Filter
Reset all

Subjects

Content Types

Countries

AID systems

API

Certificates

Data access

Data access restrictions

Database access

Database access restrictions

Database licenses

Data licenses

Data upload

Data upload restrictions

Enhanced publication

Institution responsibility type

Institution type

Keywords

Metadata standards

PID systems

Provider types

Quality management

Repository languages

Software

Syndications

Repository types

Versioning

  • * at the end of a keyword allows wildcard searches
  • " quotes can be used for searching phrases
  • + represents an AND search (default)
  • | represents an OR search
  • - represents a NOT operation
  • ( and ) implies priority
  • ~N after a word specifies the desired edit distance (fuzziness)
  • ~N after a phrase specifies the desired slop amount
Found 31 result(s)
MTSA is a Metropolitan Travel Survey Archive to store, preserve, and make publicly available, via the internet, travel surveys conducted by metropolitan areas, states and localities. As a result of cooperation from several agencies, we now have been able to post databases along with relevant documentation for many regions in the archive http://www.surveyarchive.org/archive.html . The databases and the documentation can be obtained from this website. In addition to making these databases publicly available, we are also in the process of converting all the databases to a common format to enhance the readability and usability of each survey, so many surveys can be used online, see analyze http://www.surveyarchive.org/analyze.html. The results from the first year of the project, along with issues related to archiving travel survey data are provided in our reports page http://www.surveyarchive.org/reports.html . Papers written by Yacov Zahavi, an instrumental figure in the development of travel surveys, are also provided here.
The NCAA Student-Athlete Experiences Data Archive provides access to data about student athletes and will grow to include a handful of user-friendly data collections related to graduation rates; team-level Academic Progress Rates in Division I; and individual-level data on the experiences of current and former student-athletes from the NCAA's Growth, Opportunities, Aspirations and Learning of Students in college study (GOALS), and the Study of College Outcomes and Recent Experiences (SCORE). In the long run, the NCAA expects to follow this initial release with the publication of as much data as possible from its archives. The data is used by college presidents, athletic personnel, faculty, student-athlete groups, media members, and researchers in looking at issues related to intercollegiate athletics and higher education.
TeachingWithData.org is a portal where faculty can find resources and ideas to reduce the challenges of bringing real data into post-secondary classes. It allows faculty to introduce and build students' quantitative reasoning abilities with readily available, user-friendly, data-driven teaching materials.
The HSRC Research Data Service provides a digital repository facility for the HSRC's research data in support of evidence based human and social development in South Africa and the broader region. It includes both quantitative and qualitative data. Access to data is dependent on ethical requirements for protecting research participants, as well as on legal agreements with the owners, funders or in the case of data owned by the HSRC, the requirements of the depositors of the data.
NACDA acquires and preserves data relevant to gerontological research, processing as needed to promote effective research use, disseminates them to researchers, and facilitates their use. By preserving and making available the largest library of electronic data on aging in the United States, NACDA offers opportunities for secondary analysis on major issues of scientific and policy relevance
The Henry A. Murray Research Archive is Harvard's endowed, permanent repository for quantitative and qualitative research data at the Institute for Quantitative Social Science, and provides physical storage for the entire IQSS Dataverse Network. Our collection comprises over 100 terabytes of data, audio, and video. We preserve in perpetuity all types of data of interest to the research community, including numerical, video, audio, interview notes, and other data. We accept data deposits through this web site, which is powered by our Dataverse Network software
ICPSR maintains a data archive of more than 250,000 files of research in the social and behavioral sciences. It hosts 21 specialized collections of data in education, aging, criminal justice, substance abuse, terrorism, and other fields. ICPSR advances and expands social and behavioral research, acting as a global leader in data stewardship and providing rich data resources and responsive educational opportunities for present and future generations.
The Health and Retirement Study (HRS) is a longitudinal panel study that surveys a representative sample of more than 26,000 Americans over the age of 50 every two years. The study has collected information about income, work, assets, pension plans, health insurance, disability, physical health and functioning, cognitive functioning, genetic information and health care expenditures.
The Fragile Families & Child Wellbeing Study is following a cohort of nearly 5,000 children born in large U.S. cities between 1998 and 2000 (roughly three-quarters of whom were born to unmarried parents). We refer to unmarried parents and their children as “fragile families” to underscore that they are families and that they are at greater risk of breaking up and living in poverty than more traditional families. The core Study was originally designed to primarily address four questions of great interest to researchers and policy makers: (1) What are the conditions and capabilities of unmarried parents, especially fathers?; (2) What is the nature of the relationships between unmarried parents?; (3) How do children born into these families fare?; and (4) How do policies and environmental conditions affect families and children?
The Integrated Fertility Survey Series (IFSS) is a project of the Population Studies aiming in view to produce a harmonized dataset of U.S. family and fertility surveys spanning five decades (1955-2002). IFSS integrates data from ten underlying component studies of family and fertility encompassing the Growth of American Families (GAF) in 1955 and 1960; National Fertility Surveys (NFS) in 1965 and 1970; as well as National Surveys of Family Growth (NSFG) in 1973, 1976, 1982, 1988, 1995, and 2002. The first release contains harmonized sociodemographic variables for all respondents from all ten component studies, including those related to marital status, race and ethnicity, etc. Thus it provides access to researchers, educators, students, policy makers, and others with a data resource to examine issues related to families and fertility in the United States. Potential users can download original/ harmonized datasets (along with documentation) and numerous analytic tools make it possible to quickly and easily explore the data and obtain information about changes in behaviors and attitudes across time.
The CDHA assists researchers to create, document, and distribute public use microdata on health and aging for secondary analysis. Major research themes include: midlife development and aging; economics of population aging; inequalities in health and aging; international comparative studies of health and aging; and the investigation of linkages between social-demographic and biomedical research in population aging. The CDHA is one of fourteen demography centers on aging sponsored by the National Institute on Aging.
!!!the repository is no longer available, Please use: TheDataWeb at http://www.thedataweb.org/!!! This dataverse contains holdings from The DataWeb . TheDataWeb is the network of online data libraries and the infrastructure for intelligent browsing and accessing data across the Internet using the DataFerrett as the interface. TheDataWeb brings together under one umbrella demographic, economic, environmental, health, (and more) datasets that are usually separated by geography and/or organizations.
The Comparative Agendas Project (CAP) assembles and codes information on the policy processes of governments from around the world. CAP enables scholars, students, policy-makers and the media to investigate trends in policy-making across time and between countries. It classifies policy activities into a single, universal and consistent coding scheme.
American FactFinder, maintained by the U.S. Census Bureau, is a source for United States population, housing, economic, and geographic data. The Census Bureau conducts nearly one hundred surveys and censuses every year. Note that by law, no one is permitted to reveal information from these censuses and surveys that could identify any person, household, or business.
The American National Election Studies (ANES) conducts national surveys and pilot studies and provides large, multifaceted datasets. Time Series Studies are conducted during years of national elections, with pre-election and post-election surveys conducted in presidential election years and post-election surveys conducted during congressional election years. Pilot Studies are normally conducted in years when there is no national election and are designed to test new, or to refine existing, instrumentation and study designs. Other Major Data Collections includes panel studies and other special studies.
BADGIR is an on-line data archive at the University of Wisconsin - Madison. From this portal you can browse or search data documentation (e.g., metadata, codebooks) and univariate summary statistics (e.g., mean, frequency counts). The database contains documented survey results from various survey-research projects in the US, Central America, and South America. Some historical datasets also (e.g. of slave-trade records).
The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) is the world's largest, on-going telephone health survey system. As a result, surveys were developed and conducted to monitor state-level prevalence of the major behavioral risks among adults associated with premature morbidity and mortality. The basic philosophy was to collect data on actual behaviors, rather than on attitudes or knowledge, that would be especially useful for planning, initiating, supporting, and evaluating health promotion and disease prevention programs. Currently data are collected monthly in all 50 states.
The gift of the Stowell Datasets, a digital archive of psychographic data, to the College of Liberal Arts (and continued gift of new datasets) provide a unique opportunity for WSU to facilitate access to a valuable research resource. The datasets include over 350 individual major media market surveys (CATI, Random Digit Dialing telephone surveys) collected over the period 1989-2001 and feature approximately n=1,000+ respondents for each market for each year.
NAHDAP acquires, preserves and disseminates data relevant to drug addiction and HIV research. By preserving and making available an easily accessible library of electronic data on drug addiction and HIV infection in the United States, NAHDAP offers scholars the opportunity to conduct secondary analysis on major issues of social and behavioral sciences and public policy
AmericasBarometer surveys are multi-country, regularly conducted surveys of democratic values and behaviors in the Americas. The raw data are available for free at all LAPOP consortium member institutions, and at all other users worldwide. Besides this a permanent ownership of the data, in becoming a 'repository', is possible for a fee.
The Mexican Health and Aging Study (MHAS) started as a prospective panel study of health and aging in Mexico. MHAS is nationally representative of the 13 million Mexicans born prior to 1951. The survey has national and urban/rural representation. The baseline survey, in 2001, included a nationally representative sample of Mexicans aged 50 and over and their spouse/partners regardless of their age. A direct interview was sought with each individual and proxy interviews were obtained when poor health or temporary absence precluded a direct interview. The sample was distributed in all 32 states of the country in urban and rural areas. Households in the six states which account for 40% of all migrants to the U.S. were over-sampled. A sub-sample was selected to obtain anthropometric measures.
The National Collaborative on Childhood Obesity Research (NCCOR) brings together four of the nation's leading research funders — the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) — to address the problem of childhood obesity in America. The Tools of the NCCOR are: Catalogue of Surveillance Systems, Measures Registry and Registry of Studies.
The Gateway to Global Aging Data is a platform for population survey data on aging around the world. This site offers a digital library of survey questions, a search engine for finding comparable questions across surveys, and identically defined variables for cross-country analysis. The Survey Meta Data Repository provides Health and Retirement Study metadata of family surveys. Survey Meta Data Repository primarily provides access to survey metadata so researchers can compare survey formats, types and identically defined variables. Additional resources include tools for cross-country analysis, general statistics by country and year, survey question library, and tools for comparing questions across the surveys. Datasets are in Stata format; users must register and request datasets.
The Minnesota Population Center (MPC) is a University-wide interdisciplinary cooperative for demographic research. The MPC serves more than 80 faculty members and research scientists from eight colleges and institutes at the University of Minnesota. As a leading developer and disseminator of demographic data, we also serve a broader audience of some 50,000 demographic researchers worldwide.