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Found 71 result(s)
The Entrez Protein Clusters database contains annotation information, publications, structures and analysis tools for related protein sequences encoded by complete genomes. The data available in the Protein Clusters Database is generated from prokaryotic genomic studies and is intended to assist researchers studying micro-organism evolution as well as other biological sciences. Available genomes include plants and viruses as well as organelles and microbial genomes.
Clone DB contains information about genomic clones and cDNA and cell-based libraries for eukaryotic organisms. The database integrates this information with sequence data, map positions, and distributor information. At this time, Clone DB contains records for genomic clones and libraries, the collection of MICER mouse gene targeting clones and cell-based gene trap and gene targeting libraries from the International Knockout Mouse Consortium, Lexicon and the International Gene Trap Consortium. A planned expansion for Clone DB will add records for additional gene targeting and gene trap clones, as well as cDNA clones.
FungiDB belongs to the EuPathDB family of databases and is an integrated genomic and functional genomic database for the kingdom Fungi. FungiDB was first released in early 2011 as a collaborative project between EuPathDB and the group of Jason Stajich (University of California, Riverside). At the end of 2015, FungiDB was integrated into the EuPathDB bioinformatic resource center. FungiDB integrates whole genome sequence and annotation and also includes experimental and environmental isolate sequence data. The database includes comparative genomics, analysis of gene expression, and supplemental bioinformatics analyses and a web interface for data-mining.
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The Autism Chromosome Rearrangement Database is a collection of hand curated breakpoints and other genomic features, related to autism, taken from publicly available literature: databases and unpublished data. The database is continuously updated with information from in-house experimental data as well as data from published research studies.
The ISSAID website gathers resources related to the systemic autoinflammatory diseases in order to facilitate contacts between interested physicians and researchers. The website provides support to share and rapidly disseminate information, thoughts, feelings and experiences to improve the quality of life of patients and families affected by systemic autoinflammatory diseases, and promote advances in the search for causes and cures.
The European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) has a long-standing mission to collect, organise and make available databases for biomolecular science. It makes available a collection of databases along with tools to search, download and analyse their content. These databases include DNA and protein sequences and structures, genome annotation, gene expression information, molecular interactions and pathways. Connected to these are linking and descriptive data resources such as protein motifs, ontologies and many others. In many of these efforts, the EBI is a European node in global data-sharing agreements involving, for example, the USA and Japan.
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JASPAR is the leading open-access database of matrix profiles describing the DNA-binding patterns of transcription factors and other proteins interacting with DNA in a sequence-specific manner.
DNASU is a central repository for plasmid clones and collections. Currently we store and distribute over 200,000 plasmids including 75,000 human and mouse plasmids, full genome collections, the protein expression plasmids from the Protein Structure Initiative as the PSI: Biology Material Repository (PSI : Biology-MR), and both small and large collections from individual researchers. We are also a founding member and distributor of the ORFeome Collaboration plasmid collection.
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The Organelle Genome Megasequencing Program (OGMP) provides mitochondrial, chloroplast, and mitochondrial plasmid genome data. OGMP tools allow direct comparison of OGMP and NCBI validated records. Includes GOBASE, a taxonomically broad organelle genome database that organizes and integrates diverse data related to mitochondria and chloroplasts.
>>>!!!<<< SMD has been retired. After approximately fifteen years of microarray-centric research service, the Stanford Microarray Database has been retired. We apologize for any inconvenience; please read below for possible resolutions to your queries. If you are looking for any raw data that was directly linked to SMD from a manuscript, please search one of the public repositories. NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus EBI ArrayExpress All published data were previously communicated to one (or both) of the public repositories. Alternatively, data for publications between 1997 and 2004 were likely migrated to the Princeton University MicroArray Database, and are accessible there. If you are looking for a manuscript supplement (i.e. from a domain other than smd.stanford.edu), perhaps try searching the Internet Archive: Wayback Machine https://archive.org/web/ . >>>!!!<<< The Stanford Microarray Database (SMD) is a DNA microarray research database that provides a large amount of data for public use.
Online Mendelian Inheritance in Animals (OMIA) is a catalogue/compendium of inherited disorders, other (single-locus) traits, and genes in 218 animal species (other than human and mouse and rats, which have their own resources) authored by Professor Frank Nicholas of the University of Sydney, Australia, with help from many people over the years. OMIA information is stored in a database that contains textual information and references, as well as links to relevant PubMed and Gene records at the NCBI, and to OMIM and Ensembl.
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It captures and catalogues ancient human genome and microbiome data, including raw sequence and processed data, along with metadata about its provenance and production. Included datasets are generated from ancient samples studied at the Australian Centre for Ancient DNA, University of Adelaide in collaboration with other research groups. Datasets and collections in OAGR are open data resources made freely available in a reusable form, using open file formats and licensed with minimal restrictions for reuse. Digital object identifiers (DOIs) are minted for included datasets and collections to facilitate persistent identification and citation.
dbEST is a division of GenBank that contains sequence data and other information on "single-pass" cDNA sequences, or "Expressed Sequence Tags", from a number of organisms. Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) are short (usually about 300-500 bp), single-pass sequence reads from mRNA (cDNA). Typically they are produced in large batches. They represent a snapshot of genes expressed in a given tissue and/or at a given developmental stage. They are tags (some coding, others not) of expression for a given cDNA library. Most EST projects develop large numbers of sequences. These are commonly submitted to GenBank and dbEST as batches of dozens to thousands of entries, with a great deal of redundancy in the citation, submitter and library information. To improve the efficiency of the submission process for this type of data, we have designed a special streamlined submission process and data format. dbEST also includes sequences that are longer than the traditional ESTs, or are produced as single sequences or in small batches. Among these sequences are products of differential display experiments and RACE experiments. The thing that these sequences have in common with traditional ESTs, regardless of length, quality, or quantity, is that there is little information that can be annotated in the record. If a sequence is later characterized and annotated with biological features such as a coding region, 5'UTR, or 3'UTR, it should be submitted through the regular GenBank submissions procedure (via BankIt or Sequin), even if part of the sequence is already in dbEST. dbEST is reserved for single-pass reads. Assembled sequences should not be submitted to dbEST. GenBank will accept assembled EST submissions for the forthcoming TSA (Transcriptome Shotgun Assembly) division. The individual reads which make up the assembly should be submitted to dbEST, the Trace archive or the Short Read Archive (SRA) prior to the submission of the assemblies.
The Gene database provides detailed information for known and predicted genes defined by nucleotide sequence or map position. Gene supplies gene-specific connections in the nexus of map, sequence, expression, structure, function, citation, and homology data. Unique identifiers are assigned to genes with defining sequences, genes with known map positions, and genes inferred from phenotypic information. These gene identifiers are used throughout NCBI's databases and tracked through updates of annotation. Gene includes genomes represented by NCBI Reference Sequences (or RefSeqs) and is integrated for indexing and query and retrieval from NCBI's Entrez and E-Utilities systems.
The Database of Genomic Variants archive provides curated archiving and distribution of publicly available genomic structural variants. Direct submissions are accepted as well as published data. The DGVa is the primary supplier of data to the Database of Genomic Variants (DGV) (hosted by The Centre for Applied Genomics in Toronto, Canada).
The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Data Portal provides a platform for researchers to search, download, and analyze data sets generated by TCGA. It contains clinical information, genomic characterization data, and high level sequence analysis of the tumor genomes. The Data Coordinating Center (DCC) is the central provider of TCGA data. The DCC standardizes data formats and validates submitted data.
dictyBase is an integrated genetic and literature database that contains published Dictyostelium discoideum literature, genes, expressed sequence tags (ESTs), as well as the chromosomal and mitochondrial genome sequences. Direct access to the genome browser, a Blast search tool, the Dictyostelium Stock Center, research tools, colleague databases, and much much more are just a mouse click away. Dictybase is a genome portal for the Amoebozoa. dictyBase is funded by a grant from the National Institute for General Medical Sciences.
The PeptideAtlas validates expressed proteins to provide eukaryotic genome data. Peptide Atlas provides data to advance biological discoveries in humans. The PeptideAtlas accepts proteomic data from high-throughput processes and encourages data submission.
MycoCosm, the DOE JGI’s web-based fungal genomics resource, which integrates fungal genomics data and analytical tools for fungal biologists. It provides navigation through sequenced genomes, genome analysis in context of comparative genomics and genome-centric view. MycoCosm promotes user community participation in data submission, annotation and analysis.
The Brain Transcriptome Database (BrainTx) project aims to create an integrated platform to visualize and analyze our original transcriptome data and publicly accessible transcriptome data related to the genetics that underlie the development, function, and dysfunction stages and states of the brain.
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The Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research (IPK) and the German Plant Phenotyping Network (DPPN) has jointly initiated the Plant Genomics and Phenomics Research Data Repository (PGP) as infrastructure to comprehensively publish plant research data. This covers in particular these cross-domain data sets that are not being published in central repositories because of its huge volume, unsupported data domain or scope, like image collections from plant phenotyping and microscopy, unassembled sequences, genotyping data, visualizations of complex morphological plant models, movies plant 3-D models, raw data from mass spectrometry, software, and documents. Accepted data is published as citable DOIs and core set of technical metadata is registered at DataCite. The used e!DAL-embedded Web frontend generates for each data set a landing page and supports an interactive exploration of available datasets. This long-term stable access to plant genomic and phenomic primary data records across domains and laboratories in one repository can empower researchers to reproduce already published analysis results as well as performing subsequent, advanced studies.
This library is a public and easily accessible resource database of images, videos, and animations of cells, capturing a wide diversity of organisms, cell types, and cellular processes. The purpose of this database is to advance research on cellular activity, with the ultimate goal of improving human health.