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Found 65 result(s)
ForestPlots.net is a web-accessible secure repository for forest plot inventories in South America, Africa and Asia. The database includes plot geographical information; location, taxonomic information and diameter measurements of trees inside each plot; and participants in plot establishment and re-measurement, including principal investigators, field assistants, students.
Country
The project brings together national key players providing environmentally related biological data and services to develop the ‘German Federation for Biological Data' (GFBio). The overall goal is to provide a sustainable, service oriented, national data infrastructure facilitating data sharing and stimulating data intensive science in the fields of biological and environmental research.
Country
The Ningaloo Atlas was created in response to the need for more comprehensive and accessible information on environmental and socio-economic data on the greater Ningaloo region. As such, the Ningaloo Atlas is a web portal to not only access and share information, but to celebrate and promote the biodiversity, heritage, value, and way of life of the greater Ningaloo region.
The PLANKTON*NET data provider at the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research is an open access repository for plankton-related information. It covers all types of phytoplankton and zooplankton from marine and freshwater areas. PLANKTON*NET's greatest strength is its comprehensiveness as for the different taxa image information as well as taxonomic descriptions can be archived. PLANKTON*NET also contains a glossary with accompanying images to illustrate the term definitions. PLANKTON*NET therefore presents a vital tool for the preservation of historic data sets as well as the archival of current research results. Because interoperability with international biodiversity data providers (e.g. GBIF) is one of our aims, the architecture behind the new planktonnet@awi repository is observation centric and allows for mulitple assignment of assets (images, references, animations, etc) to any given observation. In addition, images can be grouped in sets and/or assigned tags to satisfy user-specific needs . Sets (and respective images) of relevance to the scientific community and/or general public have been assigned a persistant digital object identifier (DOI) for the purpose of long-term preservation (e.g. set ""Plankton*Net celebrates 50 years of Roman Treaties"", handle: 10013/de.awi.planktonnet.set.495)"
The tree of life links all biodiversity through a shared evolutionary history. This project will produce the first online, comprehensive first-draft tree of all 1.8 million named species, accessible to both the public and scientific communities. Assembly of the tree will incorporate previously-published results, with strong collaborations between computational and empirical biologists to develop, test and improve methods of data synthesis. This initial tree of life will not be static; instead, we will develop tools for scientists to update and revise the tree as new data come in. Early release of the tree and tools will motivate data sharing and facilitate ongoing synthesis of knowledge.
The objective of this Research Coordination Network project is to develop an international network of researchers who use genetic methodologies to study the ecology and evolution of marine organisms in the Indo-Pacific to share data, ideas and methods. The tropical Indian and Pacific Oceans encompass the largest biogeographic region on the planet, the Indo-Pacific
The Fish Database of Taiwan is a complex of research data for about 25 years to the Lab of Fish Ecology and Evolution, which is situated in Biodiversity Research Center of Academia Sinica.
Our knowledge of the many life-forms on Earth - of animals, plants, fungi, protists and bacteria - is scattered around the world in books, journals, databases, websites, specimen collections, and in the minds of people everywhere. Imagine what it would mean if this information could be gathered together and made available to everyone – anywhere – at a moment’s notice. This dream is becoming a reality through the Encyclopedia of Life.
VegBank is the vegetation plot database of the Ecological Society of America's Panel on Vegetation Classification. VegBank consists of three linked databases that contain the actual plot records, vegetation types recognized in the U.S. National Vegetation Classification and other vegetation types submitted by users, and all plant taxa recognized by ITIS/USDA as well as all other plant taxa recorded in plot records. Vegetation records, community types and plant taxa may be submitted to VegBank and may be subsequently searched, viewed, annotated, revised, interpreted, downloaded, and cited. VegBank receives its data from the VegBank community of users.
The Brain Biodiversity Bank refers to the repository of images of and information about brain specimens contained in the collections associated with the National Museum of Health and Medicine at the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology in Washington, DC. These collections include, besides the Michigan State University Collection, the Welker Collection from the University of Wisconsin, the Yakovlev-Haleem Collection from Harvard University, the Meyer Collection from the Johns Hopkins University, and the Huber-Crosby and Crosby-Lauer Collections from the University of Michigan and the C.U. Ariëns Kappers brain collection from Amsterdam Netherlands.Introducing online atlases of the brains of humans, sheep, dolphins, and other animals. A world resource for illustrations of whole brains and stained sections from a great variety of mammals
Country
GBIF is an international organisation that is working to make the world's biodiversity data accessible everywhere in the world. GBIF and its many partners work to mobilize the data, and to improve search mechanisms, data and metadata standards, web services, and the other components of an Internet-based information infrastructure for biodiversity. GBIF makes available data that are shared by hundreds of data publishers from around the world. These data are shared according to the GBIF Data Use Agreement, which includes the provision that users of any data accessed through or retrieved via the GBIF Portal will always give credit to the original data publishers.
VertNet is a NSF-funded collaborative project that makes biodiversity data free and available on the web. VertNet is a tool designed to help people discover, capture, and publish biodiversity data. It is also the core of a collaboration between hundreds of biocollections that contribute biodiversity data and work together to improve it. VertNet is an engine for training current and future professionals to use and build upon best practices in data quality, curation, research, and data publishing. Yet, VertNet is still the aggregate of all of the information that it mobilizes. To us, VertNet is all of these things and more.
This site offers an enormous collection of photographs of wild species and natural history objects. It covers most groups of organisms with the exception of birds and other vertebrates. The photographs are presented to illustrate biodiversity and as an aid to identification. The criterion for inclusion of a species is that it must have been, or might be expected to be, found in Britain or Ireland. BioImages follows the biological classification. This is a hierarchical system with species grouped in genera, genera in families, families in orders and so on up to kingdoms and superkingdoms. Biota takes you to the top of the classification tree.
The CBIF provides primary data on biological species of interest to Canadians. CBIF supports a wide range of social and economic decisions including efforts to conserve our biodiversity in healthy ecosystems, use our biological resources in sustainable ways, and monitor and control pests and diseases. Tools provided by the CBIF include the Integrated Taxonomic Information System (ITIS), Species Access Network, Online Mapping, and the SpeciesBank, including Butterflies of Canada. The CBIF is a member of the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF).
Country
The Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research (IPK) and the German Plant Phenotyping Network (DPPN) has jointly initiated the Plant Genomics and Phenomics Research Data Repository (PGP) as infrastructure to comprehensively publish plant research data. This covers in particular these cross-domain data sets that are not being published in central repositories because of its huge volume, unsupported data domain or scope, like image collections from plant phenotyping and microscopy, unassembled sequences, genotyping data, visualizations of complex morphological plant models, movies plant 3-D models, raw data from mass spectrometry, software, and documents. Accepted data is published as citable DOIs and core set of technical metadata is registered at DataCite. The used e!DAL-embedded Web frontend generates for each data set a landing page and supports an interactive exploration of available datasets. This long-term stable access to plant genomic and phenomic primary data records across domains and laboratories in one repository can empower researchers to reproduce already published analysis results as well as performing subsequent, advanced studies.
This interface provides access to several types of data related to the Chesapeake Bay. Bay Program databases can be queried based upon user-defined inputs such as geographic region and date range. Each query results in a downloadable, tab- or comma-delimited text file that can be imported to any program (e.g., SAS, Excel, Access) for further analysis. Comments regarding the interface are encouraged. Questions in reference to the data should be addressed to the contact provided on subsequent pages.
Antarctic marine and terrestrial biodiversity data is widely scattered, patchy and often not readily accessible. In many cases the data is in danger of being irretrievably lost. Biodiversity.aq establishes and supports a distributed system of interoperable databases, giving easy access through a single internet portal to a set of resources relevant to research, conservation and management pertaining to Antarctic biodiversity. biodiversity.aq provides access to both marine and terrestrial Antarctic biodiversity data.
The Landcare Research DataStore ('the DataStore') is the general data catalogue and repository for Environmental Research Data from Landcare Research. Much of Landcare Research’s research data is available through specific web pages, but many datasets sit outside these areas. This new data repository provides a mechanism for our staff to deposit and document this wider range of datasets so that they may be discovered and potentially re-used.
GLOBE (Global Collaboration Engine) is an online collaborative environment that enables land change researchers to share, compare and integrate local and regional studies with global data to assess the global relevance of their work.
This is a database for vegetation data from West Africa, i.e. phytosociological and dendrometric relevés as well as floristic inventories. The West African Vegetation Database has been developed in the framework of the projects “Sustainable Use of Natural Vegetation in West Africa” (SUN, http://www.sunproject.dk/) and “Biodiversity Transect Analysis in Africa” (BIOTA, http://www.biota-africa.org/).
The Museum is committed to open access and open science, and has launched the Data Portal to make its research and collections datasets available online. It allows anyone to explore, download and reuse the data for their own research. Our natural history collection is one of the most important in the world, documenting 4.5 billion years of life, the Earth and the solar system. Almost all animal, plant, mineral and fossil groups are represented. These datasets will increase exponentially. Under the Museum's ambitious digital collections programme we aim to have 20 million specimens digitised in the next five years.