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Found 36 result(s)
Peptidome was a public repository that archived tandem mass spectrometry peptide and protein identification data generated by the scientific community. This repository is now offline and is in archival mode. All data may be obtained from the Peptidome FTP site. Due to budgetary constraints NCBI has discontinued the Peptidome Repository. All existing data and metadata files will continue to be made available from our ftp server a ftp://ftp.ncbi.nih.gov/pub/peptidome/ indefinitely. Those files are named according to their Peptidome accession number, allowing cited data to be identified and downloaded. All of the Peptidome studies have been made publicly available at the PRoteomics IDEntifications (PRIDE) database. A map of Peptidome to Pride accessions may be found at ftp://ftp.ncbi.nih.gov/pub/peptidome/peptidome-pride_map.txt. If you have any specific questions, please feel free to contact us at info@ncbi.nlm.nih.gov.
The UniProt Knowledgebase (UniProtKB) is the central hub for the collection of functional information on proteins, with accurate, consistent and rich annotation. In addition to capturing the core data mandatory for each UniProtKB entry (mainly, the amino acid sequence, protein name or description, taxonomic data and citation information), as much annotation information as possible is added. This includes widely accepted biological ontologies, classifications and cross-references, and clear indications of the quality of annotation in the form of evidence attribution of experimental and computational data. The Universal Protein Resource (UniProt) is a comprehensive resource for protein sequence and annotation data. The UniProt databases are the UniProt Knowledgebase (UniProtKB), the UniProt Reference Clusters (UniRef), and the UniProt Archive (UniParc). The UniProt Metagenomic and Environmental Sequences (UniMES) database is a repository specifically developed for metagenomic and environmental data. The UniProt Knowledgebase,is an expertly and richly curated protein database, consisting of two sections called UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot and UniProtKB/TrEMBL.
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A human interactome map. The sequencing of the human genome has provided a surprisingly small number of genes, indicating that the complex organization of life is not reflected in the gene number but, rather, in the gene products – that is, in the proteins. These macromolecules regulate the vast majority of cellular processes by their ability to communicate with each other and to assemble into larger functional units. Therefore, the systematic analysis of protein-protein interactions is fundamental for the understanding of protein function, cellular processes and, ultimately, the complexity of life. Moreover, interactome maps are particularly needed to link new proteins to disease pathways and the identification of novel drug targets.
FungiDB belongs to the EuPathDB family of databases and is an integrated genomic and functional genomic database for the kingdom Fungi. FungiDB was first released in early 2011 as a collaborative project between EuPathDB and the group of Jason Stajich (University of California, Riverside). At the end of 2015, FungiDB was integrated into the EuPathDB bioinformatic resource center. FungiDB integrates whole genome sequence and annotation and also includes experimental and environmental isolate sequence data. The database includes comparative genomics, analysis of gene expression, and supplemental bioinformatics analyses and a web interface for data-mining.
METLIN represents the largest MS/MS collection of data with the database generated at multiple collision energies and in positive and negative ionization modes. The data is generated on multiple instrument types including SCIEX, Agilent, Bruker and Waters QTOF mass spectrometers.
The European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) has a long-standing mission to collect, organise and make available databases for biomolecular science. It makes available a collection of databases along with tools to search, download and analyse their content. These databases include DNA and protein sequences and structures, genome annotation, gene expression information, molecular interactions and pathways. Connected to these are linking and descriptive data resources such as protein motifs, ontologies and many others. In many of these efforts, the EBI is a European node in global data-sharing agreements involving, for example, the USA and Japan.
The IMEx consortium is an international collaboration between a group of major public interaction data providers who have agreed to share curation effort and develop and work to a single set of curation rules when capturing data from both directly deposited interaction data or from publications in peer-reviewed journals, capture full details of an interaction in a “deep” curation model, perform a complete curation of all protein-protein interactions experimentally demonstrated within a publication, make these interaction available in a single search interface on a common website, provide the data in standards compliant download formats, make all IMEx records freely accessible under the Creative Commons Attribution License
Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (SIB) coordinates research and education in bioinformatics throughout Switzerland and provides bioinformatics services to the national and international research community. ExPASy gives access to numerous repositories and databases of SIB. For example: array map, MetaNetX, SWISS-MODEL and World-2DPAGE, and many others see a list here http://www.expasy.org/resources
The PeptideAtlas validates expressed proteins to provide eukaryotic genome data. Peptide Atlas provides data to advance biological discoveries in humans. The PeptideAtlas accepts proteomic data from high-throughput processes and encourages data submission.
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The main objective of our work is to understand the pathomechanisms of late onset neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's, Parkinson's, Alzheimer's and Machado Joseph disease and to develop causal therapies for them. The disease causing proteins of these illnesses have been identified, but their functions in the unaffected organism are mostly unknown. Here, we have developed a strategy combining library and matrix yeast two-hybrid screens to generate a highly connected PPI network for Huntington's disease (HD).
The PRIDE PRoteomics IDEntifications database is a centralized, standards compliant, public data repository for proteomics data, including protein and peptide identifications, post-translational modifications and supporting spectral evidence. PRIDE encourages and welcomes direct user submissions of mass spectrometry data to be published in peer-reviewed publications.
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jPOSTrepo (Japan ProteOme STandard Repository) is a repository of sharing MS raw/processed data. It consists of a high-speed file upload process, flexible file management system and easy-to-use interfaces. Users can release their "raw/processed" data via this site with a unique identifier number for the paper publication. Users also can suspend (or "embargo") their data until their paper is published. The file transfer from users’ computer to our repository server is very fast (roughly ten times faster than usual file transfer) and uses only web browsers – it does not require installing any additional software.
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MyTardis began at Monash University to solve the problem of users needing to store large datasets and share them with collaborators online. Its particular focus is on integration with scientific instruments, instrument facilities and research lab file storage. Our belief is that the less effort a researcher has to expend safely storing data, the more likely they are to do so. This approach has flourished with MyTardis capturing data from areas such as protein crystallography, electron microscopy, medical imaging and proteomics and with deployments at Australian institutions such as University of Queensland, RMIT, University of Sydney and the Australian Synchrotron. Data access via https://mytardis.massive.org.au/ and http://vera183.its.monash.edu.au/public_data/ and see 'remarks'.
The MG-RAST server is an open source system for annotation and comparative analysis of metagenomes. Users can upload raw sequence data in fasta format; the sequences will be normalized and processed and summaries automatically generated. The server provides several methods to access the different data types, including phylogenetic and metabolic reconstructions, and the ability to compare the metabolism and annotations of one or more metagenomes and genomes. In addition, the server offers a comprehensive search capability. Access to the data is password protected, and all data generated by the automated pipeline is available for download in a variety of common formats. MG-RAST has become an unofficial repository for metagenomic data, providing a means to make your data public so that it is available for download and viewing of the analysis without registration, as well as a static link that you can use in publications. It also requires that you include experimental metadata about your sample when it is made public to increase the usefulness to the community.
The Protein Circular Dichroism Data Bank (PCDDB) provides and accepts a circular dichroism spectra data. The PCDDB and it's parent organization, the Institute of Structural and Molecular Biology (ISMB), investigate molecular structure using techniques such as biomolecular nuclear magnetic resonance, X-ray crystallography and computational structure prediction, as methods for protein production and biological characterization.
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CORUM is a manually curated dataset of mammalian protein complexes. Annotation of protein complexes includes protein complex composition and other valuable information such as method of purification, cellular function of complexes or involvement in diseases.
The ProteomeXchange consortium has been set up to provide a single point of submission of MS proteomics data to the main existing proteomics repositories, and to encourage the data exchange between them for optimal data dissemination. Current members accepting submissions are: The PRIDE PRoteomics IDEntifications database at the European Bioinformatics Institute focusing mainly on shotgun mass spectrometry proteomics data PeptideAtlas/PASSEL focusing on SRM/MRM datasets.
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The Swedish Human Protein Atlas project has been set up to allow for a systematic exploration of the human proteome using Antibody-Based Proteomics. This is accomplished by combining high-throughput generation of affinity-purified antibodies with protein profiling in a multitude of tissues and cells assembled in tissue microarrays. Confocal microscopy analysis using human cell lines is performed for more detailed protein localization. The program hosts the Human Protein Atlas portal with expression profiles of human proteins in tissues and cells. The main objective of the resource centre is to produce specific antibodies to human target proteins using a high-throughput production method involving the cloning and protein expression of Protein Epitope Signature Tags (PrESTs). After purification, the antibodies are used to study expression profiles in cells and tissues and for functional analysis of the corresponding proteins in a wide range of platforms.
PDBj (Protein Data Bank Japan) provides a centralized PDB archive of macromolecular structures, integrated tools for data retrieval, visualization, and functional characterization. PDBj is supported by JST-NBDC and Osaka University.
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GABI, acronym for "Genomanalyse im biologischen System Pflanze", is the name of a large collaborative network of different plant genomic research projects. Plant data from different ‘omics’ fronts representing more than 10 different model or crop species are integrated in GabiPD.
The Protein Data Bank (PDB) is an archive of experimentally determined three-dimensional structures of biological macromolecules that serves a global community of researchers, educators, and students. The data contained in the archive include atomic coordinates, crystallographic structure factors and NMR experimental data. Aside from coordinates, each deposition also includes the names of molecules, primary and secondary structure information, sequence database references, where appropriate, and ligand and biological assembly information, details about data collection and structure solution, and bibliographic citations. The Worldwide Protein Data Bank (wwPDB) consists of organizations that act as deposition, data processing and distribution centers for PDB data. Members are: RCSB PDB (USA), PDBe (Europe) and PDBj (Japan), and BMRB (USA). The wwPDB's mission is to maintain a single PDB archive of macromolecular structural data that is freely and publicly available to the global community.
EuPathDB (formerly ApiDB) is an integrated database covering the eukaryotic pathogens in the genera Acanthamoeba, Annacaliia, Babesia, Crithidia, Cryptosporidium, Edhazardia, Eimeria, Encephalitozoon, Endotrypanum, Entamoeba, Enterocytozoon, Giardia, Gregarina, Hamiltosporidium, Leishmania, Nematocida, Neospora, Nosema, Plasmodium, Theileria, Toxoplasma, Trichomonas, Trypanosoma and Vavraia, Vittaforma). While each of these groups is supported by a taxon-specific database built upon the same infrastructure, the EuPathDB portal offers an entry point to all of these resources, and the opportunity to leverage orthology for searches across genera.
HumanCyc provides an encyclopedic reference on human metabolic pathways. It provides a zoomable human metabolic map diagram, and it has been used to generate a steady-state quantitative model of human metabolism.