at a given developmental stage. They are tags (some coding, others not) of expression for a given cDNA library. Most EST projects develop large numbers of sequences. These are commonly submitted to GenBank and dbEST as batches of dozens to thousands of entries, with a great deal of redundancy in the citation, submitter and library information. To improve the efficiency of the submission process for this type of data, we have designed a special streamlined submission process and data format. dbEST also includes sequences that are longer than the traditional ESTs, or are produced as single sequences or in small batches. Among these sequences are products of differential display experiments and RACE experiments. The thing that these sequences have in common with traditional ESTs, regardless of length, quality, or quantity, is that there is little information that can be annotated in the record. If a sequence is later characterized and annotated with biological features such as a coding region, 5'UTR, or 3'UTR, it should be submitted through the regular GenBank submissions procedure (via BankIt or Sequin), even if part of the sequence is already in dbEST. dbEST is reserved for single-pass reads. Assembled sequences should not be submitted to dbEST. GenBank will accept assembled EST submissions for the forthcoming TSA (Transcriptome Shotgun Assembly) division. The individual reads which make up the assembly should be submitted to dbEST, the Trace archive or the Short Read Archive (SRA) prior to the submission of the assemblies.
This project is an open invitation to anyone and everyone to participate in a decentralized effort to explore the opportunities of open science in neuroimaging. We aim to document how much (scientific) value can be generated from a data release — from the publication of scientific findings derived from this dataset, algorithms and methods evaluated on this dataset, and/or extensions of this dataset by acquisition and incorporation of new data. The project involves the processing of acoustic stimuli. In this study, the scientists have demonstrated an audiodescription of classic "Forrest Gump" to subjects, while researchers using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have captured the brain activity of test candidates in the processing of language, music, emotions, memories and pictorial representations.In collaboration with various labs in Magdeburg we acquired and published what is probably the most comprehensive sample of brain activation patterns of natural language processing. Volunteers listened to a two-hour audio movie version of the Hollywood feature film "Forrest Gump" in a 7T MRI scanner. High-resolution brain activation patterns and physiological measurements were recorded continuously. These data have been placed into the public domain, and are freely available to the scientific community and the general public.
The Museum is committed to open access and open science, and has launched the Data Portal to make its research and collections datasets available online. It allows anyone to explore, download and reuse the data for their own research. Our natural history collection is one of the most important in the world, documenting 4.5 billion years of life, the Earth and the solar system. Almost all animal, plant, mineral and fossil groups are represented. These datasets will increase exponentially. Under the Museum's ambitious digital collections programme we aim to have 20 million specimens digitised in the next five years.
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Edmond is the institutional repository of the Max Planck Society for public research data. It enables Max Planck scientists to create citable scientific assets by describing, enriching, sharing, exposing, linking, publishing and archiving research data of all kinds. A unique feature of Edmond is the dedicated metadata management, which supports a non-restrictive metadata schema definition, as simple as you like or as complex as your parameters require. Further on, all objects within Edmond have a unique identifier and therefore can be clearly referenced in publications or reused in other contexts.
The Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC) is a coalition of investigators seeking to aggregate and harmonize exome sequencing data from a wide variety of large-scale sequencing projects, and to make summary data available for the wider scientific community. The data set provided on this website spans 60,706 unrelated individuals sequenced as part of various disease-specific and population genetic studies.
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GSA is a data repository specialized for archiving raw sequence reads. It supports data generated from a variety of sequencing platforms ranging from Sanger sequencing machines to single-cell sequencing machines and provides data storing and sharing services free of charge for worldwide scientific communities. In addition to raw sequencing data, GSA also accommodates secondary analyzed files in acceptable formats (like BAM, VCF). Its user-friendly web interfaces simplify data entry and submitted data are roughly organized as two parts, viz., Metadata and File, where the former can be further assorted into BioProject, BioSample, Experiment and Run, and the latter contains raw sequence reads.
We are developing an open, online platform to provide a seamless access to cloud computing infrastructure and brain data and data derivatives. This platform is meant to reach out beyond neuroscience, allowing also computer scientists, statisticians and engineers interested in brain data to use the data to develop and publish their methods. Brain Life is a project under active development. We currently offer several cloud computing services – also called Brain Life Applications. Sixty-six collaborators from global scientific communities contribute to the project by providing data, applications, technology and products to advance understanding the human brain.
The OpenfMRI project was established in 2010 to provide a resource for researchers interested in making their fMRI data openly available to the research community. It is managed by Russ Poldrack at the University of Texas at Austin, with computing resources provided by the Texas Advanced Computing Center. The OpenfMRI project is funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation.
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The Cognitive Interaction Toolkit provides a unified view on linked research artifacts of collaborating institutions in the Bielefeld University’s strategic research area Interactive Intelligent Systems. It binds together a framework for software integration, software and hardware components, system descriptions, experiments, data sets, and publications. The research artifacts are hosted at a distributed service infrastructure that includes project oriented collaboration platforms, opensource and opendata servers, continuous integration services, and publication data servers. These are accessible via this web catalog defining a central collaborative instance for integrated research efforts.