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Found 28 result(s)
The Archaeology Data Service supports research, learning and teaching with freely available, high quality and dependable digital resources. It does this by preserving digital data in the long term, and by promoting and disseminating a broad range of data in archaeology. The ADS promotes good practice in the use of digital data in archaeology, it provides technical advice to the research community, and supports the deployment of digital technologies.
The UK Data Service is a comprehensive resource funded by the ESRC to support researchers, teachers and policymakers who depend on high-quality social and economic data. Here you will find a single point of access to a wide range of secondary data including large-scale government surveys, international macrodata, business microdata, qualitative studies and census data.
VADS is the online resource for visual arts. It has provided services to the academic community for 12 years and has built up a considerable portfolio of visual art collections comprising over 100,000 images that are freely available and copyright cleared for use in learning, teaching and research in the UK. VADS provides: expert guidance and help for digital projects in art education; resource development and hosting for art education; project management and consultancy for art education; leadership in the innovative use of ICT in education through its research and development activities. VADS offers advice and guidance to the visual arts research, teaching and learning communities on all aspects of digital resource management from funding, through delivery and use, to preservation.
Codex Sinaiticus is one of the most important books in the world. Handwritten well over 1600 years ago, the manuscript contains the Christian Bible in Greek, including the oldest complete copy of the New Testament. The Codex Sinaiticus Project is an international collaboration to reunite the entire manuscript in digital form and make it accessible to a global audience for the first time. Drawing on the expertise of leading scholars, conservators and curators, the Project gives everyone the opportunity to connect directly with this famous manuscript.
The Old Bailey Proceedings Online makes available a fully searchable, digitised collection of all surviving editions of the Old Bailey Proceedings from 1674 to 1913, and of the Ordinary of Newgate's Accounts between 1676 and 1772. It allows access to over 197,000 trials and biographical details of approximately 2,500 men and women executed at Tyburn, free of charge for non-commercial use. In addition to the text, accessible through both keyword and structured searching, this website provides digital images of all 190,000 original pages of the Proceedings, 4,000 pages of Ordinary's Accounts, advice on methods of searching this resource, information on the historical and legal background to the Old Bailey court and its Proceedings, and descriptions of published and manuscript materials relating to the trials covered. Contemporary maps, and images have also been provided.
The Digital Archaeological Record (tDAR) is an international digital repository for the digital records of archaeological investigations. tDAR’s use, development, and maintenance are governed by Digital Antiquity, an organization dedicated to ensuring the long-term preservation of irreplaceable archaeological data and to broadening the access to these data.
The Detection of Archaeological Residues using Remote-sensing Techniques (DART) project was initiated in 2010 in order to investigate the ability of various sensors to detect archaeological features in ‘difficult’ circumstances. Concluding in September 2013, DART had the overall aim of developing analytical methods for identifying and quantifying gradual changes and dynamics in sensor responses associated with surface and near-surface archaeological features under different environmental and land-management conditions.
Science Photo Library (SPL) provides creative professionals with striking specialist imagery, unrivalled in quality, accuracy and depth of information. We have more than 600,000 images and 40,000 clips to choose from, with hundreds of new submissions uploaded to the website each week.
The figshare service for The Open University was launched in 2016 and allows researchers to store, share and publish research data. It helps the research data to be accessible by storing metadata alongside datasets. Additionally, every uploaded item receives a Digital Object Identifier (DOI), which allows the data to be citable and sustainable. If there are any ethical or copyright concerns about publishing a certain dataset, it is possible to publish the metadata associated with the dataset to help discoverability while sharing the data itself via a private channel through manual approval.
The History Data Service data collection brings together over 650 separate studies transcribed, scanned or compiled from historical sources. The studies cover a wide range of historical topics, from the seventh century to the twentieth century. Although the primary focus of the collection is on the United Kingdom, it also includes a significant body of cross-national and international data collections. Examples of topics covered include: nineteenth and twentieth century statistics, manuscript census records, state finance data, demographic data, mortality data, community histories, electoral history and economic indicators.
The HMAP Data Pages are a research resource comprising of information derived largely from historical records relating to fishing catches and effort in selected spatial and temporal contexts. The History of Marine Animal Populations (HMAP), the historical component of the Census of Marine Life, aimed to improve our understanding of ecosystem dynamics, specifically with regard to long-term changes in stock abundance, the ecological impact of large-scale harvesting by man, and the role of marine resources in the historical development of human society. HMAP data is also accessible through the Ocean Biogeographic Information System (OBIS): http://www.iobis.org/, see also: http://seamap.env.duke.edu/dataset
The National Digital Archive of Datasets (NDAD) provides access to archived datasets and documents from United Kingdom government departments which can be searched or browsed by subjects such as armed forces service or wills and death duties. Statistics and information gathered through census data as well as public records are used to compile the available datasets. All datasets are available to download and contain a record summary as well as custodial history, background on the source of the data and whether or not data may be added to the dataset in the future.
Content type(s)
RED is a collection of databases whose aim is to accumulate as much evidence as possible about reading experiences across the world. The search and browse facilities enable you to chart the reading tastes of individual readers as they travel to other countries, and consider how different environments may have affected their reading. You can track the readership of books issued in new editions for new audiences in different countries. Search results are displayed on an interactive map and linked to relevant records in national REDs. Each national RED offers a range of services to users, including profiles of readers, authors, and titles; tutorials on accessing and analysing evidence; and examples of how scholars have used the database to uncover patterns of reading.
Content type(s)
Wellcome Images is one of the Wellcome Library's major visual collections and also forms part of Wellcome Collection. Wellcome Images is one of the world's richest and most unique collections, with themes ranging from medical and social history to contemporary healthcare and biomedical science. This unrivalled collection contains historical images from the Wellcome Library collections, Tibetan Buddhist paintings, ancient Sanskrit manuscripts written on palm leaves, beautifully illuminated Persian books and much more.
Apollo (previously DSpace@Cambridge) is the University of Cambridge’s institutional repository, preserving and providing access to content created by members of the University. The repository stores a range of content and provides different levels of access, but its primary focus is on providing open access to the University’s research publications.
This Repository holds research data for all research projects where there is a need to store and share the supporting research. According to current Research Data Policy these records will include all data from projects funded by RCUK funders and in particular the AHRC.
The UCD Digital Library is a platform for exploring cultural heritage, engaging with digital scholarship, and accessing research data. The UCD Digital Library allows you to search, browse and explore a growing collection of historical materials, photographs, art, interviews, letters, and other exciting content, that have been digitised and made freely available.
The DCS allows you to search a catalogue of metadata (information describing data) to discover and gain access to NERC's data holdings and information products. The metadata are prepared to a common NERC Metadata Standard and are provided to the catalogue by the NERC Data Centres.
The Manchester Romani Project is part of an international network of scholarly projects devoted to research on Romani language and linguistics, coordinated in partnership with Dieter Halwachs (Institute of Linguistics, Graz University and Romani-Projekt Graz), and Peter Bakker (Institute of Linguistics, Aarhus University). The project explores the linguistic features of the dialects of the Romani language, and their distribution in geographical space. An interactive web application is being designed, which will allow users to search and locate on a map different dialectal variants, and to explore how variants cluster in particular regions. Examples sentences and words with sound files will also be made available, to give impressions of dialectal variation within Romani. From the distribution of linguistic forms among the dialects it will be possible to make infeences about social-historical contacts among the Romani communities, and about migration patterns.
The University of Oxford Text Archive develops, collects, catalogues and preserves electronic literary and linguistic resources for use in Higher Education, in research, teaching and learning. We also give advice on the creation and use of these resources, and are involved in the development of standards and infrastructure for electronic language resources.
The aim of the project was to compile a representative computerized corpus of German for the period 1650-1800. This is the first such corpus of early modern German and it is intended as a primary research resource in a number of disciplines. Its structure deliberately parallels that of extant historical corpora of English in order to facilitate systematic comparative studies. The regional dimension which was an essential feature of the projects also provides information about the link between language and changes in the relative cultural and political areas within Germany.
York Digital Library (YODL) is a University-wide Digital Library service for multimedia resources used in or created through teaching, research and study at the University of York. YODL complements the University's research publications, held in White Rose Research Online and PURE, and the digital teaching materials in the University's Yorkshare Virtual Learning Environment. YODL contains a range of collections, including images, past exam papers, masters dissertations and audio. Some of these are available only to members of the University of York, whilst other material is available to the public. YODL is expanding with more content being added all the time