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Found 21 result(s)
The Buckeye Corpus of conversational speech contains high-quality recordings from 40 speakers in Columbus OH conversing freely with an interviewer. The speech has been orthographically transcribed and phonetically labeled. The audio and text files, together with time-aligned phonetic labels, are stored in a format for use with speech analysis software (Xwaves and Wavesurfer). Software for searching the transcription files is currently being written.
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The Universitat de Barcelona Digital Repository is an institutional resource containing open-access digital versions of publications related to the teaching, research and institutional activities of the UB's teaching staff and other members of the university community, including research data.
Currently, the IMS repository focuses on resources provided by the Institute for Natural Language Processing in Stuttgart (IMS) and other CLARIN-D related institutions such as the local Collaborative Research Centre 732 (SFB 732) as well as institutions and/or organizations that belong to the CLARIN-D extended scientific community. Comprehensive guidelines and workflows for submission by external contributors are being compiled based on the experiences in archiving such in-house resources.
OLAC, the Open Language Archives Community, is an international partnership of institutions and individuals who are creating a worldwide virtual library of language resources by: (i) developing consensus on best current practice for the digital archiving of language resources, and (ii) developing a network of interoperating repositories and services for housing and accessing such resources.
LAUDATIO aims to build an open access research data repository for historical linguistic data with respect to the above mentioned requirements of historical corpus linguistics. For the access and (re-)use of historical linguistic data the LAUDATIO repository uses a flexible and appropriate documentation schema with a subset of TEI customized by TEI ODD. The extensive metadata schema contains information about the preparation and checking methods applied to the data, tools, formats and annotation guidelines used in the project, as well as bibliographic metadata, and information on the research context (e.g. the research project). To provide complex and comprehensive search in the linguistic annotation data, the linguistic search and visualization tool ANNIS will be integrated in the LAUDATIO repository infrastructure.
The Polinsky Language Sciences Lab at Harvard University is a linguistics lab that examines questions of language structure and its effect on the ways in which people use and process language in real time. We engage in linguistic and interdisciplinary research projects ourselves; offer linguistic research capabilities for undergraduate and graduate students, faculty, and visitors; and build relationships with the linguistic communities in which we do our research. We are interested in a broad range of issues pertaining to syntax, interfaces, and cross-linguistic variation. We place a particular emphasis on novel experimental evidence that facilitates the construction of linguistic theory. We have a strong cross-linguistic focus, drawing upon English, Russian, Chinese, Korean, Mayan languages, Basque, Austronesian languages, languages of the Caucasus, and others. We believe that challenging existing theories with data from as broad a range of languages as possible is a crucial component of the successful development of linguistic theory. We investigate both fluent speakers and heritage speakers—those who grew up hearing or speaking a particular language but who are now more fluent in a different, societally dominant language. Heritage languages, a novel field of linguistic inquiry, are important because they provide new insights into processes of linguistic development and attrition in general, thus increasing our understanding of the human capacity to maintain and acquire language. Understanding language use and processing in real time and how children acquire language helps us improve language study and pedagogy, which in turn improves communication across the globe. Although our lab does not specialize in language acquisition, we have conducted some studies of acquisition of lesser-studied languages and heritage languages, with the purpose of comparing heritage speakers to adults.
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MICASE provides a collection of transcripts of academic speech events recorded at the University of Michigan. The original DAT audiotapes are held in the English Language Institute and may be consulted by bona fide researchers under special arrangements
The figshare service for The Open University was launched in 2016 and allows researchers to store, share and publish research data. It helps the research data to be accessible by storing metadata alongside datasets. Additionally, every uploaded item receives a Digital Object Identifier (DOI), which allows the data to be citable and sustainable. If there are any ethical or copyright concerns about publishing a certain dataset, it is possible to publish the metadata associated with the dataset to help discoverability while sharing the data itself via a private channel through manual approval.
>>>>> As of 01/12/2015, deposit of data on SLDR website will be suspended to allow the public opening of Ortolang platform https://www.ortolang.fr/#/market/home .<<<<<Speech & Language Data Repository (SLDR) is a Trusted Data Repository offering labs and scholars a free-of-charge service for sharing their oral/linguistic data and archiving it with the help of procedures compliant with the OAIS model for long-term preservation. Its entire storage is referenced in international repositories such as OLAC (Open Language Archives Community) and CLARIN Virtual Language Observatory (VLO). Currently, packages are distributed via the TGE-Adonis grid, now integrated in Huma-Num, hosted by CC-IN2P3 and preserved on the platform of CINES, an institutional archive beneficiary of the Data Seal of Approval.
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Based on Bowerman & Pederson’s Topological Relations Picture Series (TRPS), the author has researched the semantic space of static spatial prepositions of Hieroglyphic Ancient Egyptian (Egyptian, Afro-Asiatic), Arabic, English, French, German, Hebrew, Italian, Russian, and Spanish. This repository publication publishes the raw data.
Additionally to the institutional repository, current St. Edward's faculty have the option of uploading their work directly to their own SEU accounts on stedwards.figshare.com. Projects created on Figshare will automatically be published on this website as well. For more information, please see documentation
The repository of the Hamburg Centre for Speech Corpora is used for archiving, maintenance, distribution and development of spoken language corpora. These usually consist of audio and / or video recordings, transcriptions and other data and structured metadata. The corpora treat the focus on multilingualism and are generally freely available for research and teaching. Most of the measures maintained by the HZSK corpora were created in the years 2000-2011 in the framework of the SFB 538 "Multilingualism" at the University of Hamburg. The HZSK however also strives to take linguistic data from other projects or contexts, and to provide also the scientific community for research and teaching are available, provided that they are compatible with the current focus of HZSK, ie especially spoken language and multilingualism.
The University of Oxford Text Archive develops, collects, catalogues and preserves electronic literary and linguistic resources for use in Higher Education, in research, teaching and learning. We also give advice on the creation and use of these resources, and are involved in the development of standards and infrastructure for electronic language resources.
The goal of the Center of Estonian Language Resources (CELR) is to create and manage an infrastructure to make the Estonian language digital resources (dictionaries, corpora – both text and speech –, various language databases) and language technology tools (software) available to everyone working with digital language materials. CELR coordinates and organises the documentation and archiving of the resources as well as develops language technology standards and draws up necessary legal contracts and licences for different types of users (public, academic, commercial, etc.). In addition to collecting language resources, a system will be launched for introducing the resources to, informing and educating the potential users. The main users of CELR are researchers from Estonian R&D institutions and Social Sciences and Humanities researchers all over the world via the CLARIN ERIC network of similar centers in Europe. Access to data is provided through different sites: Public Repository https://entu.keeleressursid.ee/public-document , Language resources https://keeleressursid.ee/en/resources/corpora, and MetaShare CELR https://metashare.ut.ee/
The CLARIN­-D repository at the University of Leipzig offers long­term preservation of digital resources, along with their descriptive metadata. The mission of the repository is to ensure the availability and long­term preservation of resources, to preserve knowledge gained in research, to aid the transfer of knowledge into new contexts, and to integrate new methods and resources into university curricula. Among the resources currently available in the Leipzig repository are a set of corpora of the Leipzig Corpora Collection (LCC), based on newspaper, Wikipedia and Web text. Furthermore several REST-based webservices are provided for a variety of different NLP-relevant tasks
The repository is part of the eScience infrastructure of the University of Tübingen, which is a core facility that strongly cooperates with the library and computing center of the university. Integration of the repository into the national CLARIN-D and international CLARIN infrastructures gives it wide exposure, increasing the likelihood that the resources will be used and further developed beyond the lifetime of the projects in which they were developed. Among the resources currently available in the Tübingen Center Repository, researchers can find widely used treebanks of German (e.g. TüBa-D/Z), the German wordnet (GermaNet), the first manually annotated digital treebank (Index Thomisticus), as well as descriptions of the tools used by the WebLicht ecosystem for natural language processing.