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Found 12 result(s)
The Universitat de Barcelona Digital Repository is an institutional resource containing open-access digital versions of publications related to the teaching, research and institutional activities of the UB's teaching staff and other members of the university community, including research data.
The objective of this Research Coordination Network project is to develop an international network of researchers who use genetic methodologies to study the ecology and evolution of marine organisms in the Indo-Pacific to share data, ideas and methods. DIPnet was created to advance genetic diversity research in the Indo-Pacific by aggregating population genetic metadata into a searchable database (GeOME).
Edmond is the institutional repository of the Max Planck Society for public research data. It enables Max Planck scientists to create citable scientific assets by describing, enriching, sharing, exposing, linking, publishing and archiving research data of all kinds. A unique feature of Edmond is the dedicated metadata management, which supports a non-restrictive metadata schema definition, as simple as you like or as complex as your parameters require. Further on, all objects within Edmond have a unique identifier and therefore can be clearly referenced in publications or reused in other contexts.
The Museum is committed to open access and open science, and has launched the Data Portal to make its research and collections datasets available online. It allows anyone to explore, download and reuse the data for their own research. Our natural history collection is one of the most important in the world, documenting 4.5 billion years of life, the Earth and the solar system. Almost all animal, plant, mineral and fossil groups are represented. These datasets will increase exponentially. Under the Museum's ambitious digital collections programme we aim to have 20 million specimens digitised in the next five years.
BioModels Database is a repository of peer-reviewed, published, computational models that allows biologists to store, search and retrieve published mathematical models from the field of systems biology, but also more generally those of biological interest. Models in the database can be used to generate sub-models, can be simulated online, and can be converted between different representational formats.
Biological collections are replete with taxonomic, geographic, temporal, numerical, and historical information. This information is crucial for understanding and properly managing biodiversity and ecosystems, but is often difficult to access. Canadensys, operated from the Université de Montréal Biodiversity Centre, is a Canada-wide effort to unlock the biodiversity information held in biological collections.
The Harvard Dataverse is open to all scientific data from all disciplines worldwide. It includes the world's largest collection of social science research data. It is hosting data for projects, archives, researchers, journals, organizations, and institutions.
This DOI repository provides permanent identifiers to data sets generated by Life Science researchers active in Sweden, and for which no other suitable public repository is available. BILS is a distributed national research infrastructure supported by the Swedish Research Council (Vetenskapsrådet) providing bioinformatics support to life science researchers in Sweden.
The Integrated Resource for Reproducibility in Macromolecular Crystallography includes a repository system and website designed to make the raw data of protein crystallography more widely available. Our focus is on identifying, cataloging and providing the metadata related to datasets, which could be used to reprocess the original diffraction data. The intent behind this project is to make the resulting three dimensional structures more reproducible and easier to modify and improve as processing methods advance.
The OpenNeuro project (formerly known as the OpenfMRI project) was established in 2010 to provide a resource for researchers interested in making their neuroimaging data openly available to the research community. It is managed by Russ Poldrack and Chris Gorgolewski of the Center for Reproducible Neuroscience at Stanford University. The project has been developed with funding from the National Science Foundation, National Institute of Drug Abuse, and the Laura and John Arnold Foundation.