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Found 39 result(s)
The Buckeye Corpus of conversational speech contains high-quality recordings from 40 speakers in Columbus OH conversing freely with an interviewer. The speech has been orthographically transcribed and phonetically labeled. The audio and text files, together with time-aligned phonetic labels, are stored in a format for use with speech analysis software (Xwaves and Wavesurfer). Software for searching the transcription files is currently being written.
The Language Bank features text and speech corpora with different kinds of annotations in over 60 languages. There is also a selection of tools for working with them, from linguistic analyzers to programming environments. Corpora are also available via web interfaces, and users can be allowed to download some of them. The IP holders can monitor the use of their resources and view user statistics.
Competence Centre IULA-UPF-CC CLARIN manages, disseminates and facilitates this catalogue, which provides access to reference information on the use of language technology projects and studies in different disciplines, especially with regard to Humanities and Social Sciences. The Catalog relates information that is organized by Áreas, (disciplines and research topics), Projects (of research that use or have used language technologies), Tasks (that make the tools), Tools (of language technology), Documentation (articles regarding the tools and how they are used) and resources such as Corpora (collections of annotated texts) and Lexica (collections of words for different uses).
Country
PARADISEC (the Pacific And Regional Archive for Digital Sources in Endangered Cultures) offers a facility for digital conservation and access to endangered materials from all over the world. Our research group has developed models to ensure that the archive can provide access to interested communities, and conforms with emerging international standards for digital archiving. We have established a framework for accessioning, cataloguing and digitising audio, text and visual material, and preserving digital copies. The primary focus of this initial stage is safe preservation of material that would otherwise be lost, especially field tapes from the 1950s and 1960s.
Codex Sinaiticus is one of the most important books in the world. Handwritten well over 1600 years ago, the manuscript contains the Christian Bible in Greek, including the oldest complete copy of the New Testament. The Codex Sinaiticus Project is an international collaboration to reunite the entire manuscript in digital form and make it accessible to a global audience for the first time. Drawing on the expertise of leading scholars, conservators and curators, the Project gives everyone the opportunity to connect directly with this famous manuscript.
Currently, the IMS repository focuses on resources provided by the Institute for Natural Language Processing in Stuttgart (IMS) and other CLARIN-D related institutions such as the local Collaborative Research Centre 732 (SFB 732) as well as institutions and/or organizations that belong to the CLARIN-D extended scientific community. Comprehensive guidelines and workflows for submission by external contributors are being compiled based on the experiences in archiving such in-house resources.
OLAC, the Open Language Archives Community, is an international partnership of institutions and individuals who are creating a worldwide virtual library of language resources by: (i) developing consensus on best current practice for the digital archiving of language resources, and (ii) developing a network of interoperating repositories and services for housing and accessing such resources.
CLARIN is a European Research Infrastructure for the Humanities and Social Sciences, focusing on language resources (data and tools). It is being implemented and constantly improved at leading institutions in a large and growing number of European countries, aiming at improving Europe's multi-linguality competence. CLARIN provides several services, such as access to language data and tools to analyze data, and offers to deposit research data, as well as direct access to knowledge about relevant topics in relation to (research on and with) language resources. The main tool is the 'Virtual Language Observatory' providing metadata and access to the different national CLARIN centers and their data.
META-SHARE, the open language resource exchange facility, is devoted to the sustainable sharing and dissemination of language resources (LRs) and aims at increasing access to such resources in a global scale. META-SHARE is an open, integrated, secure and interoperable sharing and exchange facility for LRs (datasets and tools) for the Human Language Technologies domain and other applicative domains where language plays a critical role. META-SHARE is implemented in the framework of the META-NET Network of Excellence. It is designed as a network of distributed repositories of LRs, including language data and basic language processing tools (e.g., morphological analysers, PoS taggers, speech recognisers, etc.). Data and tools can be both open and with restricted access rights, free and for-a-fee.
CLARINO Bergen Center repository is the repository of CLARINO, the Norwegian infrastructure project . Its goal is to implement the Norwegian part of CLARIN. The ultimate aim is to make existing and future language resources easily accessible for researchers and to bring eScience to humanities disciplines. The repository includes INESS the Norwegian Infrastructure for the Exploration of Syntax and Semantics. This infrastructure provides access to treebanks, which are databases of syntactically and semantically annotated sentences.
Country
CEDIFOR is a Digital Humanities Centre, established in 2014. We intend to contribute to bridging the gap between research in the Humanities and computer based methods, and help researchers to master the characteristic problems in this process. We provide methodological expertise for advising researchers from the Humanities, Social, and Educational Sciences on adopting computer based methods in their research. This concerns the planning and operational stage of projects as well as the long-term provision of result data.
The Polinsky Language Sciences Lab at Harvard University is a linguistics lab that examines questions of language structure and its effect on the ways in which people use and process language in real time. We engage in linguistic and interdisciplinary research projects ourselves; offer linguistic research capabilities for undergraduate and graduate students, faculty, and visitors; and build relationships with the linguistic communities in which we do our research. We are interested in a broad range of issues pertaining to syntax, interfaces, and cross-linguistic variation. We place a particular emphasis on novel experimental evidence that facilitates the construction of linguistic theory. We have a strong cross-linguistic focus, drawing upon English, Russian, Chinese, Korean, Mayan languages, Basque, Austronesian languages, languages of the Caucasus, and others. We believe that challenging existing theories with data from as broad a range of languages as possible is a crucial component of the successful development of linguistic theory. We investigate both fluent speakers and heritage speakers—those who grew up hearing or speaking a particular language but who are now more fluent in a different, societally dominant language. Heritage languages, a novel field of linguistic inquiry, are important because they provide new insights into processes of linguistic development and attrition in general, thus increasing our understanding of the human capacity to maintain and acquire language. Understanding language use and processing in real time and how children acquire language helps us improve language study and pedagogy, which in turn improves communication across the globe. Although our lab does not specialize in language acquisition, we have conducted some studies of acquisition of lesser-studied languages and heritage languages, with the purpose of comparing heritage speakers to adults.
Content type(s)
MICASE provides a collection of transcripts of academic speech events recorded at the University of Michigan. The original DAT audiotapes are held in the English Language Institute and may be consulted by bona fide researchers under special arrangements
ANPERSANA is the digital library of IKER (UMR 5478), a research centre specialized in Basque language and texts. The online library platform receives and disseminates primary sources of data issued from research in Basque language and culture. As of today, two corpora of documents have been published. The first one, is a collection of private letters written in an 18th century variety of Basque, documented in and transcribed to modern standard Basque. The discovery of the collection, named Le Dauphin, has enabled the emerging of new questions about the history and sociology of writing in the domain of minority languages, not only in France, but also among the whole Atlantic Arc. The second of the two corpora is a selection of sound recordings about monodic chant in the Basque Country. The documents were collected as part of a PhD thesis research work that took place between 2003 and 2012. It's a total of 50 hours of interviews with francophone and bascophone cultural representatives carried out at either their workplace of the informers or in public areas. ANPERSANA is bundled with an advanced search engine. The documents have been indexed and geo-localized on an interactive map. The platform is engaged with open access and all the resources can be uploaded freely under the different Creative Commons (CC) licenses.
The English Lexicon Project (supported by the National Science Foundation) affords access to a large set of lexical characteristics, along with behavioral data from visual lexical decision and naming studies of 40,481 words and 40,481 nonwords.
>>>>> As of 01/12/2015, deposit of data on SLDR website will be suspended to allow the public opening of Ortolang platform https://www.ortolang.fr/#/market/home .<<<<<Speech & Language Data Repository (SLDR) is a Trusted Data Repository offering labs and scholars a free-of-charge service for sharing their oral/linguistic data and archiving it with the help of procedures compliant with the OAIS model for long-term preservation. Its entire storage is referenced in international repositories such as OLAC (Open Language Archives Community) and CLARIN Virtual Language Observatory (VLO). Currently, packages are distributed via the TGE-Adonis grid, now integrated in Huma-Num, hosted by CC-IN2P3 and preserved on the platform of CINES, an institutional archive beneficiary of the Data Seal of Approval.
The Text Laboratory provides assistance with databases, word lists, corpora and tailored solutions for language technology. We also work on research and development projects alone or in cooperation with others - locally, nationally and internationally. Services and tools: Word and frequency lists, Written corpora, Speech corpora, Multilingual corpora, Databases, Glossa Search Tool, The Oslo-Bergen Tagger, GREI grammar games, Audio files: dialects from Norway and America etc., Nordic Atlas of Language Structures (NALS) Journal, Norwegian in America, NEALT, Ethiopian Language Technology, Access to Corpora
Clarin.dk is a Danish IT infrastructure intended for use by humanities scholars. The infrastructure includes digitized research material in the form of written and spoken texts, audio and video records, lexical resources and tools. Part of the resources collected or converted to other formats as part of the project. Other resources developed or collected in other projects and made available to researchers through Clarin.dk. The website is regularly updated with new materials and tools. The vision is to create the humanities researcher's toolbox through the creation of resources with associated tools and integrating resources together in a web-based electronic research environment provided for humanities researchers. Such access to resources and tools will allow scientists unprecedented opportunities and will also help to enhance their ability to participate in European collaborative projects. The Danish CLARIN project will eventually generate better conditions for Danish language technology research and development.
The focus of CLARIN INL Portal is on resources that are relevant to the lexicological study of the Dutch language and on resources relevant for research in and development of language and speech technology. For Example: lexicons, lexical databases, text corpora, speech corpora, language and speech technology tools, etc. The resources are: Cornetto-LMF (Lexicon Markup Framework), Corpus of Contemporary Dutch (Corpus Hedendaags Nederlands), Corpus Gysseling, Corpus VU-DNC (VU University Diachronic News text Corpus), Dictionary of the Frisian Language (Woordenboek der Friese Taal), DuELME-LMF (Lexicon Markup Framework), Language Portal (Taalportaal), Namescape, NERD (Named Entity Recognition and Disambiguation) and TICCLops (Text-Induced Corpus Clean-up online processing system).
The IDS Repository aims at long-term archival of linguistic resources and tools in the field of German studies. It provides data together with metadata in Dublin Core and CMDI formats. The Mannheim Corpus of historical newspapers and magazines consists of 21 german newspapers and magazines from the 18th and 19th century. It comprises about 750 individual volumes on 3532 pages overall. This corpus was assembled and digitized from 2009 to 2011.
The Linguistic Data Consortium (LDC) is an open consortium of universities, libraries, corporations and government research laboratories. It was formed in 1992 to address the critical data shortage then facing language technology research and development. Initially, LDC's primary role was as a repository and distribution point for language resources. Since that time, and with the help of its members, LDC has grown into an organization that creates and distributes a wide array of language resources. LDC also supports sponsored research programs and language-based technology evaluations by providing resources and contributing organizational expertise. LDC is hosted by the University of Pennsylvania and is a center within the University’s School of Arts and Sciences.
Språkbanken (the Swedish Language Bank) was established in 1975 as a national center located in the Faculty of Arts, University of Gothenburg. Alléns groundbreaking corpus linguistic research resulted in the creation of one of the first large electronic text corpora in another language than English, with one million words of newspaper text. The task of Språkbanken is to collect, develop, and store (Swedish) text corpora, and to make linguistic data extracted from the corpora available to researchers and to the public.
Polish CLARIN node – CLARIN-PL Language Technology Centre – is being built at Wrocław University of Technology. The LTC is addressed to scholars in the humanities and social sciences. Registered users are granted free access to digital language resources and advanced tools to explore them. They can also archive and share their own language data (in written, spoken, video or multimodal form).
Lithuania became a full member of CLARIN ERIC in January of 2015 and soon CLARIN-LT consortium was founded by three partner universities: Vytautas Magnus University, Kaunas Technology University and Vilnius University. The main goal of the consortium is to become a CLARIN B centre, which will be able to serve language users in Lithuania and Europe for storing and accessing language resources.