Filter
Reset all

Subjects

Content Types

Countries

AID systems

API

Certificates

Data access

Data access restrictions

Database access

Database licenses

Data licenses

Data upload

Data upload restrictions

Enhanced publication

Institution responsibility type

Institution type

Keywords

Metadata standards

PID systems

Provider types

Quality management

Repository languages

Software

Syndications

Repository types

Versioning

  • * at the end of a keyword allows wildcard searches
  • " quotes can be used for searching phrases
  • + represents an AND search (default)
  • | represents an OR search
  • - represents a NOT operation
  • ( and ) implies priority
  • ~N after a word specifies the desired edit distance (fuzziness)
  • ~N after a phrase specifies the desired slop amount
  • 1 (current)
Found 23 result(s)
Country
The World Atlas of Language Structures (WALS) is a large database of structural (phonological, grammatical, lexical) properties of languages gathered from descriptive materials (such as reference grammars) by a team of 55 authors (many of them the leading authorities on the subject).
Currently, the IMS repository focuses on resources provided by the Institute for Natural Language Processing in Stuttgart (IMS) and other CLARIN-D related institutions such as the local Collaborative Research Centre 732 (SFB 732) as well as institutions and/or organizations that belong to the CLARIN-D extended scientific community. Comprehensive guidelines and workflows for submission by external contributors are being compiled based on the experiences in archiving such in-house resources.
META-SHARE, the open language resource exchange facility, is devoted to the sustainable sharing and dissemination of language resources (LRs) and aims at increasing access to such resources in a global scale. META-SHARE is an open, integrated, secure and interoperable sharing and exchange facility for LRs (datasets and tools) for the Human Language Technologies domain and other applicative domains where language plays a critical role. META-SHARE is implemented in the framework of the META-NET Network of Excellence. It is designed as a network of distributed repositories of LRs, including language data and basic language processing tools (e.g., morphological analysers, PoS taggers, speech recognisers, etc.). Data and tools can be both open and with restricted access rights, free and for-a-fee.
CHILDES is the child language component of the TalkBank system. TalkBank is a system for sharing and studying conversational interactions.
By stimulating inspiring research and producing innovative tools, Huygens ING intends to open up old and inaccessible sources, and to understand them better. Huygens ING’s focus is on Digital Humanities, History, History of Science, and Textual Scholarship. Huygens ING pursues research in the fields of History, Literary Studies, the History of Science and Digital Humanities. Huygens ING aims to publish digital sources and data responsibly and with care. Innovative tools are made as widely available as possible. We strive to share the available knowledge at the institute with both academic peers and the wider public.
The Polinsky Language Sciences Lab at Harvard University is a linguistics lab that examines questions of language structure and its effect on the ways in which people use and process language in real time. We engage in linguistic and interdisciplinary research projects ourselves; offer linguistic research capabilities for undergraduate and graduate students, faculty, and visitors; and build relationships with the linguistic communities in which we do our research. We are interested in a broad range of issues pertaining to syntax, interfaces, and cross-linguistic variation. We place a particular emphasis on novel experimental evidence that facilitates the construction of linguistic theory. We have a strong cross-linguistic focus, drawing upon English, Russian, Chinese, Korean, Mayan languages, Basque, Austronesian languages, languages of the Caucasus, and others. We believe that challenging existing theories with data from as broad a range of languages as possible is a crucial component of the successful development of linguistic theory. We investigate both fluent speakers and heritage speakers—those who grew up hearing or speaking a particular language but who are now more fluent in a different, societally dominant language. Heritage languages, a novel field of linguistic inquiry, are important because they provide new insights into processes of linguistic development and attrition in general, thus increasing our understanding of the human capacity to maintain and acquire language. Understanding language use and processing in real time and how children acquire language helps us improve language study and pedagogy, which in turn improves communication across the globe. Although our lab does not specialize in language acquisition, we have conducted some studies of acquisition of lesser-studied languages and heritage languages, with the purpose of comparing heritage speakers to adults.
The figshare service for The Open University was launched in 2016 and allows researchers to store, share and publish research data. It helps the research data to be accessible by storing metadata alongside datasets. Additionally, every uploaded item receives a Digital Object Identifier (DOI), which allows the data to be citable and sustainable. If there are any ethical or copyright concerns about publishing a certain dataset, it is possible to publish the metadata associated with the dataset to help discoverability while sharing the data itself via a private channel through manual approval.
>>>>> As of 01/12/2015, deposit of data on SLDR website will be suspended to allow the public opening of Ortolang platform https://www.ortolang.fr/#/market/home .<<<<<Speech & Language Data Repository (SLDR) is a Trusted Data Repository offering labs and scholars a free-of-charge service for sharing their oral/linguistic data and archiving it with the help of procedures compliant with the OAIS model for long-term preservation. Its entire storage is referenced in international repositories such as OLAC (Open Language Archives Community) and CLARIN Virtual Language Observatory (VLO). Currently, packages are distributed via the TGE-Adonis grid, now integrated in Huma-Num, hosted by CC-IN2P3 and preserved on the platform of CINES, an institutional archive beneficiary of the Data Seal of Approval.
The focus of CLARIN INL Portal is on resources that are relevant to the lexicological study of the Dutch language and on resources relevant for research in and development of language and speech technology. For Example: lexicons, lexical databases, text corpora, speech corpora, language and speech technology tools, etc. The resources are: Cornetto-LMF (Lexicon Markup Framework), Corpus of Contemporary Dutch (Corpus Hedendaags Nederlands), Corpus Gysseling, Corpus VU-DNC (VU University Diachronic News text Corpus), Dictionary of the Frisian Language (Woordenboek der Friese Taal), DuELME-LMF (Lexicon Markup Framework), Language Portal (Taalportaal), Namescape, NERD (Named Entity Recognition and Disambiguation) and TICCLops (Text-Induced Corpus Clean-up online processing system).
The IDS Repository aims at long-term archival of linguistic resources and tools in the field of German studies. It provides data together with metadata in Dublin Core and CMDI formats. The Mannheim Corpus of historical newspapers and magazines consists of 21 german newspapers and magazines from the 18th and 19th century. It comprises about 750 individual volumes on 3532 pages overall. This corpus was assembled and digitized from 2009 to 2011.
The Linguistic Data Consortium (LDC) is an open consortium of universities, libraries, corporations and government research laboratories. It was formed in 1992 to address the critical data shortage then facing language technology research and development. Initially, LDC's primary role was as a repository and distribution point for language resources. Since that time, and with the help of its members, LDC has grown into an organization that creates and distributes a wide array of language resources. LDC also supports sponsored research programs and language-based technology evaluations by providing resources and contributing organizational expertise. LDC is hosted by the University of Pennsylvania and is a center within the University’s School of Arts and Sciences.
Additionally to the institutional repository, current St. Edward's faculty have the option of uploading their work directly to their own SEU accounts on stedwards.figshare.com. Projects created on Figshare will automatically be published on this website as well. For more information, please see documentation
Mulce (MUltimodal contextualized Learner Corpus Exchange) is a research project supported by the National Research Agency (ANR programme: "Corpus and Tools in the Humanities", ANR-06-CORP-006). A teaching corpus (LETEC - Learning and Teaching Corpora) combines a systematic and structured data set, particularly of interactional data, and traces left by a training course experimentation, conducted partially or completely online and completed by additional technical, human, pedagogical and scientific information to enable the data to be analysed in context.
Polish CLARIN node – CLARIN-PL Language Technology Centre – is being built at Wrocław University of Technology. The LTC is addressed to scholars in the humanities and social sciences. Registered users are granted free access to digital language resources and advanced tools to explore them. They can also archive and share their own language data (in written, spoken, video or multimodal form).
Country
Created in 2005 by the CNRS, CNRTL unites in a single portal, a set of linguistic resources and tools for language processing. The CNRTL includes the identification, documentation (metadata), standardization, storage, enhancement and dissemination of resources. The sustainability of the service and the data is guaranteed by the backing of the UMR ATILF (CNRS - Université Nancy), support of the CNRS and its integration in the excellence equipment project ORTOLANG .
The Manchester Romani Project is part of an international network of scholarly projects devoted to research on Romani language and linguistics, coordinated in partnership with Dieter Halwachs (Institute of Linguistics, Graz University and Romani-Projekt Graz), and Peter Bakker (Institute of Linguistics, Aarhus University). The project explores the linguistic features of the dialects of the Romani language, and their distribution in geographical space. An interactive web application is being designed, which will allow users to search and locate on a map different dialectal variants, and to explore how variants cluster in particular regions. Examples sentences and words with sound files will also be made available, to give impressions of dialectal variation within Romani. From the distribution of linguistic forms among the dialects it will be possible to make infeences about social-historical contacts among the Romani communities, and about migration patterns.
The goal of the Center of Estonian Language Resources (CELR) is to create and manage an infrastructure to make the Estonian language digital resources (dictionaries, corpora – both text and speech –, various language databases) and language technology tools (software) available to everyone working with digital language materials. CELR coordinates and organises the documentation and archiving of the resources as well as develops language technology standards and draws up necessary legal contracts and licences for different types of users (public, academic, commercial, etc.). In addition to collecting language resources, a system will be launched for introducing the resources to, informing and educating the potential users. The main users of CELR are researchers from Estonian R&D institutions and Social Sciences and Humanities researchers all over the world via the CLARIN ERIC network of similar centers in Europe. Access to data is provided through different sites: Public Repository https://entu.keeleressursid.ee/public-document , Language resources https://keeleressursid.ee/en/resources/corpora, and MetaShare CELR https://metashare.ut.ee/
The Tromsø Repository of Language and Linguistics (TROLLing) is designed as an archive of linguistic data and statistical code. The archive is open access, which means that all information is available to everyone. All postings are accompanied by searchable metadata that identify the researchers, the languages and linguistic phenomena involved, the statistical methods applied, and scholarly publications based on the data (where relevant). Linguists worldwide are invited to post datasets and statistical code used in their linguistic research.
eLaborate is an online work environment in which scholars can upload scans, transcribe and annotate text, and publish the results as on online text edition which is freely available to all users. Short information about and a link to already published editions is presented on the page Editions under Published. Information about editions currently being prepared is posted on the page Ongoing projects. The eLaborate work environment for the creation and publication of online digital editions is developed by the Huygens Institute for the History of the Netherlands of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences. Although the institute considers itself primarily a research facility and does not maintain a public collection profile, Huygens ING actively maintains almost 200 digitally available resource collections.
ORTOLANG is an EQUIPEX project accepted in February 2012 in the framework of investissements d’avenir. Its aim is to construct a network infrastructure including a repository of language data (corpora, lexicons, dictionaries etc.) and readily available, well-documented tools for its processing. Expected outcomes comprize: promoting research on analysis, modelling and automatic processing of our language to their highest international levels thanks to effective resource pooling; facilitating the use and transfer of resources and tools set up within public laboratories to industrial partners, notably SMEs which often cannot develop such resources and tools for language processing given the cost of investment; promoting French language and the regional languages of France by sharing expertise acquired by public laboratories. ORTOLANG is a service for the language, which is complementary to the service offered by Huma-Num (très grande infrastructure de recherche). Ortolang gives access to SLDR for speech, and CNRTL for text resources.
The aim of the project was to compile a representative computerized corpus of German for the period 1650-1800. This is the first such corpus of early modern German and it is intended as a primary research resource in a number of disciplines. Its structure deliberately parallels that of extant historical corpora of English in order to facilitate systematic comparative studies. The regional dimension which was an essential feature of the projects also provides information about the link between language and changes in the relative cultural and political areas within Germany.