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Found 45 result(s)
Content type(s)
The EVIA Digital Archive Project is a repository of ethnographic video recordings and an infrastructure of tools and systems supporting scholars in the ethnographic disciplines. The project focuses on the fields of ethnomusicology, folklore, anthropology, and dance ethnology.
GloPAD is a multimedia, multilingual, Web-accessible database containing digital images, texts, video clips, sound recordings, and complex media objects (such as 3-D images) related to the performing arts from around the world. GloPAD (Global Performing Arts Database) records include authoritative, detailed, multilingual descriptions of digital images, texts, video clips, sound recordings, and complex media objects related to the performing arts around the world, plus information about related pieces, productions, performers, and creators. GloPAC is an international organization of institutions and individuals committed to using innovative digital technologies to create easily accessible, multimedia, and multilingual information resources for the study and preservation of the performing arts.
The Buckeye Corpus of conversational speech contains high-quality recordings from 40 speakers in Columbus OH conversing freely with an interviewer. The speech has been orthographically transcribed and phonetically labeled. The audio and text files, together with time-aligned phonetic labels, are stored in a format for use with speech analysis software (Xwaves and Wavesurfer). Software for searching the transcription files is currently being written.
The Wilson Center Digital Archive contains once-secret documents from governments all across the globe, uncovering new sources and providing fresh insights into the history of international relations and diplomacy. It contains newly declassified historical materials from archives around the world—much of it in translation and including diplomatic cables, high level correspondence, meeting minutes and more. It collects the research of three Wilson Center projects which focus on the interrelated histories of the Cold War, Korea, and Nuclear Proliferation.
The National Science Digital Library provides high quality online educational resources for teaching and learning, with current emphasis on the sciences, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines—both formal and informal, institutional and individual, in local, state, national, and international educational settings. The NSDL collection contains structured descriptive information (metadata) about web-based educational resources held on other sites by their providers. These providers have contribute this metadata to NSDL for organized search and open access to educational resources via this website and its services.
The Digital Archaeological Record (tDAR) is an international digital repository for the digital records of archaeological investigations. tDAR’s use, development, and maintenance are governed by Digital Antiquity, an organization dedicated to ensuring the long-term preservation of irreplaceable archaeological data and to broadening the access to these data.
The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) is the nation's record keeper. Of all documents and materials created in the course of business conducted by the United States Federal government, only 1%-3% are so important for legal or historical reasons that they are kept by us forever. Those valuable records are preserved and are available to you, whether you want to see if they contain clues about your family’s history, need to prove a veteran’s military service, or are researching an historical topic that interests you.
OLAC, the Open Language Archives Community, is an international partnership of institutions and individuals who are creating a worldwide virtual library of language resources by: (i) developing consensus on best current practice for the digital archiving of language resources, and (ii) developing a network of interoperating repositories and services for housing and accessing such resources.
TeachingWithData.org is a portal where faculty can find resources and ideas to reduce the challenges of bringing real data into post-secondary classes. It allows faculty to introduce and build students' quantitative reasoning abilities with readily available, user-friendly, data-driven teaching materials.
CHILDES is the child language component of the TalkBank system. TalkBank is a system for sharing and studying conversational interactions.
The UC San Diego Library Digital Collections website gathers two categories of content managed by the Library: library collections (including digitized versions of selected collections covering topics such as art, film, music, history and anthropology) and research data collections (including research data generated by UC San Diego researchers).
The Digital Collections repository is a service that provides free and open access to the scholarship and creative works produced and owned by the Texas State University community. The Wittliff Collections, located on the seventh floor of the Albert B. Alkek Library at Texas State University, was founded by William D. Wittliff in 1987. The Wittliff Collections include 2 collections. 1. The Southwestern Writers Collection: These Collection holds the papers of numerous 20th century writers and the Southwestern & Mexican Photography Collection. The film holdings contain over 500 film and television screenplays as well as complete production archives for several popular films, including the television miniseries Lonesome Dove. The music holdings represent the breadth and scope of popular Texas sounds. 2. Mexican Photography Collection: The Southwestern & Mexican Photography Collection assembles a broad range of photographic work from the Southwestern United States and Mexico, from the 19th-century to the present day.
MINDS@UW is designed to gather, distribute, and preserve digital materials related to the University of Wisconsin's research and instructional mission. Content, which is deposited directly by UW faculty and staff, may include research papers and reports, pre-prints and post-prints, datasets and other primary research materials, learning objects, theses, student projects, conference papers and presentations, and other born-digital or digitized research and instructional materials.
D-PLACE contains cultural, linguistic, environmental and geographic information for over 1400 human ‘societies’. A ‘society’ in D-PLACE represents a group of people in a particular locality, who often share a language and cultural identity. All cultural descriptions are tagged with the date to which they refer and with the ethnographic sources that provided the descriptions. The majority of the cultural descriptions in D-PLACE are based on ethnographic work carried out in the 19th and early-20th centuries (pre-1950).
By stimulating inspiring research and producing innovative tools, Huygens ING intends to open up old and inaccessible sources, and to understand them better. Huygens ING’s focus is on Digital Humanities, History, History of Science, and Textual Scholarship. Huygens ING pursues research in the fields of History, Literary Studies, the History of Science and Digital Humanities. Huygens ING aims to publish digital sources and data responsibly and with care. Innovative tools are made as widely available as possible. We strive to share the available knowledge at the institute with both academic peers and the wider public.
The Polinsky Language Sciences Lab at Harvard University is a linguistics lab that examines questions of language structure and its effect on the ways in which people use and process language in real time. We engage in linguistic and interdisciplinary research projects ourselves; offer linguistic research capabilities for undergraduate and graduate students, faculty, and visitors; and build relationships with the linguistic communities in which we do our research. We are interested in a broad range of issues pertaining to syntax, interfaces, and cross-linguistic variation. We place a particular emphasis on novel experimental evidence that facilitates the construction of linguistic theory. We have a strong cross-linguistic focus, drawing upon English, Russian, Chinese, Korean, Mayan languages, Basque, Austronesian languages, languages of the Caucasus, and others. We believe that challenging existing theories with data from as broad a range of languages as possible is a crucial component of the successful development of linguistic theory. We investigate both fluent speakers and heritage speakers—those who grew up hearing or speaking a particular language but who are now more fluent in a different, societally dominant language. Heritage languages, a novel field of linguistic inquiry, are important because they provide new insights into processes of linguistic development and attrition in general, thus increasing our understanding of the human capacity to maintain and acquire language. Understanding language use and processing in real time and how children acquire language helps us improve language study and pedagogy, which in turn improves communication across the globe. Although our lab does not specialize in language acquisition, we have conducted some studies of acquisition of lesser-studied languages and heritage languages, with the purpose of comparing heritage speakers to adults.
Content type(s)
MICASE provides a collection of transcripts of academic speech events recorded at the University of Michigan. The original DAT audiotapes are held in the English Language Institute and may be consulted by bona fide researchers under special arrangements
The World Christian Database provides comprehensive statistical information on world religions, Christian denominations, and people groups. The World Christian Database transforms current religious statistics into a real-time analysis tool that takes just minutes to perform even detailed research. This comprehensive database brings together a fully updated and cohesive religious data set with a world-class database architecture. The result is a simple, yet powerful database tool that enables users to customize reports and download data for in use in charts, tables, and graphs
The English Lexicon Project (supported by the National Science Foundation) affords access to a large set of lexical characteristics, along with behavioral data from visual lexical decision and naming studies of 40,481 words and 40,481 nonwords.
>>>>> As of 01/12/2015, deposit of data on SLDR website will be suspended to allow the public opening of Ortolang platform https://www.ortolang.fr/#/market/home .<<<<<Speech & Language Data Repository (SLDR) is a Trusted Data Repository offering labs and scholars a free-of-charge service for sharing their oral/linguistic data and archiving it with the help of procedures compliant with the OAIS model for long-term preservation. Its entire storage is referenced in international repositories such as OLAC (Open Language Archives Community) and CLARIN Virtual Language Observatory (VLO). Currently, packages are distributed via the TGE-Adonis grid, now integrated in Huma-Num, hosted by CC-IN2P3 and preserved on the platform of CINES, an institutional archive beneficiary of the Data Seal of Approval.
You will find in the Access to Archival Databases (AAD) resource online access to records in a small selection of historic databases preserved permanently in NARA. Out of the nearly 200,000 data files in its holdings, NARA has selected approximately 475 of them for public searching through AAD. We selected these data because the records identify specific persons, geographic areas, organizations, and dates. The records cover a wide variety of civilian and military functions and have many genealogical, social, political, and economic research uses. AAD provides: Access to over 85 million historic electronic records created by more than 30 agencies of the U.S. federal government and from collections of donated historical materials. Both free-text and fielded searching options. The ability to retrieve, print, and download records with the specific information that you seek. Information to help you find and understand the records.
Open Context is a free, open access resource for the electronic publication of primary field research from archaeology and related disciplines. It emerged as a means for scholars and students to easily find and reuse content created by others, which are key to advancing research and education. Open Context's technologies focus on ease of use, open licensing frameworks, informal data integration and, most importantly, data portability.Open Context currently publishes 23 projects.
The BERMAN JEWISH DATABANK @ THE JEWISH FEDERATIONS OF NORTH AMERICA is the central online address for quantitative studies of North American Jews and Jewish communities. Archives and makes available electronically questionnaires, reports and data files from the National Jewish Population Surveys (NJPS) of 1971, 1990 and 2000-01. It provides access to other national Jewish population reports, Jewish population statistics and approximately 200 local Jewish community studies from the major Jewish communities in North America.
The Comparative Agendas Project (CAP) assembles and codes information on the policy processes of governments from around the world. CAP enables scholars, students, policy-makers and the media to investigate trends in policy-making across time and between countries. It classifies policy activities into a single, universal and consistent coding scheme.