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Found 11 result(s)
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The Archive for Spoken German (AGD) collects and archives data of spoken German in interactions (conversation corpora) and data of domestic and non-domestic varieties of German (variation corpora). Currently, the AGD hosts around 50 corpora comprising more than 15000 audio and 500 video recordings amounting to around 5000 hours of recorded material with more than 7000 transcripts. With the Research and Teaching Corpus of Spoken German (FOLK) the AGD is also compiling an extensive German conversation corpus of its own. The archive curates data and makes them available to researchers. Curation comprises digitization, structuring and consistent documentation of audio and video recordings, transcripts, metadata and additional material. The scientific public can access the data via the Database for Spoken German (DGD2) or via a personal archive service. The AGD also advises researchers in using the existing inventory as well as in creating their own oral corpora.
By stimulating inspiring research and producing innovative tools, Huygens ING intends to open up old and inaccessible sources, and to understand them better. Huygens ING’s focus is on Digital Humanities, History, History of Science, and Textual Scholarship. Huygens ING pursues research in the fields of History, Literary Studies, the History of Science and Digital Humanities. Huygens ING aims to publish digital sources and data responsibly and with care. Innovative tools are made as widely available as possible. We strive to share the available knowledge at the institute with both academic peers and the wider public.
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MICASE provides a collection of transcripts of academic speech events recorded at the University of Michigan. The original DAT audiotapes are held in the English Language Institute and may be consulted by bona fide researchers under special arrangements
The English Lexicon Project (supported by the National Science Foundation) affords access to a large set of lexical characteristics, along with behavioral data from visual lexical decision and naming studies of 40,481 words and 40,481 nonwords.
Content type(s)
RED is a collection of databases whose aim is to accumulate as much evidence as possible about reading experiences across the world. The search and browse facilities enable you to chart the reading tastes of individual readers as they travel to other countries, and consider how different environments may have affected their reading. You can track the readership of books issued in new editions for new audiences in different countries. Search results are displayed on an interactive map and linked to relevant records in national REDs. Each national RED offers a range of services to users, including profiles of readers, authors, and titles; tutorials on accessing and analysing evidence; and examples of how scholars have used the database to uncover patterns of reading.
The Linguistic Data Consortium (LDC) is an open consortium of universities, libraries, corporations and government research laboratories. It was formed in 1992 to address the critical data shortage then facing language technology research and development. Initially, LDC's primary role was as a repository and distribution point for language resources. Since that time, and with the help of its members, LDC has grown into an organization that creates and distributes a wide array of language resources. LDC also supports sponsored research programs and language-based technology evaluations by providing resources and contributing organizational expertise. LDC is hosted by the University of Pennsylvania and is a center within the University’s School of Arts and Sciences.
The Alaska Native Language Archive houses documentation of the various Native languages of Alaska and helps to preserve and cultivate this unique heritage for future generations. As the premier repository worldwide for information relating to the Native languages of Alaska, the Archive serves researchers, teachers and students, as well as members of the broader community. The collection includes both published and unpublished materials in or on all of the Alaska Native languages and related languages. The collection has enduring cultural, historic, and intellectual value, particularly for Alaska Native language speakers and their descendants
Språkbanken is a collection of Norwegian language technology resources, and a national infrastructure for language technology and research. Our mandate is to collect and develop language resources, and to make these available for researchers, students and the ICT industry which works with the development of language-based ICT solutions. Språkbanken was established as a language policy initiative, designed to ensure that language technology solutions based on the Norwegian language will be developed, and thereby prevent domain loss of Norwegian in technology-dependent areas, cf. Mål og meining (Report 35, 2007 – 2008). As of today the collection contains resources in both Norwegian Bokmål and Nynorsk, as well as in Swedish, Danish and Norwegian Sign Language (NTS).
The University of Oxford Text Archive develops, collects, catalogues and preserves electronic literary and linguistic resources for use in Higher Education, in research, teaching and learning. We also give advice on the creation and use of these resources, and are involved in the development of standards and infrastructure for electronic language resources.
Welcome to the UCLA Phonetics Lab Archive. For over half a century, the UCLA Phonetics Laboratory has collected recordings of hundreds of languages from around the world, providing source materials for phonetic and phonological research, of value to scholars, speakers of the languages, and language learners alike. The materials on this site comprise audio recordings illustrating phonetic structures from over 200 languages with phonetic transcriptions, plus scans of original field notes where relevant.
ILC-CNR for CLARIN-IT repository is a library for linguistic data and tools. Including: Text Processing and Computational Philology; Natural Language Processing and Knowledge Extraction; Resources, Standards and Infrastructures; Computational Models of Language Usage. The studies carried out within each area are highly interdisciplinary and involve different professional skills and expertises that extend across the disciplines of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics, Computer Science and Bio-Engineering.