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Found 17 result(s)
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The Archive for Spoken German (AGD) collects and archives data of spoken German in interactions (conversation corpora) and data of domestic and non-domestic varieties of German (variation corpora). Currently, the AGD hosts around 50 corpora comprising more than 15000 audio and 500 video recordings amounting to around 5000 hours of recorded material with more than 7000 transcripts. With the Research and Teaching Corpus of Spoken German (FOLK) the AGD is also compiling an extensive German conversation corpus of its own. The archive curates data and makes them available to researchers. Curation comprises digitization, structuring and consistent documentation of audio and video recordings, transcripts, metadata and additional material. The scientific public can access the data via the Database for Spoken German (DGD2) or via a personal archive service. The AGD also advises researchers in using the existing inventory as well as in creating their own oral corpora.
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PARADISEC (the Pacific And Regional Archive for Digital Sources in Endangered Cultures) offers a facility for digital conservation and access to endangered materials from all over the world. Our research group has developed models to ensure that the archive can provide access to interested communities, and conforms with emerging international standards for digital archiving. We have established a framework for accessioning, cataloguing and digitising audio, text and visual material, and preserving digital copies. The primary focus of this initial stage is safe preservation of material that would otherwise be lost, especially field tapes from the 1950s and 1960s.
META-SHARE, the open language resource exchange facility, is devoted to the sustainable sharing and dissemination of language resources (LRs) and aims at increasing access to such resources in a global scale. META-SHARE is an open, integrated, secure and interoperable sharing and exchange facility for LRs (datasets and tools) for the Human Language Technologies domain and other applicative domains where language plays a critical role. META-SHARE is implemented in the framework of the META-NET Network of Excellence. It is designed as a network of distributed repositories of LRs, including language data and basic language processing tools (e.g., morphological analysers, PoS taggers, speech recognisers, etc.). Data and tools can be both open and with restricted access rights, free and for-a-fee.
CHILDES is the child language component of the TalkBank system. TalkBank is a system for sharing and studying conversational interactions.
D-PLACE contains cultural, linguistic, environmental and geographic information for over 1400 human ‘societies’. A ‘society’ in D-PLACE represents a group of people in a particular locality, who often share a language and cultural identity. All cultural descriptions are tagged with the date to which they refer and with the ethnographic sources that provided the descriptions. The majority of the cultural descriptions in D-PLACE are based on ethnographic work carried out in the 19th and early-20th centuries (pre-1950).
The figshare service for The Open University was launched in 2016 and allows researchers to store, share and publish research data. It helps the research data to be accessible by storing metadata alongside datasets. Additionally, every uploaded item receives a Digital Object Identifier (DOI), which allows the data to be citable and sustainable. If there are any ethical or copyright concerns about publishing a certain dataset, it is possible to publish the metadata associated with the dataset to help discoverability while sharing the data itself via a private channel through manual approval.
Cocoon "COllections de COrpus Oraux Numériques" is a technical platform that accompanies the oral resource producers, create, organize and archive their corpus; a corpus can consist of records (usually audio) possibly accompanied by annotations of these records. The resources registered are first cataloged and stored while, and then, secondly archived in the archive of the TGIR Huma-Num. The author and his institution are responsible for filings and may benefit from a restricted and secure access to their data for a defined period, if the content of the information is considered sensitive. The COCOON platform is jointly operated by two joint research units: Laboratoire de Langues et civilisations à tradition orale (LACITO - UMR7107 - Université Paris3 / INALCO / CNRS) and Laboratoire Ligérien de Linguistique (LLL - UMR7270 - Universités d'Orléans et de Tours, BnF, CNRS).
The Linguistic Data Consortium (LDC) is an open consortium of universities, libraries, corporations and government research laboratories. It was formed in 1992 to address the critical data shortage then facing language technology research and development. Initially, LDC's primary role was as a repository and distribution point for language resources. Since that time, and with the help of its members, LDC has grown into an organization that creates and distributes a wide array of language resources. LDC also supports sponsored research programs and language-based technology evaluations by providing resources and contributing organizational expertise. LDC is hosted by the University of Pennsylvania and is a center within the University’s School of Arts and Sciences.
Additionally to the institutional repository, current St. Edward's faculty have the option of uploading their work directly to their own SEU accounts on stedwards.figshare.com. Projects created on Figshare will automatically be published on this website as well. For more information, please see documentation
Answering an increasing demand for digital and collective research features in the humanities, TextGrid has, since its start in 2006, established the infrastructure for a respective virtual research environment. In continuous exchange with the scientific community, TextGrid has developed a variety of tools and services available for free download in a stable version. Together with the TextGrid Repository, the Virtual Research environment TextGrid offers humanist researcher in the humanities sustainable editing, storing and publishing of their data in a thoroughly tested and safe environment. The vision of a digital ecosystem is based on the open source idea, allowing for free exchange of tools and data, whereby adaptation concerning discipline-specific needs is made possible. Researchers from a wide range of humanistic disciplines such as philology, linguistics, musicology, art history, classical philology and musicology are actively working with TextGrid have joined the TextGrid consortium in the second phase of the project.
The Bavarian Archive for Speech Signals (BAS) is a public institution hosted by the University of Munich. This institution was founded with the aim of making corpora of current spoken German available to both the basic research and the speech technology communities via a maximally comprehensive digital speech-signal database. The speech material will be structured in a manner allowing flexible and precise access, with acoustic-phonetic and linguistic-phonetic evaluation forming an integral part of it.
The Manchester Romani Project is part of an international network of scholarly projects devoted to research on Romani language and linguistics, coordinated in partnership with Dieter Halwachs (Institute of Linguistics, Graz University and Romani-Projekt Graz), and Peter Bakker (Institute of Linguistics, Aarhus University). The project explores the linguistic features of the dialects of the Romani language, and their distribution in geographical space. An interactive web application is being designed, which will allow users to search and locate on a map different dialectal variants, and to explore how variants cluster in particular regions. Examples sentences and words with sound files will also be made available, to give impressions of dialectal variation within Romani. From the distribution of linguistic forms among the dialects it will be possible to make infeences about social-historical contacts among the Romani communities, and about migration patterns.
eLaborate is an online work environment in which scholars can upload scans, transcribe and annotate text, and publish the results as on online text edition which is freely available to all users. Short information about and a link to already published editions is presented on the page Editions under Published. Information about editions currently being prepared is posted on the page Ongoing projects. The eLaborate work environment for the creation and publication of online digital editions is developed by the Huygens Institute for the History of the Netherlands of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences. Although the institute considers itself primarily a research facility and does not maintain a public collection profile, Huygens ING actively maintains almost 200 digitally available resource collections.
The aim of the project was to compile a representative computerized corpus of German for the period 1650-1800. This is the first such corpus of early modern German and it is intended as a primary research resource in a number of disciplines. Its structure deliberately parallels that of extant historical corpora of English in order to facilitate systematic comparative studies. The regional dimension which was an essential feature of the projects also provides information about the link between language and changes in the relative cultural and political areas within Germany.