Filter
Reset all

Subjects

Content Types

Countries

AID systems

API

Certificates

Data access

Data access restrictions

Database access

Database access restrictions

Database licenses

Data licenses

Data upload

Data upload restrictions

Enhanced publication

Institution responsibility type

Institution type

Keywords

Metadata standards

PID systems

Provider types

Quality management

Repository languages

Software

Syndications

Repository types

Versioning

  • * at the end of a keyword allows wildcard searches
  • " quotes can be used for searching phrases
  • + represents an AND search (default)
  • | represents an OR search
  • - represents a NOT operation
  • ( and ) implies priority
  • ~N after a word specifies the desired edit distance (fuzziness)
  • ~N after a phrase specifies the desired slop amount
Found 83 result(s)
Stanford Network Analysis Platform (SNAP) is a general purpose network analysis and graph mining library. It is written in C++ and easily scales to massive networks with hundreds of millions of nodes, and billions of edges. It efficiently manipulates large graphs, calculates structural properties, generates regular and random graphs, and supports attributes on nodes and edges. SNAP is also available through the NodeXL which is a graphical front-end that integrates network analysis into Microsoft Office and Excel. The SNAP library is being actively developed since 2004 and is organically growing as a result of our research pursuits in analysis of large social and information networks. Largest network we analyzed so far using the library was the Microsoft Instant Messenger network from 2006 with 240 million nodes and 1.3 billion edges. The datasets available on the website were mostly collected (scraped) for the purposes of our research. The website was launched in July 2009.
MTSA is a Metropolitan Travel Survey Archive to store, preserve, and make publicly available, via the internet, travel surveys conducted by metropolitan areas, states and localities. As a result of cooperation from several agencies, we now have been able to post databases along with relevant documentation for many regions in the archive http://www.surveyarchive.org/archive.html . The databases and the documentation can be obtained from this website. In addition to making these databases publicly available, we are also in the process of converting all the databases to a common format to enhance the readability and usability of each survey, so many surveys can be used online, see analyze http://www.surveyarchive.org/analyze.html. The results from the first year of the project, along with issues related to archiving travel survey data are provided in our reports page http://www.surveyarchive.org/reports.html . Papers written by Yacov Zahavi, an instrumental figure in the development of travel surveys, are also provided here.
The centerpiece of the Global Trade Analysis Project is a global data base describing bilateral trade patterns, production, consumption and intermediate use of commodities and services. The GTAP Data Base consists of bilateral trade, transport, and protection matrices that link individual country/regional economic data bases. The regional data bases are derived from individual country input-output tables, from varying years.
The Wilson Center Digital Archive contains once-secret documents from governments all across the globe, uncovering new sources and providing fresh insights into the history of international relations and diplomacy. It contains newly declassified historical materials from archives around the world—much of it in translation and including diplomatic cables, high level correspondence, meeting minutes and more. It collects the research of three Wilson Center projects which focus on the interrelated histories of the Cold War, Korea, and Nuclear Proliferation.
GroupLens is a research lab in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities specializing in recommender systems, online communities, mobile and ubiquitous technologies, digital libraries, and local geographic information systems.
SSDA Dataverse is one of the archiving opportunities of SSDA, the others are: Data can be archived by SSDA itself (http://dataarchives.ss.ucla.edu/index.html) or by ICPSR or by UCLA Library or by California Digital Library. The Social Science Data Archives serves the UCLA campus as an archive of faculty and graduate student survey research. We provide long term storage of data files and documentation. We ensure that the data are useable in the future by migrating files to new operating systems. We follow government standards and archival best practices. The mission of the Social Science Data Archive has been and continues to be to provide a foundation for social science research with faculty support throughout an entire research project involving original data collection or the reuse of publicly available studies. Data Archive staff and researchers work as partners throughout all stages of the research process, beginning when a hypothesis or area of study is being developed, during grant and funding activities, while data collection and/or analysis is ongoing, and finally in long term preservation of research results. Our role is to provide a collaborative environment where the focus is on understanding the nature and scope of research approach and management of research output throughout the entire life cycle of the project. Instructional support, especially support that links research with instruction is also a mainstay of operations.
The Roper Center for Public Opinion Research is one of the world's leading archives of social science data, specializing in data from surveys of public opinion. The data held by the Roper Center range from the 1930s, when survey research was in its infancy, to the present. Most of the data are from the United States, but over 50 nations are represented.
a collection of data at Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) supporting research that helps people make more informed decisions and improves the quality of health care services. The portal contains U.S.Health Information Knowledgebase (USHIK) and Systematic Review Data Repository (SRDR) and other sources concerning cost, quality, accesibility and evaluation of healthcare and medical insurance.
The GHDx is our user-friendly and searchable data catalog for global health, demographic, and other health-related datasets. It provides detailed information about datasets ranging from censuses and surveys to health records and vital statistics, globally. It also serves as a platform for data owners to share their data with the public. The GDB Compare visualization, which allows the user to see rate of change in disease incidence, globally or by country, by age or across all ages, is especially powerful as a tool. Be sure to try adding a bottom chart, like the map, to augment the treemap that loads by default in the top chart.
The Health and Medical Care Archive (HMCA) is the data archive of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), the largest philanthropy devoted exclusively to health and health care in the United States. Operated by the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR) at the University of Michigan, HMCA preserves and disseminates data collected by selected research projects funded by the Foundation and facilitates secondary analyses of the data. Our goal is to increase understanding of health and health care in the United States through secondary analysis of RWJF-supported data collections
A national study on socioeconomics and family health over lifetimes and across generations funded by National Science Foundation (NSF). It is the longest running longitudinal household survey in the world, started in 1968 with a nationally representative sample of over 18,000 individuals living in 5,000 families in the United States. It is recognizing the importance of the socioeconomic data, available on this website without cost to researchers and analysts.
The National Science Digital Library provides high quality online educational resources for teaching and learning, with current emphasis on the sciences, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines—both formal and informal, institutional and individual, in local, state, national, and international educational settings. The NSDL collection contains structured descriptive information (metadata) about web-based educational resources held on other sites by their providers. These providers have contribute this metadata to NSDL for organized search and open access to educational resources via this website and its services.
The NCAA Student-Athlete Experiences Data Archive provides access to data about student athletes and will grow to include a handful of user-friendly data collections related to graduation rates; team-level Academic Progress Rates in Division I; and individual-level data on the experiences of current and former student-athletes from the NCAA's Growth, Opportunities, Aspirations and Learning of Students in college study (GOALS), and the Study of College Outcomes and Recent Experiences (SCORE). In the long run, the NCAA expects to follow this initial release with the publication of as much data as possible from its archives. The data is used by college presidents, athletic personnel, faculty, student-athlete groups, media members, and researchers in looking at issues related to intercollegiate athletics and higher education.
TeachingWithData.org is a portal where faculty can find resources and ideas to reduce the challenges of bringing real data into post-secondary classes. It allows faculty to introduce and build students' quantitative reasoning abilities with readily available, user-friendly, data-driven teaching materials.
The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics collects, analyzes, and publishes reliable information on many aspects of the United States economy and society. They measure employment, compensation, worker safety, productivity, and price movements. This information is used by jobseekers, workers, business leaders, and others to assist them in making sound decisions at work and at home. Statistical data covers a wide range of topics about the labor market, economy and society in the U.S.; subject areas include: Inflation & Prices, Employment, Unemployment, Pay & Benefits, Spending & Time Use, Productivity, Workplace Injuries, International, and Regional Resources. Data is available in multiple formats including charts and tables as well as Bureau of Labor Statistics publications.
Our lab investigates how cognition manifests in, and is influenced by, the social contexts in which it occurs. We focus: 1) on how conversational interactions can reshape memory, by promoting shared remembering and shared forgetting, and 2) on how socio-cognitive processes affect the formation of collective memories and beliefs, and the dynamics of collective decisions. In exploring these issues, while maintaining high ecological validity, our lab integrates a wide range of methodologies, including laboratory experiments, field studies, social network analysis, and agent-based simulations.
The Comparative Welfare Entitlements Dataset (CWED) contains information about the structure and generosity of social insurance benefits in 33 countries around the world. The data contained here are an updated and extended version of CWED 1, which has been available since 2004. This web site allows you to download customized portions of the CWED 2 data, browse the Working Paper Series or access documentary material.
The HSRC Research Data Service provides a digital repository facility for the HSRC's research data in support of evidence based human and social development in South Africa and the broader region. It includes both quantitative and qualitative data. Access to data is dependent on ethical requirements for protecting research participants, as well as on legal agreements with the owners, funders or in the case of data owned by the HSRC, the requirements of the depositors of the data.
The Roper Center has made available its entire collection of Primary exit polls. Primary exit polls datasets include standard demographic makeup of interviewee and questions pertinent to the issues of each state.
The Cross-National Equivalent File (CNEF) contains population panel data from Australia, Canada, Germany, Great Britain, Korea, Russia, Switzerland and the United States. Each of these countries undertakes a longitudinal household economic survey. The data are made equivalent, providing a reference dataset which cross-links each of the individual studies and allowing cross-national comparisons.
NACDA acquires and preserves data relevant to gerontological research, processing as needed to promote effective research use, disseminates them to researchers, and facilitates their use. By preserving and making available the largest library of electronic data on aging in the United States, NACDA offers opportunities for secondary analysis on major issues of scientific and policy relevance
The Henry A. Murray Research Archive is Harvard's endowed, permanent repository for quantitative and qualitative research data at the Institute for Quantitative Social Science, and provides physical storage for the entire IQSS Dataverse Network. Our collection comprises over 100 terabytes of data, audio, and video. We preserve in perpetuity all types of data of interest to the research community, including numerical, video, audio, interview notes, and other data. We accept data deposits through this web site, which is powered by our Dataverse Network software
The Human Mortality Database (HMD) was created to provide detailed mortality and population data to researchers, students, journalists, policy analysts, and others interested in the history of human longevity. The Human Mortality Database (HMD) contains original calculations of death rates and life tables for national populations (countries or areas), as well as the input data used in constructing those tables. The input data consist of death counts from vital statistics, plus census counts, birth counts, and population estimates from various sources.